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    Howdy. I'm currently doing AS maths, physics, chemistry, geology and German, and am targeted for (at the moment at least) As, which is in theory entirely feasible, but it's too early to be sure.
    Basically, I want to enter a line of work that allows me to travel quite a lot, allows me to earn quite a lot and makes use of science and maths. I wouldn't mind working with the British Antarctic Survey, or other similar organisations. I'm just a little unsure as to what degree course to take though.

    Currently physics is my big love, but physics degrees look a little broad (so postgrad specialisation looks essential -correct me if I'm wrong) and the earning power of a physicist looks good, but a little less impressive when compared to more specialised degrees. I have also read that physics graduates go on to do all sorts of things, especially financial work, and although I'm sure the earning potential there is huge, it just sounds plain boring.
    On the other hand, geophysics is more focused and earning power seems to have a larger range, but does it mean sacrificing "pure" physics and just focusing on earth science? And is it as transferable as physics, or does a geophysics graduate only have the option of engineering/construction work or exploration work? Are there many jobs for geophysicists out there? (in the UK or abroad).

    The reason I ask it that my AS Geology has just turned into fact memorisation. There's little in the way of fundamental theory supported by maths, as you would get in physics, and this has made me a bit iffy about doing an earth science degree, which is what I initially was set on.
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    (Original post by Unvincibledudeman)
    Howdy. I'm currently doing AS maths, physics, chemistry, geology and German, and am targeted for (at the moment at least) As, which is in theory entirely feasible, but it's too early to be sure.
    Basically, I want to enter a line of work that allows me to travel quite a lot, allows me to earn quite a lot and makes use of science and maths. I wouldn't mind working with the British Antarctic Survey, or other similar organisations. I'm just a little unsure as to what degree course to take though.

    Currently physics is my big love, but physics degrees look a little broad (so postgrad specialisation looks essential -correct me if I'm wrong) and the earning power of a physicist looks good, but a little less impressive when compared to more specialised degrees. I have also read that physics graduates go on to do all sorts of things, especially financial work, and although I'm sure the earning potential there is huge, it just sounds plain boring.
    On the other hand, geophysics is more focused and earning power seems to have a larger range, but does it mean sacrificing "pure" physics and just focusing on earth science? And is it as transferable as physics, or does a geophysics graduate only have the option of engineering/construction work or exploration work? Are there many jobs for geophysicists out there? (in the UK or abroad).

    The reason I ask it that my AS Geology has just turned into fact memorisation. There's little in the way of fundamental theory supported by maths, as you would get in physics, and this has made me a bit iffy about doing an earth science degree, which is what I initially was set on.
    Happened to see your post. I did a degree in physics and now work in the oil industry with many geoscience and geophysics people. Don't get mislead by statistics, a degree in physics may on average earn less (I don't know the figures) but a person with a degree in physics doing the same job as someone who did geophysics would get paid the same. Just because you can go into financial work doing a physics degree it doesn't mean you have to and most courses will offer a choice of modules. If you really like physics, then the step to geophysics is really not a big one. If it were me, I would consider a BSc in physics followed by a masters in geophysics. The alternative is to go from the geology/earth sciences route, but it sounds to me that you are more biased towards the physics side than the geology option. Most geophysicists I know came either from physics or from geology/earth sciences (roughly 50:50).

    Oh and career options - geological survey/government work and oil (oh and time team ) would be the main ones I think.
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    (Original post by F1 fanatic)
    Happened to see your post. I did a degree in physics and now work in the oil industry with many geoscience and geophysics people. Don't get mislead by statistics, a degree in physics may on average earn less (I don't know the figures) but a person with a degree in physics doing the same job as someone who did geophysics would get paid the same. Just because you can go into financial work doing a physics degree it doesn't mean you have to and most courses will offer a choice of modules. If you really like physics, then the step to geophysics is really not a big one. If it were me, I would consider a BSc in physics followed by a masters in geophysics. The alternative is to go from the geology/earth sciences route, but it sounds to me that you are more biased towards the physics side than the geology option. Most geophysicists I know came either from physics or from geology/earth sciences (roughly 50:50).

    Oh and career options - geological survey/government work and oil (oh and time team ) would be the main ones I think.
    Thanks man! I thought I was never going to get an answer!
    I'm only being put off a physics BSc by the fact that my maths, although good, isn't brilliant and also the price that comes attached to a postgrad masters. It is something I'll look into though, cheers!
    Going straight into geophysics looks a tad easier. You can get into a course with Unis like ICL with As and Bs and do an undergraduate masters. The physics BSc route does sound more fun though. Thanks for your help!
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    (Original post by Unvincibledudeman)
    Thanks man! I thought I was never going to get an answer!
    I'm only being put off a physics BSc by the fact that my maths, although good, isn't brilliant and also the price that comes attached to a postgrad masters. It is something I'll look into though, cheers!
    Going straight into geophysics looks a tad easier. You can get into a course with Unis like ICL with As and Bs and do an undergraduate masters. The physics BSc route does sound more fun though. Thanks for your help!
    Postgrad masters is not necessarily expensive, depending on whether you can get funding. It is a lot easier in the sciences. Maths can be an issue, but it depends where you study. Further Maths is a help if you study it, if not it's not critical and they will teach you it. However, most of physics is maths to be honest with you.
 
 
 
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