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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Who said anything about wiping out the Earth?

    It eradicated half the marine life, thats far more powerful than you or me, and it's light years away.
    no its not... that was an asteroid. You are talking about the extinction of dinosaurs etc right? that wasn't a supernova. Stop wasting my time you fool.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    If you can find a list of stars that are ready to form a supernova in the next 10 million years that are within 100 light years from earth, then you will be able to count them with your fingers.

    You are the one quoting figures off your head, you still haven't given me a source for "we haven't catalogued 98% of stars nearby"

    And what effects on the biosphere? That could be a light brighter than the moon keeping animals awake at night. It means nothing.

    and LOL that you have admitted that you are getting this information from wikipedia.
    We don't know, it said in the quote I showed you that one could randomly occur, please stop the ************ .

    Considering the ******** you have made up, me giving a rough estimation is by no means a problem in this argument.

    No, gamma rays, are you that uneducated?

    Well hey at least I'm using some correct information, unlike you Mr ******************************** ******.

    You speak more **** than a cows arse.
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    Ive never been concerned about anything too big to be under my control
    that's healthy
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    (Original post by binglebongle)
    Ever thought that the more supernovae that explode without hurting us increases the chances that the next one will be dangerous?
    False logic. If you flip a coin 9 times and get heads every time, the odds on the next flip are still 50/50.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    no its not... that was an asteroid. You are talking about the extinction of dinosaurs etc right? that wasn't a supernova. Stop wasting my time you fool.
    AHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHA.

    The dinosaurs????

    AWWHHHH

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordovic...inction_events

    Your making my night.
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    (Original post by Bhumbauze)
    Is it? I don't think it's too far-fetched to say that one single human being could develop some sort of poison / biological weapon that could eradicate ALL sea life. Certainly not if we're considering any future advances in technology. And that fact that they'd be doing so consciously is what makes it an act of power.
    Can we prevent it? No

    Therefore we are powerless...
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    (Original post by binglebongle)
    2. There are a number of possible supernovae near us. Though most are still too far away for catastrophic damage, they could have knock-on effects for the planet itself. Ever thought that the more supernovae that explode without hurting us increases the chances that the next one will be dangerous?

    3. Actually we (humans) are drastically under-prepared for any kind of asteroid impact. Our early-warning systems aren't early enough for us to do much if the asteroid is of any significant size at all. I believe 'significant size' is like 2 miles or something, it doesn't have to be uncommonly massive. I read an article on this recently.
    2. No I havn't. Mainly because the two events are mutually ******* exclusive. You got an interview for cambridge? unbelievable.

    3. wrong again. The asteroid I mentioned is less than a 1km wide. There are thousands of asteroids on catalogues which are being tracked everyday by the likes of nasa.
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    That is really amazing. I read that if that star took the place of our sun. It would extend out to the orbit of saturn.
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    (Original post by Bhumbauze)
    False logic. If you flip a coin 9 times and get heads every time, the odds on the next flip are still 50/50.
    Yeah, the gambler's fallacy. I've forgotten what I meant by typing that. Probably meant to go to bed (2:13am!) and got confused... :eek3:
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    AHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHA.

    The dinosaurs????

    AWWHHHH

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordovic...inction_events

    Your making my night.
    This does not matter whatsoever. Like I have said before, Astronomers have all stars which are reaching the end of their life on catalogue and if any were of any significant threat believe me you would have already heard about it.

    also bear in mind this phrase: "While plausible, there is no unambiguous evidence that such a nearby gamma ray burst has ever actually occurred. One method would be to search the Moon for uneven exposure to gamma rays."
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    This does not matter whatsoever. Like I have said before, Astronomers have all stars which are reaching the end of their life on catalogue and if any were of any significant threat believe me you would have already heard about it.
    The fact you got the ability for it to hit us wrong.

    The fact you got the scale of the damage it could do wrong.

    The fact you think light is the worst thing from a supernova.

    The fact you change your argument when you fail.

    The fact you think the only extinction to happen is the ruddy god damn dinosaurs.

    The fact we haven't tracked barely any of the stars in the universe.

    All indicates you are 10 and its past your bed time.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Can we prevent it? No

    Therefore we are powerless...
    yes... powerless to stop other humans... not some vague explosion!
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    2. No I havn't. Mainly because the two events are mutually ******* exclusive. You got an interview for cambridge? unbelievable.

    3. wrong again. The asteroid I mentioned is less than a 1km wide. There are thousands of asteroids on catalogues which are being tracked everyday by the likes of nasa.
    2. See separate post.

    3. See New Scientist, September 26, 2009, pp. 30-33. 'Not only is there no plan for what to do when an asteroid hits, but our early-warning systems...are woefully inadequate.' and 'there is no plan for how to coordinate the activities of NASA, emergency planners, the US military and other parts of government.'
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    (Original post by binglebongle)
    2. See separate post.

    3. See New Scientist, September 26, 2009, pp. 30-33
    Are you also getting a feeling of satisfaction from this tit?

    He makes me look of average intelligence which is a first.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    The fact you got the ability for it to hit us wrong.

    The fact you got the scale of the damage it could do wrong.

    The fact you think light is the worst thing from a supernova.

    The fact you change your argument when you fail.

    The fact you think the only extinction to happen is the ruddy god damn dinosaurs.

    The fact we haven't tracked barely any of the stars in the universe.

    All indicates you are 10 and its past your bed time.
    When did I once say I got its ability to hit us wrong?
    When did I get the scale of damage wrong?
    Lol at point number 3. Light is the worst thing from a supernova you dumb ****. Maybe its 10 past your bedtime?
    The fact that I change my argument? My argument still stands fine. What about the fact that you still haven't given me a source for "We haven't accounted for 98% of stars in the sky" when I have asked you twice already?
    When did I say the only extinction that happened was the dinosaurs?
    You're right about the next one, but we have tracked well over 95% of the ones close to us, I would be daring enough to say 100% within 1000 light years easily.

    So yeah, maybe its 15 past your bedtime mr know it all?
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    That is really amazing. I read that if that star took the place of our sun. It would extend out to the orbit of saturn.
    Yeah, 7,000,000,000,000,000 Earth's to fill its volume.

    And there are probably far bigger stars out there.. which is crazy.
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    (Original post by binglebongle)
    2. See separate post.

    3. See New Scientist, September 26, 2009, pp. 30-33. 'Not only is there no plan for what to do when an asteroid hits, but our early-warning systems...are woefully inadequate.'
    That is nothing but a subjective opinion of someone quoted in the new scientist. It has been written like a newspaper, there to sell copies not actually inform.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Yeah, 7,000,000,000,000,000 Earth's to fill its volume.

    And there are probably far bigger stars out there.. which is crazy.

    Agreed. I honestly wished we lived longer than we do. Who knows what they will find as technology advances.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    When did I once say I got its ability to hit us wrong?
    When did I get the scale of damage wrong?
    Lol at point number 3. Light is the worst thing from a supernova you dumb ****. Maybe its 10 past your bedtime?
    The fact that I change my argument? My argument still stands fine. What about the fact that you still haven't given me a source for "We haven't accounted for 98% of stars in the sky" when I have asked you twice already?
    When did I say the only extinction that happened was the dinosaurs?
    You're right about the next one, but we have tracked well over 95% of the ones close to us, I would be daring enough to say 100% within 1000 light years easily.

    So yeah, maybe its 15 past your bedtime mr know it all?
    You said that it would not cause any damage to Earth.

    You said it would do barely anything to Earth from the distance.

    No, gamma rays are the worst thing from where we are.

    No, you get your argument screwed and you re-word it.

    You go look it up . Its probably less than 2% tbh that we have any sort of decent details on.

    You presumed I was on about the dinosaurs which shows great naivety.
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    That is nothing but a subjective opinion of someone quoted in the new scientist. It has been written like a newspaper, there to sell copies not actually inform.
    It's a report on a meeting of the people who work in the organisations that would be the ones responding to any potential impact. Seems like just the people who'd know as far as I'm concerned.

    That kind of assertion has to be backed up by actual evidence rather than falling back on blaming 'the media' without actually having a specific reason.
 
 
 
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