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How can I contribute to haiti cause without having to give money to the bourgeoisie watch

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    I think it was very horrible what happend in Haiti,,, i am sure does people did not desreve that,,
    hey does anyone think the world is coming to an end,,, i mean the 2012 thing,,?
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    Wow I just read through this thread and I'm disgusted at the attitude on here.
    Just wow.
    Have some empathy for the people in Haiti.
    This is a disaster, much more serious than some bloody snow!
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    (Original post by Fusilero)
    I think feeling guilty is something only you can do. They can't do it for you.
    true but they can try and make you feel guilty
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    I know I'm not going to find one, which is why I don't donate money. :p:
    I bet you'll be more than happy to make use of charitable services if circumstances dictate so in the wild and unpredictable future.
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    (Original post by tinktinktinkerbell)
    true but they can try and make you feel guilty
    Yeah, but the fact you feel guilty comes from your own feeling that you've not contributed rather than anything they do.
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    (Original post by Ham22)
    maybe this is what they can afford?!

    considering i live on £50 a week, £15 would be a lot, maybe it's a lot for them too.

    and on anothe note- i don't understand people who don't feel any empathy for others suffering. (even if you don't know them) it's still sad!
    He's on of these people who give a small amount and then feel all smug about it. Just look at his post, it's like HE personally saved dozens from starvation. What a hero.
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    (Original post by Fusilero)
    Yeah, but the fact you feel guilty comes from your own feeling that you've not contributed rather than anything they do.
    to set the record straight i dont feel guilty
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    (Original post by Jizkid Jnr)
    too soon. have you seen whats happened?
    ok fine send it next week
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    (Original post by Fusion)
    I bet you'll be more than happy to make use of charitable services if circumstances dictate so in the wild and unpredictable future.
    Depending on the charity, most likely, but that doesn't mean that I need to be donating money to charities that I feel may not use it to its full advantage.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Depending on the charity, most likely, but that doesn't mean that I need to be donating money to charities that I feel may not use it to its full advantage.
    Well, I'm sure that you wouldn't work for a charity for nothing (unless you were able to obtain another stream of income or cash source, as is the case with most small-scale volunteers), thereby reducing yourself to absolute poverty. It's counterproductive to expect full-time charity workers to turn themselves into charity cases -- or to recruit full-time charity workers only from those with sufficient finance to allow themselves to work unwaged or virtually so, such people being a small proportion of the population and, indeed, the proportion of the population least likely to give to charity.

    Nothing works to its full advantage. We live in an imperfect work, for which we have merely imperfect solutions. It's wrong to shun these solutions in favour of inexistent perfect ones.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Well, I'm sure that you wouldn't work for a charity for nothing (unless you were able to obtain another stream of income or cash source, as is the case with most small-scale volunteers), thereby reducing yourself to absolute poverty. It's counterproductive to expect full-time charity workers to turn themselves into charity cases -- or to recruit full-time charity workers from those with sufficient finance to allow themselves to work unwaged, such people being a small proportion of the population and, indeed, the proportion of the population least likely to give to charity.

    Nothing works to its full advantage. We live in an imperfect work, for which we have merely imperfect solutions. It's wrong to shun these solutions in favour of inexistent perfect ones.
    It is the advertising costs I take issue with. I am, of course, happy that staff are paid a suitable amount for their work, and that essential costs are paid, but I take offense, personally, to charity adverts on television or in magazines.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    It is the advertising costs I take issue with. I am, of course, happy that staff are paid a suitable amount for their work, and that essential costs are paid, but I take offense, personally, to charity adverts on television or in magazines.
    We live in a world in which we're bombarded by advertising, marketing and promotions. One can suggest that such base tactics don't work on such free-thinking people as oneself, perhaps rightly though probably wrongly -- but the fact of the matter is that organisations spend billions on marketing because it produces results. Such money would not be spent if its effect were generally counterproductive or, even, negligible.

    If spending £500,000 on advertising can raise £1,000,000 in revenue, as is often the case, there's little point in being sanctimonious about it. The fact of the matter is that the charity has gained money, £500,000, which it would not have done had it not spent on advertising. No charity is going to advertise repeatedly if it merely loses funds through doing so. No charity, moreover, would gain the kind of public exposure that it needs to deal with, for example, natural disasters, or even more day-to-day work, were it not to advertise.
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    I never said they didn't deserve pay.

    I responded to someone saying that they didn't think anyone who worked for a charitable organisation should pay themselves/be paid bonuses. I gave an example of chuggers being paid bonuses.
    Personally I find "chuggers" annoying because most of the ones who end up accosting me know so little about the charities that they are raising money for. Whereas volunteers on the other hand I find are much more knowledgeable about the charity - and the issue that they are dealing with.

    On the "executive pay" issue, it's a different call for each sector.

    In the private sector, so long as the goods or services provided by the firm concerned are to the satisfaction of the buyer, the seller can pay their executives whatever they like, so long as they can afford it and their shareholders approve.

    In the public sector, people are (rightly) concerned about some of the salaries paid at the highest level because those salaries are being funded by tax revenues that they have no choice in contributing to.

    In the charitable sector, people give money to chosen causes and want to do so in the knowledge that as much of their donations go to making a difference and that management and administration costs are kept to a minimum.

    The "traditional" view of the public and charitable sectors is that people are motivated by things other than high levels of remuneration (pay & perks). What's happened in recent decades is that high levels of pay in the public and charitable sectors have become "acceptable" - in part because at senior levels, the view of the various administrations was that they wanted to bring in private sector expertise into other parts of the economy, and that this expertise did not come cheap - hence the arguement for paying senior management more.
    sorry should have bothered to read what you were responding to before I went off on one!
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    (Original post by Notker)
    Why do you even care? A load of people far away who you have never met got killed - who cares?
    You're right. The fact they're far away and seemingly irrelevant, yet people still feel bad for them and want to help, just shows that those people are better than thou. What is it they say, the best type of charity is to help someone you know can't help you?

    (ps: I dont mean to be judgemental and say that just to get a point across. I know you're just a dumb kid who wants to say something controversial just to get some attention )
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    Volunteering? That is what I am hoping to do...
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    (Original post by Ham22)
    maybe this is what they can afford?!

    considering i live on £50 a week, £15 would be a lot, maybe it's a lot for them too.

    and on anothe note- i don't understand people who don't feel any empathy for others suffering. (even if you don't know them) it's still sad!
    well since my hours have been reduced its half a weeks pay. and I just said what i did, and £15 is a lot more than some people have donated. i dont have many living costs as im still at home, but still.
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    (Original post by Paxdax)
    He's on of these people who give a small amount and then feel all smug about it. Just look at his post, it's like HE personally saved dozens from starvation. What a hero.
    sorry to double post, i in now way implied that, all i said is that my money was going to help feed the people, becuase the next big issue is the lack of food. seriously wtf.

    also im pretty sure ive already let it be known that im not doing it for me. some people, jesus christ.

    also seeing as you made it personal, juding by your reputation you're not exactly the nicest person either, so who the **** are you to pass comment.
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    (Original post by MrGuillotine)
    You're right. The fact they're far away and seemingly irrelevant, yet people still feel bad for them and want to help, just shows that those people are better than thou. What is it they say, the best type of charity is to help someone you know can't help you?

    (ps: I dont mean to be judgemental and say that just to get a point across. I know you're just a dumb kid who wants to say something controversial just to get some attention )
    I'm really not trying to be controversial. I don't see why people care - they didn't care that Haiti was an absolute ******** before the earth and they won't care in a few months time when it will still be an absolute ********. People are masturbating their egos, making themselves feel good; nothing more.
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    (Original post by Notker)
    I'm really not trying to be controversial. I don't see why people care - they didn't care that Haiti was an absolute ******** before the earth and they won't care in a few months time when it will still be an absolute ********. People are masturbating their egos, making themselves feel good; nothing more.
    Yeah I definately agree with you. But some people genuinely would rather others didnt suffer on a massive scale. Honest.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    If the UK had an earthquake, you wouldn't see any other countries helping us.
    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Damn straight.
    If the UK ever had a serious natural disaster I don't see why we wouldn't recieve international aid.
    When hurricane katrina occured America was giving hundreds of millions in aid by the iternational community.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interna...ricane_Katrina
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...042801113.html
    http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/di...l-aid-response

    Even afghanistan donated something. The humaniterian crisis in haiti is much worse then new orleans.
 
 
 
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