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    which of these fields would you say has the better long term oppurtunites in terms of promotion , salary and general enjoyability.

    Personally i think Advisory would be the most enjoyable , but assurance is also less office based.. but i feel tax and assurance are slightly more ticking boxes and more admin jobs.

    Opinions?
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    (Original post by boodeny)
    which of these fields would you say has the better long term oppurtunites in terms of promotion , salary and general enjoyability.

    Personally i think Advisory would be the most enjoyable , but assurance is also less office based.. but i feel tax and assurance are slightly more ticking boxes and more admin jobs.

    Opinions?
    Have you ever worked in tax? If it was such a "ticking boxes" job the companies would it themselves.
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    Depends on the firm. Generally, a lot of Auditors (assurance) will move to a different service line/into industry after qualification. There is probably more competition for advisory that tax.
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    Advisory is pretty good, especially financial restructurings and forensics. But if you join audit and express interest in other areas, you're quite likely to be seconded.
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    Advisory is more competitive in general and slightly better paid as well. if you like advisory/consulting type of work and the ability to do so then by all means try advisory i.e. strategy, corporate finance, performance consulting (quite hot these days in PwC) etc.

    Assurance gives you a grounding in company fundamentals and is a good starting point for your future career should you decide to move to another career or stay. Yes it requires lot of travelling which suits some people and not to others.

    Tax is very wide, for instance indirect tax is very legal based and requires a good language skills. In turn corporate tax requires less grinding of legal side but still a bit, but more on the tax returns etc. It depends what you like most. Often tax career means you are pigeonholed in tax as you do tax qualifications.

    Unlike Assurance and Advisory you can do broader qualification in ACA/CA which are far more better when you want to change your career in future.
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    (Original post by Neocortex)
    Advisory is more competitive in general and slightly better paid as well. if you like advisory/consulting type of work and the ability to do so then by all means try advisory i.e. strategy, corporate finance, performance consulting (quite hot these days in PwC) etc.

    Assurance gives you a grounding in company fundamentals and is a good starting point for your future career should you decide to move to another career or stay. Yes it requires lot of travelling which suits some people and not to others.

    Tax is very wide, for instance indirect tax is very legal based and requires a good language skills. In turn corporate tax requires less grinding of legal side but still a bit, but more on the tax returns etc. It depends what you like most. Often tax career means you are pigeonholed in tax as you do tax qualifications.

    Unlike Assurance and Advisory you can do broader qualification in ACA/CA which are far more better when you want to change your career in future.

    Thats been reallly usefull, really appreciate it
    i think thats the fundamental flaw in tax is not getting the ACA, which is in my eyes one of the most valuable things!

    Cheers pal
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    (Original post by boodeny)
    Thats been reallly usefull, really appreciate it
    i think thats the fundamental flaw in tax is not getting the ACA, which is in my eyes one of the most valuable things!

    Cheers pal
    In my experience you won't usually be disadvantaged in terms of qualifications in tax (within the Big 4, at least), as the usual route is to take any tax qualifications (such as CTA) in addition to, rather than instead of, broader ones like the ACA/CA.
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    (Original post by boodeny)
    Thats been reallly usefull, really appreciate it
    i think thats the fundamental flaw in tax is not getting the ACA, which is in my eyes one of the most valuable things!

    Cheers pal
    I get CA and CTA with KPMG.
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    PwC do ACA in Tax, with an option to do CTA after.
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    (Original post by Kemik)
    I get CA and CTA with KPMG.
    :ditto: with EY.

    Anyone care to confirm what Deloitte's policy is, as they're the only one of the Big 4 not yet represented? It looks like GT offer both the ACA and CTA as well (source).
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    At Deloitte all the Tax grads (that i know of anyway) are doing the ACA, and then they'll do the specific tax qualifications further down the line.
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    (Original post by cahoot)
    At Deloitte all the Tax grads (that i know of anyway) are doing the ACA, and then they'll do the specific tax qualifications further down the line.
    I think we've pretty conclusively disproved that being in tax is a disadvantage in terms of qualifications, then! :p: (within the top-tier firms, at least)
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    so wait, you do your ACA/CA and then you have to do more exams? I just have case left and when I get past that I never want to sit another exam in the rest of my life.
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    (Original post by theis)
    so wait, you do your ACA/CA and then you have to do more exams? I just have case left and when I get past that I never want to sit another exam in the rest of my life.
    Depends what you want to do :P For restructuring you'll probably need JIEB, for tax CTA, etc.
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    (Original post by theis)
    so wait, you do your ACA/CA and then you have to do more exams? I just have case left and when I get past that I never want to sit another exam in the rest of my life.
    With EY at least, you have the option to do more exams - it's not mandatory. Plus, having the CA qualification gives exemptions from some of the CTA exams.
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    (Original post by Illusionary)
    With EY at least, you have the option to do more exams - it's not mandatory. Plus, having the CA qualification gives exemptions from some of the CTA exams.
    Is it the same if you have ACA and then want to take CTA? Do you get the exemptions as well?
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    (Original post by 2late)
    Is it the same if you have ACA and then want to take CTA? Do you get the exemptions as well?
    http://www.tax.org.uk/attach.pl/63/1...2010%20WEB.pdf

    Yep - read page seven at that link.
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    (Original post by Illusionary)
    http://www.tax.org.uk/attach.pl/63/1...2010%20WEB.pdf

    Yep - read page seven at that link.
    Awesome, thanks!
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    Hi guys,

    I have a first round interview coming up for assurance graduate with EY.
    But, I am more interested in Advisory (I know that sounds indecisive, and I probably was when I applied.....).
    Now, I have 2 options:-
    1) Call up the HR and ask if my application can be transfered into advisory (in which case
    HR will question my decisiveness & most probably won't allow the transfer. Also risk of
    loosing the assurance interview)
    2) Just withdraw the assurance application & apply freshly for the advisory (will have to go
    through the whole process again)

    What will you guys suggest will have a better chance? thanks,

    PS: In EY, the website says that in the graduate advisory (financial services advisory), you "may" study for ACA. Does that mean that it not compulsory to do ACA in advisory with EY?
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    (Original post by browncargos)
    Hi guys,

    I have a first round interview coming up for assurance graduate with EY.
    But, I am more interested in Advisory (I know that sounds indecisive, and I probably was when I applied.....).
    Now, I have 2 options:-
    1) Call up the HR and ask if my application can be transfered into advisory (in which case
    HR will question my decisiveness & most probably won't allow the transfer. Also risk of
    loosing the assurance interview)
    2) Just withdraw the assurance application & apply freshly for the advisory (will have to go
    through the whole process again)

    What will you guys suggest will have a better chance? thanks,

    PS: In EY, the website says that in the graduate advisory (financial services advisory), you "may" study for ACA. Does that mean that it not compulsory to do ACA in advisory with EY?
    I'd say stick with your current application for three reasons:
    1) One that you mentioned, i.e. indecisiveness
    2) Assurance has more vacancies
    3) You may have the opportunity to transfer/ be seconded into another area during your time at EY, even during the ACA stage (that's what KPMG offer at least)
 
 
 
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