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    Why is law the most popular degree?
    Do people like it for the status that goes with being a lawyer? Or are most generally interested in law as an academic subject?

    I recently bought a book called 'Learning the law' and in the very first chapter it was almost recommending people should not enter the career, and consider other avenues such as ICT solutions.

    Obviously the commercialisation of law from movies depicting the poor ethnic minority in an epic struggle to get into the elite universities, battling against adversity, has given law an appeal to most. Consequently there is a status associated with it (braniac, rich, successful, superior?)- is this the reason why it's so oversubscribed?

    Another reason may be the relatively straight forward and generously paid career path which is mapped out after a law degree offering a definitive career.
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    It's a good degree. There may also be people who are doing it for the same reason you are :p:
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    (Original post by Jakko247)
    Why is law the most popular degree?
    Do people like it for the status that goes with being a lawyer? Or are most generally interested in law as an academic subject?

    I recently bought a book called 'Learning the law' and in the very first chapter it was almost recommending people should not enter the career, and consider other avenues such as ICT solutions.

    Obviously the commercialisation of law from movies depicting the poor ethnic minority in an epic struggle to get into the elite universities, battling against adversity, has given law an appeal to most. Consequently there is a status associated with it (braniac, rich, successful, superior?)- is this the reason why it's so oversubscribed?

    Another reason may be the relatively straight forward and generously paid career path which is mapped out after a law degree offering a definitive career.
    I think today like Economics if you will it is not the fact that people want to become Economists or Lawyers but the degree itself is valuable to most employers. In the sense that a Law degree "looks good" to an employer if you cath my drift. Rather than them wanting to enter the career.
    That is just my perosnal opinion on subjects like Economics, Law and Chemical Engineering etc. They are impressive degrees to have and hence in a slight sense make you more employable.
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    Probably because it has a good standing as an academic subject but several universities offer law courses with very low entry requirements. Possibly also linked to the misconception that law is a vocational degree rather than an academic one and that a law degree will make you a 'lawyer'. I know several people who are undertaking law degrees at low ranked universities on this basis.
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    the salaries are higher if you enter the legal providing, providing that you study at a reputable institute
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    ££
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    i am doing it because i love the subject, and because i couldn't imagine doing anything else, but the money is no bad thing either.
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    Its because the only three jobs that exist to asian parents are: Doctor, Lawyer, Investment Banker
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    Alot of people obviously want to become Parasites... i mean, erm.. Lawyers. :mmm:
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    (Original post by Smeh)
    ££
    this
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    (Original post by Smeh)
    ££
    This. For most, the prospect of getting a high-flying law career with a "Magic Circle" law firm is incredibly attractive, simply for the remuneration. And though comparatively few will actually succeed in that goal, I'd hardly call a Solicitor's salary, poor.

    It's the same thing with IB. You don't go to your parents when you're 5 or 6 and say, "Mummy, when I grow up, I want to be a Lawyer or a Hedge Fund Manager."
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    Because it's an interesting subject.
    Although I agree that there's a fair few people who take it soley for the reputation and the ££££'s rather than because they actually really want to. Yesterday for example, there was girl lin my exam who sat there for 15 minutes, wrote a page and then left half way through, and I barley see her in lectures. You can just tell which ones on your course don't actually want to be there/ took it for the wrong reasons.
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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    This. For most, the prospect of getting a high-flying law career with a "Magic Circle" law firm is incredibly attractive, simply for the remuneration. And though comparatively few will actually succeed in that goal, I'd hardly call a Solicitor's salary, poor.

    It's the same thing with IB. You don't go to your parents when you're 5 or 6 and say, "Mummy, when I grow up, I want to be a Lawyer or a Hedge Fund Manager."
    Partly because when you're 6 you have no clue what a Hedge Fund Manager is... and it is not only about the money - it is also about doing something exclusive (well, it is no longer exclusive, but it still has that aura of being a proper course along with medicine, physics, maths and almost nothing else). Because you just know that at a family meeting, saying 'I study Law at [insert Russel Group uni]' is gonna make everyone shut up.
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    (Original post by DAFOne)
    Because you just know that at a family meeting, saying 'I study Law at [insert Russel Group uni]' is gonna make everyone shut up.
    Maybe not shut up, but it will impress most people you will meet in your life and I think this is one of the main contributing factors as to why people take it!
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    TWO WORDS:

    Alan Shore :ahee:
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    I thought Science was the most popular?

    Science subjects made up 41% of the degrees awarded in 2008-09, divided equally between men and women.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8462318.stm
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    The book says "if you are unsure" about entering law, then consider other professions...
    The vast majority of people I know do law because they find it interesting, being the concrete of society and all
    That said, I don't know why I did law. I just liked it at A Level.
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    (Original post by DAFOne)
    Because you just know that at a family meeting, saying 'I study Law at [insert Russel Group uni]' is gonna make everyone shut up.
    Can't say I agree with that. Its true law has good standing as a solid academic subject but I don't think that its necessarily anymore 'impressive' or has anymore 'wow factor' than any other academic subject tbh especially just being studied at a Russel Group uni which encompasses may universities some of which aren't that highly ranked...

    I think that this is also part of the misconception I talked about earlier. A law degree does not qualify you to practice law its just a stepping stone to doing so and compared with any other undergraduate degree only really saves you a year of study and the associated costs.
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    I'm not sure why people assume anybody who wants to become a lawyer must be either highly materialistic or asian. There are lots of areas of the law which pay quite poorly in comparison to other professional jobs (many criminal lawyers, for example, earn less than police officers) and, although I can't believe I'm having to say this, plenty of lawyers come from non-asian backgrounds. As MV has said, there is a lot of money in corporate law and particularly amongst the top city firms but actually half of all lawyers in the city have a background in a non-legal subject and more than half of all people who embark upon a law degree have no intention of 1.) working in the city and 2.) practising corporate law. Indeed, many law students have absolutely no intention of practising any form of law at all.

    Law is popular, OP, for a number of reasons: it's a highly respected degree to have and it opens a considerable number of doors not just in law-related fields. It's vocational and relevant and, for the most part, a pretty interesting subject to read. It's also a subject which not many people will have studied before and, for some people, it's sometimes quite nice to start a degree in a subject which you have no pre-conceived ideas or assumptions about.
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    i only came to realise the popularity of law after applying for it.
    I always thought Economics was more popular, or maybe Medicine, Engineering etc.
    Butyeah, I too was shocked to see that its THE MOST popular subject.
 
 
 
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