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    I am resitting this module on Monday and I needed some help. I have enough wider reading but I just had a few questions.

    How much wider reading do I have to involve in my essays and what sort of things do I have to say - Do I just mention the names of poems or books or should I say actually quotations from the poems, and if I do that, how many quotations should I try and use?

    What exactly do we get marked on?

    I've forgotten other questions but I will put them up when I remember

    Do you have any tips for me?

    Thank you
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    I'm resitting this module too .

    Wider reading I'm told you can paraphrase, so say like "the anti war sentiment expressed in this extract is similar to that in Wilfred Owen's 'X'..." etc and develop your point, but if you can quote that's also very good.

    We get marked on Assessment objectives:

    AO1 (clear communication, knowledge and understanding etc and accurate written expression): which is 9% of the marks.

    AO2ii (knowledge and understanding of different literary types and periods, exploration and comparisons between literary texts): which is 7%

    AO3 (Language analysis and understanding): 8%

    AO4 (Articulate and independent opinions and judgements of the candidate): 7%

    AO5ii (Understanding of the contexts in which literary texts are written and understood and evaluating it's significance): 9%

    And it's not best to set yourself a target, when I write practice essays for the b section I have between 3-10 references to wider reading.

    The assessment objectives are QUANTITATIVE, so say you hammered AO3 loads in the poem comparison (which is easier to do) it doesn't matter so much if you have less of it in the part b. If you understand what I mean?
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    (Original post by Alexandra1234567)
    I'm resitting this module too .

    Wider reading I'm told you can paraphrase, so say like "the anti war sentiment expressed in this extract is similar to that in Wilfred Owen's 'X'..." etc and develop your point, but if you can quote that's also very good.

    We get marked on Assessment objectives:

    AO1 (clear communication, knowledge and understanding etc and accurate written expression): which is 9% of the marks.

    AO2ii (knowledge and understanding of different literary types and periods, exploration and comparisons between literary texts): which is 7%

    AO3 (Language analysis and understanding): 8%

    AO4 (Articulate and independent opinions and judgements of the candidate): 7%

    AO5ii (Understanding of the contexts in which literary texts are written and understood and evaluating it's significance): 9%

    And it's not best to set yourself a target, when I write practice essays for the b section I have between 3-10 references to wider reading.

    The assessment objectives are QUANTITATIVE, so say you hammered AO3 loads in the poem comparison (which is easier to do) it doesn't matter so much if you have less of it in the part b. If you understand what I mean?
    Yer I get that thanks

    How much wider reading do we have to refer to then. Do we have to just compare the last three extracts, and say things like (for example) "Female poet x, from Extract c, thinks of war as noble, similar to other female poets at the time (e.g. Jessie Pope), however not all women agreed with that. Vera Britain writes in her autobiography....." and show a contrasting women viewpoint.
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    With 1b I'm quite confused. Do we directly compare the extracts like we do in 1a? Or do we analyse the extracts find similarities/differences in typicality with our wider reading and then do a comparison in the concluding paragraph?

    E.g

    Talk about C, and compare with wider reading
    Talk about D, and compare with wider reading
    Talk about E, and compare about wider reading
    Then compare C, D and E and assess them on their typicality in comparison to each other?
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    (Original post by Hassan169)
    With 1b I'm quite confused. Do we directly compare the extracts like we do in 1a? Or do we analyse the extracts find similarities/differences in typicality with our wider reading and then do a comparison in the concluding paragraph?

    E.g

    Talk about C, and compare with wider reading
    Talk about D, and compare with wider reading
    Talk about E, and compare about wider reading
    Then compare C, D and E and assess them on their typicality in comparison to each other?

    I think that's a good idea. The only problem I think I could have is how much wider reading to compare them to. Are you going to try and learn 3 pieces of literature which you know amazingly well and so compare them separately, or try and compare them all to one piece of literature (and whilst your're talking, you mention stuff from other bits of wider reading).

    What I was planing to try and do is maybe use themes that re-occur in the extracts and then talk about how the extracts or similar or different, and then somehow bring in wider reading - e.g. If there is a theme that shows the harsh realities of war, I could try and bring in Journey's End, Owen's 'Dulce et Decorum Est', maybe Sassoon's 'Suicide in the Trenches' - Only problem is I don't really know many themes off by heart so I have to learn some.

    On the question, it says "By comparing Extracts C,D and E, and by referring to your wider reading,...." So I think they want us to compare the 3 together - but not in as much detail as 1(a) - and then mention wider reading to back up our points in showing how typical it is/isn't.
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    (Original post by claret_n_blue)
    I think that's a good idea. The only problem I think I could have is how much wider reading to compare them to.
    I've got quite a bit of wider reading so there's always something I can find similarities and differences with. If the extracts have similar themes then I will group those with the similar theme and compare it with the same wider reading... which is basically what you're planning to do. The problem I found with it last year was that the extracts were very long and so trying to find points of comparision with them was difficult and a long process. Thats why I ran out of time and ended up with a D I need some way to compare them without going into so much detail so that I can bring in my wide reading. Right now I'm doing my first ever practice essay lol... which is very bad. But I'm finding it good so far. =]
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    (Original post by Hassan169)
    I've got quite a bit of wider reading so there's always something I can find similarities and differences with. If the extracts have similar themes then I will group those with the similar theme and compare it with the same wider reading... which is basically what you're planning to do. The problem I found with it last year was that the extracts were very long and so trying to find points of comparision with them was difficult and a long process. Thats why I ran out of time and ended up with a D I need some way to compare them without going into so much detail so that I can bring in my wide reading. Right now I'm doing my first ever practice essay lol... which is very bad. But I'm finding it good so far. =]

    So what are you going to do? Analyse extract C and compare with wider reading, analyse D and compare, analyse E and small comparison in final few paragraphs?

    Lol I really hope they make it an easy test and give marks away easily as it is the last one.
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    (Original post by claret_n_blue)
    So what are you going to do? Analyse extract C and compare with wider reading, analyse D and compare, analyse E and small comparison in final few paragraphs?
    Yep thats exactly what I'm gonna do. My idea is basically to analyse how typical is each extract. I'll do that by analysing the extract and comparing to wider reading. At the end as a conclusion I'll discuss which extracts are more typical and why.

    Lol I really hope they make it an easy test and give marks away easily as it is the last one.
    Were they really giving away marks easily in the last one? LOL. My problem was I just talked rubbish. My essays had no structure, I didn't know about the Assessment Objectives. That's why I got a D. I'm gonna need to get 61% this time round so I can get a B overall for English. I think the main things to remember is: for 1a make sure you analyse form, language and structure. In 1b do the same (but perhaps you don't need to do as much) and try and put your own views across (you get marked for that) and use your wider reading well.

    How long are you gonna spend on planning/reading?
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    (Original post by Hassan169)

    Were they really giving away marks easily in the last one? LOL. My problem was I just talked rubbish. My essays had no structure, I didn't know about the Assessment Objectives. That's why I got a D. I'm gonna need to get 61% this time round so I can get a B overall for English. I think the main things to remember is: for 1a make sure you analyse form, language and structure. In 1b do the same (but perhaps you don't need to do as much) and try and put your own views across (you get marked for that) and use your wider reading well.

    How long are you gonna spend on planning/reading?

    What I'm going to do is as soon as they say start, I'm going to write down all the quotes and everything I have been trying to memorise (I do that in less than 5 mins hopefully). Then I'll look at 1a and basically spend around 10 mins reading the poems, annotating and making notes. Then hopefully I spend an hour doing the actually essay. So I'll have ermm.. 1hr 45 left - The most time I'll spend is 1 hr 15, so I will have at least 1 hour 30 to do 1b. For 1b, I'll spend about 15 mins planning and then around 1hr to 1hr and 15 writing.


    I hope the texts they give are nothing obvious like Journeys End or Dulce et Decorum Est or something. It'll be good to have an Owen poem or something to compare to the others, but if it is a big one, then that's basically my wider reading gone lol.

    What about you, how much are you planning on reading and doing? I read the model essay and I think I might scan over that like an hour before the exam so I have a structure of how to write the essay, in my head - and then before the exam look over the notes for my wider reading.
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    (Original post by claret_n_blue)
    What about you, how much are you planning on reading and doing?
    I'll spend about 10 minutes planning 1a and 15 minutes planning 1b. The main thing to note down in the plan I think is info on the form, structure and language and highlight any important quotes. For 1b, I'll try and identify themes in the plan and quickly jot down wider reading I could compare it to.

    I've done a practice essay. It wasn't too bad. What mark do you need to get from this paper?
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    (Original post by Hassan169)
    I'll spend about 10 minutes planning 1a and 15 minutes planning 1b. The main thing to note down in the plan I think is info on the form, structure and language and highlight any important quotes. For 1b, I'll try and identify themes in the plan and quickly jot down wider reading I could compare it to.

    I've done a practice essay. It wasn't too bad. What mark do you need to get from this paper?

    Ermmm, I think I need a C in this and a C in the Hamlet to get an A overall. My coursework is much better now so I think I should be able to get an A. Last year I really messed up the A2 but somehow I ended up with a C overall - I think it was because I got over 90% at AS.

    What sort of things do we write about when they say "Form"?

    I've read some extracts of books and learned some quotes to pretend that I now what I'm talking about, but I'm fine on the poems.What sort of wider reading have you done?
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    (Original post by claret_n_blue)

    What sort of things do we write about when they say "Form"?
    They mean use of rhymes etc.

    I've read some extracts of books and learned some quotes to pretend that I now what I'm talking about, but I'm fine on the poems.What sort of wider reading have you done?
    Lol same here. A lot of the Wider Reading I have... I haven't actually read. I just pick out relevent quotes that I can mention and "pretend" I read.

    I have quotes from:

    Birdsong
    Regeneration
    All Quiet on the Western Front
    Journey's End
    Blackadder
    O What a Lovely War

    And quotes from a few poems
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    (Original post by Hassan169)
    .

    How did you find it? I thought the texts were a bit hard to compare seeing as they were all from different genres! What did you think?
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    (Original post by claret_n_blue)
    How did you find it? I thought the texts were a bit hard to compare seeing as they were all from different genres! What did you think?
    1a was okay. Extract A was a bit confusing but I tried to talk about nature as much as I could. I compared structure and the language used in alot of detail though. Should hopefully pick up marks.

    1b was not too bad. I found themes of comeradeship in Extract C and D. Graphic realism in all extracts. I mentioned religion as well comparing C and E. I mentioned how Extract D was untypical because it was written by a woman and was addressing the horrors of war. I put in as much wider reading as I could.

    Hopefully we did well.
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    I hope we all did . Section A was effort, but the second question I had plenty to say. At least it's over, only Hamlet and LB left for me now!
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    (Original post by Alexandra1234567)
    I hope we all did . Section A was effort, but the second question I had plenty to say.
    What themes did you find in 1b?
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    (Original post by Hassan169)
    What themes did you find in 1b?
    I didn't look for 'themes', I just analysed all of them and compared them to as much as I could. There was loads to say about all of them, luckilyyy! How did you find it?
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    (Original post by Alexandra1234567)
    I didn't look for 'themes', I just analysed all of them and compared them to as much as I could. There was loads to say about all of them, luckilyyy! How did you find it?
    Well for 1b I found some themes and then analysed each one indiviudally comparing to wider reading. Yeah there was so much I could've wrote. I didn't like any of the extracts in 1a. I thought I was done with nature when I did Lyrical Ballads lol. But I managed to do plenty of language, form and structure analysis and come up with my own original explanations.

    I feel alot more confident this time round. 61% shouldn't be too hard to achieve I hope... especially since I was revising to get an A. Fingers crossed.
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    1A was hard!!

    1B was good, the common theme was trench warfare and nature/shell holes/environment
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    (Original post by Hassan169)
    I mentioned religion as well comparing C and E. I mentioned how Extract D was untypical because it was written by a woman and was addressing the horrors of war. .
    atypical :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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