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    The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.
    William Shakespeare
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    (Original post by Lit Up!)
    that's pathetic.
    Sad but true.
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    TVB Survivor's Law :woo:
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    (Original post by TerryTerry)
    a lot of people have no idea what they want to study at uni, for instance, if they've become disillusioned with their A-level subjects.
    I would say this is an important factor that many people may have trouble with. Ans the fact that some schools forget the individual student and almost ignore the students personal potential.
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    (Original post by Jakko247)
    Why is law the most popular degree?
    Do people like it for the status that goes with being a lawyer? Or are most generally interested in law as an academic subject?
    It's not, M1* degrees are about 60th if comparing applicant/places ratio. On raw applicants it's second to B7* (nursing degrees).
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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    This. For most, the prospect of getting a high-flying law career with a "Magic Circle" law firm is incredibly attractive, simply for the remuneration. And though comparatively few will actually succeed in that goal, I'd hardly call a Solicitor's salary, poor.

    It's the same thing with IB. You don't go to your parents when you're 5 or 6 and say, "Mummy, when I grow up, I want to be a Lawyer or a Hedge Fund Manager."
    It's not true, I was a pretty weirdo and I wanted to be Lawyer xD
    Maybe because I wanted to be like my dad :p:
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    (Original post by ChrisBan)
    I thought Science was the most popular?



    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/8462318.stm
    Science is the most popular, however science isn't a course, it's a group of many courses which includes biology, chemistry, physics, molecular biology, zoology, animal behaviour, chemical engineering, materials science, molecular physics, pharmacology, pharmacy, pharmaceutical science, neuroscience, engineering... and probably about 10-20 more. Obviously if you add up everyone doing that, that is more people than everyone doing Law, which is only one course.
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    Most people who have managed AAA-AAB at AS may at least consider Law. I looked at it before quickly realising 'not for me'.
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    I think it all depends.If you go to a decent uni (top 10) , 15, the least, graduate with a first, have great ECs, you have a pretty good chance for finding a well-paid job (40-50k) just after you graduate.However, if you are a mediocre student, go to a mediocre law school ranked 30-100, barely graduate with 3 or 2:1 in the very best, you are doomed to mediocrity.You will earn sth about 18-25k as someone above said, and will have average life which you can easily have by working something less stressful.
    This summer I was to London and spoke with an above-average firm partner.This is exactly what he said.
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    I think it all depends.If you go to a decent uni (top 10) , 15, the least, graduate with a first, have great ECs, you have a pretty good chance for finding a well-paid job (40-50k) just after you graduate.However, if you are a mediocre student, go to a mediocre law school ranked 30-100, barely graduate with 3 or 2:1 in the very best, you are doomed to mediocrity.You will earn sth about 18-25k as someone above said, and will have average life which you can easily have by working something less stressful.
    This summer I was to London and spoke with an above-average firm partner.This is exactly what he said.
    Hmm. I would like a definitive list of these top 15 uni's.
    Do you consider that Liverpool or Sheffield is in this top 15, or even QMUL?
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    (Original post by Jakko247)
    Hmm. I would like a definitive list of these top 15 uni's.
    Do you consider that Liverpool or Sheffield is in this top 15, or even QMUL?
    QMUL is considered 9th by Times and GUardian, it is located in london, definitely top 15, to say the least.

    When he told me top 15, he didnt mean only 15 universities, but we all agree that there is a certain group of schools that cant stop you from going to a top firm, but after this group, it is going to be hard.I dont want to start the highly controversial topic about what are the top universities besides Oxbridge,LSE,UCL,Kings,Notts,Dur ham,Warwick
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    QMUL is considered 9th by Times and GUardian, it is located in london, definitely top 15, to say the least.

    When he told me top 15, he didnt mean only 15 universities, but we all agree that there is a certain group of schools that cant stop you from going to a top firm, but after this group, it is going to be hard.I dont want to start the highly controversial topic about what are the top universities besides Oxbridge,LSE,UCL,Kings,Notts,Dur ham.
    You're missing Warwick from that list :P!
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    (Original post by Jakko247)
    You're missing Warwick from that list :P!
    All right, my bad, I added Warwick
    BTW, a friend of mine got an offer from Warwick for Mathematics and Business studies.I thought Warwick hasnt contacted anyone else, though different departments probably have different policies
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    All right, my bad, I added Warwick
    BTW, a friend of mine got an offer from Warwick for Mathematics and Business studies.I thought Warwick hasnt contacted anyone else, though different departments probably have different policies
    Haha indeed yes! I have yet to recieve a predicted rejection :p:
    However, it is a top university and they don't (to my knowledge) examine applicants like the other top universities (atleast they didn't require me to sit the LNAT, unlike some far less prestigious universities) so their in-house selection process will be far more rigorous and take into account broader criteria so it will take longer! & they are really keen on an equal consideration for applications and the deadline for UCAS has been extended to the 22nd of January!

    I do wonder though whether they give all applications a provisional overlook and root out 'unsuitable' candidates and inform them quickly of a rejection? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Jakko247)
    Haha indeed yes! I have yet to recieve a predicted rejection :p:
    However, it is a top university and they don't (to my knowledge) examine applicants like the other top universities (atleast they didn't require me to sit the LNAT, unlike some far less prestigious universities) so their in-house selection process will be far more rigorous and take into account broader criteria so it will take longer! & they are really keen on an equal consideration for applications and the deadline for UCAS has been extended to the 22nd of January!

    I do wonder though whether they give all applications a provisional overlook and root out 'unsuitable' candidates and inform them quickly of a rejection? :rolleyes:
    Best of luck, mate.My predicted grade is gpa 5.50 out of 6.00 and its not perfect, although very difficult to obtain in my educational system.Thats why I hope my LNAT will help me with my Notts and Durham applications
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    (Original post by TerryTerry)
    I don't think many realise what they're in for and what the other options are.

    Law at university is not vocational, despite what someone said earlier - it's an academic degree. I think some people don't want to take a conversion course at the end of their degree, I think we're in a socially conditioned rush to be older and get to further stages in life: school, uni, work (associate, partner, equity partner...), marriage, retirement. Also because it's a very hard degree, hence it makes you very employable and because a lot of people have no idea what they want to study at uni, for instance, if they've become disillusioned with their A-level subjects.
    I don't see how it isn't a vocational subject. I know KCL in particular flag law up as an academic discipline - but this has a very practical meaning. For instance, when I sit an exam, I do so thinking like a lawyer, approaching the problem some-what like a lawyer, using the law a lawyer would use. How is that not vocational?

    The LPC and BVC seem to be quite procedural, and an LLB or GDL is needed to enter those courses, so it clearly has a very vocational side.
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    (Original post by ChrisBan)
    Very good point indeed, it probably includes stuff like "Surf Science" :yes:

    Just out of interest, what can you do with a law degree. I think everyone's first assumptions are that it is only to become a Lawyer, but I imagine there are a lot more options than just this open to you?
    You can do basically anything with a law degree apart from becoming a scientific researcher or a doctor/vet/dentist.
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    (Original post by mj2010x)
    I don't see how it isn't a vocational subject. I know KCL in particular flag law up as an academic discipline - but this has a very practical meaning. For instance, when I sit an exam, I do so thinking like a lawyer, approaching the problem some-what like a lawyer, using the law a lawyer would use. How is that not vocational?

    The LPC and BVC seem to be quite procedural, and an LLB or GDL is needed to enter those courses, so it clearly has a very vocational side.
    History is not vocational but you use the history a historian would use. I don't want to get into an argument over semantics, I can understand how it may seem confusing but vocational means non academic, pertaining totally to the profession and usually procedural knowledge.

    http://www.sra.org.uk/sra/regulatory...ions-2009.page
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    (Original post by TerryTerry)
    History is not vocational but you use the history a historian would use. I don't want to get into an argument over semantics, I can understand how it may seem confusing but vocational means non academic, pertaining totally to the profession and usually procedural knowledge.

    http://www.sra.org.uk/sra/regulatory...ions-2009.page
    Yes, but many people who enter history do not become historians. Moreover, a historian is an academic position not a vocational one.
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    (Original post by mj2010x)
    I don't see how it isn't a vocational subject. I know KCL in particular flag law up as an academic discipline - but this has a very practical meaning. For instance, when I sit an exam, I do so thinking like a lawyer, approaching the problem some-what like a lawyer, using the law a lawyer would use. How is that not vocational?

    The LPC and BVC seem to be quite procedural, and an LLB or GDL is needed to enter those courses, so it clearly has a very vocational side.
    Its slightly more vocational than something like History, but law degrees are still extremely academic in focus. Even at the end of your degree you will still have very little idea how to help people with most real-life problems. Many of the things you study have little relevance for practice. Take contract law. Many of the things you study - lets take offer and acceptance, consideration and intent to create legal relations - have very little relevance in the real world. There are very few (any?) situations where a practicing lawyer would need to know about these principles - are agreement, consideration and intent ever really in doubt in any significant context? Hence why the most modern cases you learn about in these areas are from the 80s. Similarly, you'll finish your Land Law course without a bloody clue about how conveyancing works or how to do important things like check unregistered land for hidden interests. Nor will you know anything about the standard contracts used (with slight amendments - you use a cover sheet indicating where terms are different to that in the standard form contract) in pretty much every land transaction.

    The LLB/GDL requirement is more about developing legal thinking skills and a general introduction to how the most basic legal principles work more than anything else, though you will build a solid foundations. The LPC/BVC is about a lot more than just procedure, though obviously procedure is pretty crucial.
 
 
 

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