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    (Original post by riiight.)
    Actually, it looks like you've made them up for a laugh.

    According to your own source the median salary for 10-19 years experience is between £59k and £94k.
    That's for a cty solicitor dear.

    I was referring to the UK mean for all solicitors.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    That's for a cty solicitor dear.

    I was referring to the UK mean for all solicitors.
    I was merely referring to the reference you provided us with, dear.

    Let me know if you want any advice on how to copy/paste. You appear to have some confusion.
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    Of course !A friend of mine got a law degree from Oxford and now works in the legal department of a famous London bank.She is neither solicitor nor barrister but makes pretty good money for a 24-5 year old.
    A law degree opens many doors
    There is nothing I would detest more in this life than working for a bank. At the moment I'm fluctuating between entertaining fantasies of academia and actually going down the more traditional route and going for the bar. We'll see I suppose.

    And OMG: just noticed that Ronald Dworkin is Emeritus Professor of Jurisprudence at UCL. :coma:
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    (Original post by ParadigmShift)
    There is nothing I would detest more in this life than working for a bank. At the moment I'm fluctuating between entertaining fantasies of academia and actually going down the more traditional route and going for the bar. We'll see I suppose.

    And OMG: just noticed that Ronald Dworkin is Emeritus Professor of Jurisprudence at UCL. :coma:
    He spends most of his time teaching at NYU and doing research, though. Bernard Crick is emeritus here and I've not heard a word about him in four years studying at Edinburgh.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    That's for a cty solicitor dear.

    I was referring to the UK mean for all solicitors.
    That's been addressed. Don't patronise him for using the incorrect link you posted, "dear".
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    He spends most of his time teaching at NYU and doing research, though. Bernard Crick is emeritus here and I've not heard a word about him in four years studying at Edinburgh.
    *delusions of grandeur crushed*

    :p: Still though. It's pretty cool. It seems as if he does occasionally give talks at the university though, as few and far between as they may be...
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    (Original post by ParadigmShift)
    *delusions of grandeur crushed*

    :p: Still though. It's pretty cool. It seems as if he does occasionally give talks at the university though, as few and far between as they may be...
    I'm sure there's loads of brilliant faculty at UCL, though. You just haven't heard of them b/c they're not titans like Dworkin, or because they specialise in less glamorous areas of law than jurisprudence and legal theory. Have you read Law's Empire, btw? I'm still trying to figure out what to make of it...
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    I'm sure there's loads of brilliant faculty at UCL, though. You just haven't heard of them b/c they're not titans like Dworkin, or because they specialise in less glamorous areas of law than jurisprudence and legal theory. Have you read Law's Empire, btw? I'm still trying to figure out what to make of it...
    Oh certainly, it's just when you see a name like that... :coma: I read a work by Nigel Simmonds in which Dworkin's philosophies were summarised addressed in quite an interesting fashion, so a short while ago I ordered Law's Empire off Amazon. :ninja: Another reason to look forward to the end of exams. :yes:
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    I chose law because I'm interested in morality and the whys and wherefores relating to the rules that govern us (inspired by distopian futures as presented in 1984 and A Clockwork Orange, two of my favourite books). I also think it's something that I would be good at. The only other subject I would have considered was philosophy but I didn't take it at A level because I dislike my proselytising Catholic teachers.

    Obviously there is also a perception that it leads to well payed jobs and it has a certain prestige. I do like the fact that it appears to afford you particular options because otherwise I know I would just float aimlessly through life.
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    Because saying you're studying law to a loser who's only after you for sex makes him back down, on a night out. Apparently law's intimidating to the young drunken chavs. :P I think that's a good enough reason, or you could just lie. Whatever. :P

    I love law, I absolutely soak it up, it's so engaging and interesting and fiery. I couldn't be doing anything else. I was talking to a girl once who said her father made her take it. And like others have said it's a well respected degree. I hadn't realised there would be so many people applying though.
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    (Original post by Aubydoll)
    Because saying you're studying law to a loser who's only after you for sex makes him back down, on a night out. Apparently law's intimidating to the young drunken chavs. :P I think that's a good enough reason, or you could just lie. Whatever. :P
    Haha, i've never heard that reason before!

    "oh ****, she's intellectual, maybe she wants a proper conversation!" :eek3:

    Enough to put any chav off.
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    (Original post by Aubydoll)

    I love law, I absolutely soak it up, it's so engaging and interesting and fiery. I couldn't be doing anything else. I was talking to a girl once who said her father made her take it. And like others have said it's a well respected degree. I hadn't realised there would be so many people applying though.
    Do you feel disgruntled or cheated regarding the oversubscribed nature of law then, considering many people choose it for the wrong reasons? consequently reducing your honest and genuine aspirations/prospects?

    :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by riiight.)
    Haha, i've never heard that reason before!

    "oh ****, she's intellectual, maybe she wants a proper conversation!" :eek3:

    Enough to put any chav off.
    Haha, well yeah. I was in some vile place on Monday night and the uni which the city has is absolutely crap, I think he must have thought I originally studied there. And so I was waiting for my friend outside the toliets and this guy was all like 'hiii, whats your name' so I gave him a fake name, then he asked where I was studying and I actually said my college, and then he was like ':O ME TOO' clearly wasn't, then asked what I was studying and I just said law. I figured he was too drunk to distinguish between college and uni but it made him scarper pretty quickly. :rolleyes: Apparently it can come across as intimidating, although it certainly has its advantages. :P

    (Original post by Jakko247)
    Do you feel disgruntled or cheated regarding the oversubscribed nature of law then, considering many people choose it for the wrong reasons? consequently reducing your honest and genuine aspirations/prospects?
    Tough question. I think you shouldn't go to university until you're nineteen because no one knows what they want to do, well people do but not as many as nineteen. I took a year out between GCSE and A Level to do acting for a year and that made my aspirations/ambitions for something more challenging and academic such as law more pronounced, and I definetly knew what I wanted to do. I think people who just take it for the sake of taking it don't really have that time to think about what they want to do. I don't think it puts me at a disadvantage entirely. It might increase the competition, a lot of who have amazzzing grades, but I think whichever uni I go to I'll still be the best law student in the country, no world The competition isn't stopping me from performing, it's just making me perform better and rise to the challenge.

    Competition doesn't put you at a disadvantage, you put yourself at one, or give yourself one. My GCSE grades are a disadvantage because they're not all A*. On the other hand I raised my game by having involvement, if not founding, a lot of clubs, societies, responsibilities (class rep, etc etc), volunteering, law related work experience, jobs etc. One of my AS grades probably left me at a disadvantage but in my defence someone I was close to had just died which knocked me off the rails for a little while, and now I'm working triple as hard to get my three A's at A2 (It will be done!). I make my own future, if some uni's don't like my grades they can get over it and reject me and I'll get over them and move on. If they take in P/S, reference and other such things into account and like me then good. There's not much I can do now so there's no need feel cheated. Who cares about competition, I'll just own them anyway, even the 14 A* kids at GCSE. Positivity!!!

    Ask me this question again when I get rejected from Durham and I'm sure the answer will be very different.

    Edit;;;oooh that book in your first post. Is it any good? I boughts it for £2 (BARGAIN!) but I'm waiting for it to arrive. :P
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    (Original post by Aubydoll)



    Edit;;;oooh that book in your first post. Is it any good? I boughts it for £2 (BARGAIN!) but I'm waiting for it to arrive. :P
    Haha it's straight to the point type of reading and just introduces the basic concepts (judges, legal systems etc) its quite a small book i've not read it all yet, just looked through it briefly! :P
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    Bslforever
    Exalted and Worshipped Member Join Date: May 2009
    Location: In My House (wow, im so original)
    Posts: 1,130

    Re: Why is law so oversubscribed?

    Its because the only three jobs that exist to asian parents are: Doctor, Lawyer, Investment Banker

    Its not only Asian parents but African parents aswell...
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    (Original post by Dysandlaw)
    Bslforever
    Exalted and Worshipped Member Join Date: May 2009
    Location: In My House (wow, im so original)
    Posts: 1,130

    Re: Why is law so oversubscribed?

    Its because the only three jobs that exist to asian parents are: Doctor, Lawyer, Investment Banker

    Its not only Asian parents but African parents aswell...
    True. I may also add Businessman,but what you have said were pretty much of it.
 
 
 
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