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This will make you feel insignificant... watch

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    (Original post by Bhumbauze)
    Ahaha, I have such an ego... I got to the end of that video... and a voice in my head just said "**** you, yes I am."
    Haha, some people :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by WhuTom)
    Is it bad I got to like 1:00 on that and felt scared to go any further?
    I got to the end and actually expected my brain to short-circuit or something.
    As i have an exam in about 8 hours, that wouldn't be helpful. and what i'm still doing up is anyone's guess.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Because we hold no power.
    Power is subjective and down to observation. Without living, thinking organisms to observe the universe, NOTHING in it has any power. Therefore, a living organism - any living organism - has more power than the largest star or black hole, or even an entire (unpopulated) galaxy.

    That said, I'm only basing that logic on what's observable at the moment, what we think might be (but probably isn't) right. I don't think humans really have any understanding at all of what's out there or how it all works... and in the grand scheme of it, of all those unknowns, we probably are pretty insignificant. But it has absolutely balls all to do with "o man that's really big!" or "omg that's like... so far away I can't even imagine".

    Basically... I think the physical scale of reality is unimportant. It's the layers of it that are mind boggling. 99.99999999999% of which I'm fairly confident we have absolutely zero comprehension of.
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    (Original post by Bhumbauze)
    Power is subjective and down to observation. Without living, thinking organisms to observe the universe, NOTHING in it has any power. Therefore, a living organism - any living organism - has more power than the largest star or black hole, or even an entire (unpopulated) galaxy.

    That said, I'm only basing that logic on what's observable at the moment, what we think might be (but probably isn't) right. I don't think humans really have any understanding at all of what's out there or how it all works... and in the grand scheme of it, of all those unknowns, we probably are pretty insignificant. But it has absolutely balls all to do with "o man that's really big!" or "omg that's like... so far away I can't even imagine".

    Basically... I think the physical scale of reality is unimportant. It's the layers of it that are mind boggling. 99.99999999999% of which I'm fairly confident we have absolutely zero comprehension of.
    How does it not?

    Something have the possibility to kill you in an instant and being far bigger than you generally means it holds more power.
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    (Original post by modini)
    This video will give you a very good idea of size comparison. This will truely shock you.

    Enlightening. :sexface:
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Any kind of explosion from the sun.

    And any close star going into a super nova.
    1. That will never happen for at least 3 billion years.

    2. The only star which is of a possible threat to us in the near future is eta carinae, again unlikely to have any real effect, it may become as bright as the moon or something but we wont be engulfed. Supernovae in the milky way have been going off since the earth was formed (4 billion years ago), and nothing has happened.

    3. There are intricate systems which detect the possible chance of asteroids hitting us for the next hundred decades at least.

    Don't spout rubbish if you don't know what you're talking about you fool. In particular, don't ask me if I am on crack if you don't know what you're talking about.
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    (Original post by WhuTom)
    Given its size, I'm assuming this mega star is over 9000 billion lightyears away from us, right?

    Thinking about the universe actually does scare me sometimes, like how phobias scare people, how big it is and all...

    agreed, i have this thing wheer i have to know the answers to stuff and like i need to know how bib the univers is, i know i never will but i lose sleep over it.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    1. That will never happen for at least 3 billion years.

    2. The only star which is of a possible threat to us in the near future is eta carinae, again unlikely to have any real effect, it may become as bright as the moon or something but we wont be engulfed. Supernovae in the milky way have been going off since the earth was formed (4 billion years ago), and nothing has happened.

    3. There are intricate systems which detect the possible chance of asteroids hitting us for the next hundred decades at least.

    Don't spout rubbish if you don't know what you're talking about you fool. In particular, don't ask me if I am on crack if you don't know what you're talking about.

    You don't know what your talking about, we have observed about 2% of stars which are within range of causing damage, there is a good chance there are ones within that 98%.

    And one case of extinction on Earth has been accredited to it.

    Jog on son.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    How does it not?

    Something have the possibility to kill you in an instant and being far bigger than you generally means it holds more power.
    My neighbor can kill me in an instant if he had a gun and broke in and decided to kill me. He is a human. So his power is ultimately the same as this so called "power" from "an explosion". Big ******* deal.
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    thats big dawg!!

    (anyone who gets this deserves a biscuit)
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    My neighbor can kill me in an instant if he had a gun and broke in and decided to kill me. He is a human. So his power is ultimately the same as this so called "power" from "an explosion". Big ******* deal.
    This has been proposed as the cause of the end Ordovician extinction, which resulted in the death of nearly 60% of the oceanic life on Earth.[93] In 1996, it was theorized that traces of past supernovae might be detectable on Earth in the form of metal isotope signatures in rock strata. Subsequently, iron-60 enrichment has been reported in deep-sea rock of the Pacific Ocean
    AND YOU SAY I DON'T KNOW WHAT IM TALKING ABOUT.

    ON YOUR BIKE.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    what?
    I don't think there is any way i can make that statement any less ambiguous. Basic theory is there is no difference in computational complexity between the human brain, a super computer, a splash of rain or the chaotic thermal currents of a star, so they can be considered equivalent.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    You don't know what your talking about, we have observed about 2% of stars which are within range of causing damage, there is a good chance there are ones within that 98%.

    And one case of extinction on Earth has been accredited to it.

    Jog on son.
    That is complete and utter rubbish. Where did you get that information from? What do you consider within a range of "causing damage"

    Yes, when humans weren't around. Humans are currently researching ways in which to deflect bigger and bigger asteroids, theres one which is scheduled to pass within 30,000km of earth around 2029 (i think) of which a programme to organise stopping it hitting the earth in such a case is currently being researched.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    That is complete and utter rubbish. Where did you get that information from? What do you consider within a range of "causing damage"

    Yes, when humans weren't around. Humans are currently researching ways in which to deflect bigger and bigger asteroids, theres one which is scheduled to pass within 30,000km of earth around 2029 (i think) of which a programme to organise stopping it hitting the earth in such a case is currently being researched.
    Read my last post.

    Come back when your not making figures off the top of your head.

    But I will use more simple wiki extracts to debunk you.

    A near-Earth supernova is an explosion resulting from the death of a star that occurs close enough to the Earth (roughly fewer than 100 light-years away) to have noticeable effects on its biosphere
    Type Ia supernovae are thought to be potentially the most dangerous if they occur close enough to the Earth. Because Type Ia supernovae arise from dim, common white dwarf stars, it is likely that a supernova that could affect the Earth will occur unpredictably and take place in a star system that is not well studied.
    Bye bye.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    AND YOU SAY I DON'T KNOW WHAT IM TALKING ABOUT.

    ON YOUR BIKE.
    I know exactly what I am talking about. Does that say that the supernova wiped out earth? no. You know most elements with a mass heavier than iron were solely created in a supernova at some point in time? i.e. all the gold in the world once came from a supernova explosion. Just because it ends up on earth doesn't mean the earth was involved with the explosion, it was just present when the matter that formed the earth binded together.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    I know exactly what I am talking about. Does that say that the supernova wiped out earth? no. You know most elements with a mass heavier than iron were solely created in a supernova at some point in time? i.e. all the gold in the world once came from a supernova explosion. Just because it ends up on earth doesn't mean the earth was involved with the explosion, it was just present when the matter that formed the earth binded together.
    Who said anything about wiping out the Earth?

    It eradicated half the marine life, thats far more powerful than you or me, and it's light years away.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    Yes, when humans weren't around. Humans are currently researching ways in which to deflect bigger and bigger asteroids, theres one which is scheduled to pass within 30,000km of earth around 2029 (i think) of which a programme to organise stopping it hitting the earth in such a case is currently being researched.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    2. The only star which is of a possible threat to us in the near future is eta carinae, again unlikely to have any real effect, it may become as bright as the moon or something but we wont be engulfed. Supernovae in the milky way have been going off since the earth was formed (4 billion years ago), and nothing has happened.

    3. There are intricate systems which detect the possible chance of asteroids hitting us for the next hundred decades at least.
    2. There are a number of possible supernovae near us. Though most are still too far away for catastrophic damage, they could have knock-on effects for the planet itself. Ever thought that the more supernovae that explode without hurting us increases the chances that the next one will be dangerous?

    3. Actually we (humans) are drastically under-prepared for any kind of asteroid impact. Our early-warning systems aren't early enough for us to do much if the asteroid is of any significant size at all. I believe 'significant size' is like 2 miles or something, it doesn't have to be uncommonly massive. I read an article on this recently.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Read my last post.

    Come back when your not making figures off the top of your head.

    But I will use more simple wiki extracts to debunk you.





    Bye bye.
    If you can find a list of stars that are ready to form a supernova in the next 10 million years that are within 100 light years from earth, then you will be able to count them with your fingers.

    You are the one quoting figures off your head, you still haven't given me a source for "we haven't catalogued 98% of stars nearby"

    And what effects on the biosphere? That could be a light brighter than the moon keeping animals awake at night. It means nothing.

    and LOL that you have admitted that you are getting this information from wikipedia.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Who said anything about wiping out the Earth?

    It eradicated half the marine life, thats far more powerful than you or me, and it's light years away.
    Is it? I don't think it's too far-fetched to say that one single human being could develop some sort of poison / biological weapon that could eradicate ALL sea life. Certainly not if we're considering any future advances in technology. And that fact that they'd be doing so consciously is what makes it an act of power.
 
 
 
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