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Soya Protein - erm, what do I do with it? watch

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    So, I'm a vegetarian and I was bored of people telling me I was going to either die from lack of protein, or be fat because I eat carbs. Funnily enough, neither has occurred yet. But anyway, I bought this pack of soya protein, the mince kind, thinking of putting it in a milkshake or something but then realised it's meant to be used for savoury stuff. I'm not into fake meat, so what do I do with this stuff?
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    Is this the dried soya mince stuff? Or like fake frozen/fresh mince?

    I was thinking you could maybe use it in very small quantities, so you won't really notice the fake meat-ness of the whole thing. I'm doing a shepherd's pie tomorrow which has a sauce of lentils, carrots, red wine and tomatoes as the bottom layer, and I'll probably add a bit of dried soya mince (rehydrated with vegetable stock) as well, but not so much that it'll be really obvious amongst all the other ingredients. I did this before and it wasn't very noticeable.

    So if you're making a pasta sauce or something, that's mostly vegetables, you could add it in small quantities to add protein to your meals, without them suddenly becoming a predominantly fake-meat dish.

    (For putting in a milkshake or whatever, I think you can get some kind of powder - my friend was telling me about this the other day. She adds it to veggie curries, soups, and stuff like that, if she's not using much in the way of pulses in them.)
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    About people telling you you're gonna die from lack of protein... This is a complete myth!
    If anything, the problem in the west is too much protein! There is protein in lots of foods, including wheat, rice, potatos, milk, soy milk, beans, vegetables, cheese, nuts...

    http://www.pcrm.org/health/veginfo/v...ian_foods.html scroll down to common concerns

    Anyway, about soy protein...
    It's good mainly in traditional English food recipes replacing meat mince in recipies like spaghetti bolognaise, shepards pie, cottage pie, any pot pies you may you can add to vegetables sauces. I sometimes use a few teaspoons just to add more texture to burritos or fajitahs along with other vegetables and spices in tortilla or corn wraps.
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    I do it like this: Firstly I cook it until boiling in a vegetable broth, it has to be nice and salty. Then I leave it for 10 minutes to soak, then I strain the soya pieces into a cup. I pour a little bit of olive oil and onion in a pan and add the soya protein. Fry until the pieces are a little bit harder and "meatier".

    Here you can choose what to do. If making pasta, I just add a little bit of tomato paste and some herbs, and it makes a lovely sauce. My brother thought it was real meat
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    (Original post by lizfairy)
    About people telling you you're gonna die from lack of protein... This is a complete myth!
    If anything, the problem in the west is too much protein! There is protein in lots of foods, including wheat, rice, potatos, milk, soy milk, beans, vegetables, cheese, nuts...

    http://www.pcrm.org/health/veginfo/v...ian_foods.html scroll down to common concerns

    Anyway, about soy protein...
    It's good mainly in traditional English food recipes replacing meat mince in recipies like spaghetti bolognaise, shepards pie, cottage pie, any pot pies you may you can add to vegetables sauces. I sometimes use a few teaspoons just to add more texture to burritos or fajitahs along with other vegetables and spices in tortilla or corn wraps.
    I don't think there is a problem with too much protein at all.
 
 
 
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