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    not that i plan on doing this, but just curious:
    can people switch from a law degree to a medical degree? after their first-year in law school if they studied science in high school [ib sciences]?
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    If they mit the requirements of the medical school, for undergraduate study, then yes. They would 'drop out' of law school for medical school. The first year of the LLB would have little value though - one would have to do the three year LLB or the medical course and then a one year conversion course to practice as a lawyer.
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    (Original post by jenna109)
    not that i plan on doing this, but just curious:
    can people switch from a law degree to a medical degree? after their first-year in law school if they studied science in high school [ib sciences]?
    You would have to go through the whole admissions process all over again though, i.e. do the UKCAT/BMAT, apply through UCAS, interviews and so on. Note that there is no guarantee you will be offered a places, especially as dropping out of a course will not count in your favour becayse it shows a lack of commitment to your studies. I reckon you should complete the law degree and then apply to graduate entry medicine.

    I did however find this on St. Andrews' website:

    "Undergraduates who are in FIRST year of an undergraduate programme will be considered if they have fulfilled our academic entry requirements before they began their undergraduate course and are continuing to perform at an excellent level."

    You can look for more details on their website:

    http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/prospectus/entry.aspx

    I'm not sure which other medical schools allow this.
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    (Original post by jenna109)
    not that i plan on doing this, but just curious:
    can people switch from a law degree to a medical degree? after their first-year in law school if they studied science in high school [ib sciences]?
    I don't understand one thing - for god's sake why have you applied for law this year? It makes absolutely no sense to me. And science subjects are not the main factor in your application.
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    well true that its tempting to fink that this is the work of some kiddie sitting in a posh school library who noticed that law and medicine are the 'esteemed subjects' in the Times Education guide, and that their posh school maccas all chose stuff like that, therefore they can only choose from law OR medicine and NUFFING ELSE, ignoring the thousand related professions that arent bigged up by posh skools.

    but its a bit judgmental to jump to conclusions, even if we cant fink why a would be 'ealthcare practioner would be tempted to do law as an alternative rather than 1,000 more similar professions that they casually ignore.

    even if it is a bit odd that you only EVER find these peeple on forums like this, sat in front of computers in a posh school somewhere wif nuffing to do but pick posh courses- you never meet people like this in real life and the working world.
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    (Original post by Hydromancer)
    You would have to go through the whole admissions process all over again though, i.e. do the UKCAT/BMAT, apply through UCAS, interviews and so on. Note that there is no guarantee you will be offered a places, especially as dropping out of a course will not count in your favour becayse it shows a lack of commitment to your studies. I reckon you should complete the law degree and then apply to graduate entry medicine.

    I did however find this on St. Andrews' website:

    "Undergraduates who are in FIRST year of an undergraduate programme will be considered if they have fulfilled our academic entry requirements before they began their undergraduate course and are continuing to perform at an excellent level."

    You can look for more details on their website:

    http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/prospectus/entry.aspx

    I'm not sure which other medical schools allow this.
    Hmm interesting.
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    (Original post by Butterflyleg)
    I don't understand one thing - for god's sake why have you applied for law this year? It makes absolutely no sense to me. And science subjects are not the main factor in your application.
    Becoming a lawyer does not neccessarily mean that one must have taken "arts/social studies" in high school. People interested in the sciences who pursue law often become medical malpractice/IP/personal injury lawyers.
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    (Original post by jenna109)
    Becoming a lawyer does not neccessarily mean that one must have taken "arts/social studies" in high school. People interested in the sciences who pursue law often become medical malpractice/IP/personal injury lawyers.
    Yeah, but you didn't get my point. Btw. you didn't answer my question.

    It's not weird to study chemistry, biology (etc.) and apply for law but it's weird to apply for law and then for medicine. And believe me, it's not that common.
    Why? Because it's not enough to be interested in science.

    If you really want to apply for medicine then it would be better to take a gap year.
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    (Original post by jenna109)
    not that i plan on doing this, but just curious:
    can people switch from a law degree to a medical degree? after their first-year in law school if they studied science in high school [ib sciences]?
    You can speak to the people in the medical school to see if they would make an exception. However it is unlikely because medical schools have a quota. But if someone has dropped out at the beginning of the year then you may have a slim chance of taking their place.

    I see you have applied to top and prestigious schools. Why don't you finish your law degree first and then apply for postgraduate medicine? You can do that when you are working in law, so if the medicine route does not fall through you can of course still be working in a law firm.

    It is uncommon though for law students to be interested in medicine and vice versa. I am one of those exceptions, I am a medic but am fascinated by law
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    (Original post by Gizmo!)
    well true that its tempting to fink that this is the work of some kiddie sitting in a posh school library who noticed that law and medicine are the 'esteemed subjects' in the Times Education guide, and that their posh school maccas all chose stuff like that, therefore they can only choose from law OR medicine and NUFFING ELSE, ignoring the thousand related professions that arent bigged up by posh skools.

    but its a bit judgmental to jump to conclusions, even if we cant fink why a would be 'ealthcare practioner would be tempted to do law as an alternative rather than 1,000 more similar professions that they casually ignore.

    even if it is a bit odd that you only EVER find these peeple on forums like this, sat in front of computers in a posh school somewhere wif nuffing to do but pick posh courses- you never meet people like this in real life and the working world.
    I think it's very odd that you think people can't genuinely be interested in both medicine and law to the extent that they'd want to study both of them.

    It's like those people who assume that everyone who applies to Oxford or Cambridge is only doing it for the prestige.
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    I think it's very odd that you think people can't genuinely be interested in both medicine and law to the extent that they'd want to study both of them.

    It's like those people who assume that everyone who applies to Oxford or Cambridge is only doing it for the prestige.
    Allow me to enlighten you, most people do it for the prestige. On TSR people constantly ask: which uni is better, more prestigious etc.
    Only few people actually want to study there for other reasons and prestigious is always one of them.

    And you can't be fully devoted to law & medicine - completely different career paths.
    OP has only subjects for example chemistry, biology but what about other factors?
    Well yes, I don't say that someone can't be interested in law and medicine but there's no need to study both. I have a real passion for biology, but for god's sake, it doesn't matter that I have to study both - law and biology.

    Imo, OP doesn't know what she wants to do with her life and she has just applied(or wants to apply) for the most prestigious courses as she has a high IB score.
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    It doesn't particuarly matter whether the person does it for the prestige or otherwise, as long as he or she is a good doctor or lawyer, then everything else is irrelevant.
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    (Original post by Comp_Genius)
    It doesn't particuarly matter whether the person does it for the prestige or otherwise, as long as he or she is a good doctor or lawyer, then everything else is irrelevant.
    Exactly xD lol
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    (Original post by Butterflyleg)
    Allow me to enlighten you, most people do it for the prestige. On TSR people constantly ask: which uni is better, more prestigious etc.
    Only few people actually want to study there for other reasons and prestigious is always one of them.
    And allow me to enlighten you - most of the people I see around me every day are here because they want to be, not because they think they should.

    As for saying only a few people only want to study there for other reasons, I've never heard such rubbish. There's a hell of a lot of differences between Oxford and Cambridge than some places, and some people surprisingly do actually apply for those.

    And you can't be fully devoted to law & medicine - completely different career paths.
    Please explain to me why the field of medico-law exists, and why then it's possible to do a law conversion course as a medicine graduate.
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    And allow me to enlighten you - most of the people I see around me every day are here because they want to be, not because they think they should.

    As for saying only a few people only want to study there for other reasons, I've never heard such rubbish. There's a hell of a lot of differences between Oxford and Cambridge than some places, and some people surprisingly do actually apply for those.



    Please explain to me why the field of medico-law exists, and why then it's possible to do a law conversion course as a medicine graduate.
    You can obviously do medical law without the MBBS, but I think converting with a medical degree and experience will be more lucrative...
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    You can obviously do medical law without the MBBS, but I think converting with a medical degree and experience will be more lucrative...
    Well yeah, but if a field exists which seems the perfect marriage between the two subjects then it's pretty obvious that the two disciplines don't necessarily have to have completely different career paths.
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    Has nobody mentioned H.M. Coroners yet?
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    And allow me to enlighten you - most of the people I see around me every day are here because they want to be, not because they think they should.

    As for saying only a few people only want to study there for other reasons, I've never heard such rubbish. There's a hell of a lot of differences between Oxford and Cambridge than some places, and some people surprisingly do actually apply for those.



    Please explain to me why the field of medico-law exists, and why then it's possible to do a law conversion course as a medicine graduate.
    (Original post by Wangers)
    You can obviously do medical law without the MBBS, but I think converting with a medical degree and experience will be more lucrative...

    So what career options are there for doctors who are legally qualified?
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    (Original post by Comp_Genius)
    So what career options are there for doctors who are legally qualified?
    Obviously it would be a massive boost to any career to have done those two subjects. I would guess that not so much in medicine, but it's certainly of some worth in law. Barristers' Chambers place a lot of emphasis on life experience.
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    (Original post by Comp_Genius)
    So what career options are there for doctors who are legally qualified?
    Well its more about legals who are medically qualified. Alot of Trust management positions are medics who then took a legal/management course and flew the nest. Of course just as many are management consultancies etc..
 
 
 
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