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    Hi! I'm also retaking my exam tomorrow! For Section A...what kind of point would you make...something like, say, Auden mocks Miss Gee...and then you would find a quote to back up that point...and then explain all the techniques within that quote? The problem I'm having is just talking about technique, I ramble on and talk about meaning and go far too deep!
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    (Original post by Laura1237)
    Can you take your texts into the exam with you? Because we have been told we can't. Is this for AQA English AS specification A? Please let me know because if you can that is so unfair!! :confused:
    No, you can't take your annotated texts with you, whichever spec you're on, they give you a clean copy in the exam, so it's a good idea to have memorised your thoughts on each chapter.

    (Original post by Jess1907)
    Hi! I'm also retaking my exam tomorrow! For Section A...what kind of point would you make...something like, say, Auden mocks Miss Gee...and then you would find a quote to back up that point...and then explain all the techniques within that quote? The problem I'm having is just talking about technique, I ramble on and talk about meaning and go far too deep!
    Section A will ask you to comment on a particular aspect of narrative in the first question, so make sure you focus on that aspect alone and don't waste time talking about characterisation when they want setting, for example. Really, it should be your initial point that says the technique or presentation used, then backed up with an example from the text, and then, crucially, explain the effect of this in the context of the narrative as a whole. You don't need to go into great detail about meanings, just remember that AQA want you to explore methods of narrative and their effectiveness.
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    I'd rub out your texts and take them into school. We just have to bring our own blank texts - school won't provide any They don't even buy them for us the first time! Let alone a clean copy for the exams so I'd take them just in case
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    yeah, i'm screwed- got a low c in this paper last year, cw bumped it up to 150. still haven't read the texts though, nor did i make any notes last year
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    Quite interesting info if it helps:

    Section A questions are in two parts:

    a) Usually follow this format:"How does x(author's name) tell the story in Y(chapter of novel/selected poem; may be a selected section in the case of long chapters/poems?"

    The only AO(assessment objective) for this section is A02, which means that you should pcus on how form, structure and language shape meaning and how how they combine to help the narrative progress. YOU DON'T need to worry about A01 (written expression), so don't spend time writing an introduction and conclusion; try instead to make a point in your first sentence! This is also not the point at which to explore interpretations (A03) or contect (A04)-no matter how valid your points, they will not gain marks!

    *Remember that this is an open book exam, which means that you are expected to relate ALL your points to to quotations from the text. You can't get more than about a D grade without quoting and commenting in detail on the quotations.*

    b) This part of the question usually puts forward some sort of opinion about the text and asks whether (or to what extent) you agree. For example, "X(title of text) is essentially about Y(theme). How far do you agree with this view?"

    As you can see, this question asks you to construct an argument which explains and justifies your opinion. This means that, in this case, you DO need to develop a structured piece of writing which moves naturally from a bried introduction (in which you can state your opinion), through a series of detailed analyses, to a conclusion in which you explain how the points you have made support your opinion.

    This part is assessed by A01 (written expression, structured argument), A03 (interpretation of the text) and A04 (reference to context where relevant)

    Section B questions deal with quite broad aspects of narrative: they have to, beause they have to be applied to all the texts available to students. They will ask you to discuss some aspect of narrative technique with reference to three texts. E.g. Author's use of time (i.e.how they order events), titles, how they narrate key openings/endings...
    Other posibilities include characterisation (i.e. not character, but how a character is created) settings, (geographical/historical etc), creation of tension/ suspense/ sympathy/ empathy etc.

    In each case, remember to focus on narrative technique. Do not get distracted and start writing your opinions about a character, what you think the key themes are, your evaluation of the context etc...

    The question says "Write about X (narrative technique) in three texts you have studied" Note that is doesn't say compare and contrast. So you don't have to do so; it will be OK for you to write three 'mini-essays', one on each texts. Some comparisons will come naturally, but don't feel that you have to try and analyse connections that aren't really there! All four AOs are tested in this section.
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    (Original post by Jose1989)
    Quite interesting info if it helps:

    Section A questions are in two parts:

    a) Usually follow this format:"How does x(author's name) tell the story in Y(chapter of novel/selected poem; may be a selected section in the case of long chapters/poems?"

    The only AO(assessment objective) for this section is A02, which means that you should pcus on how form, structure and language shape meaning and how how they combine to help the narrative progress. YOU DON'T need to worry about A01 (written expression), so don't spend time writing an introduction and conclusion; try instead to make a point in your first sentence! This is also not the point at which to explore interpretations (A03) or contect (A04)-no matter how valid your points, they will not gain marks!

    *Remember that this is an open book exam, which means that you are expected to relate ALL your points to to quotations from the text. You can't get more than about a D grade without quoting and commenting in detail on the quotations.*

    b) This part of the question usually puts forward some sort of opinion about the text and asks whether (or to what extent) you agree. For example, "X(title of text) is essentially about Y(theme). How far do you agree with this view?"

    As you can see, this question asks you to construct an argument which








    explains and justifies your opinion. This means that, in this case, you DO need to develop a structured piece of writing which moves naturally from a bried introduction (in which you can state your opinion), through a series of detailed analyses, to a conclusion in which you explain how the points you have made support your opinion.

    This part is assessed by A01 (written expression, structured argument), A03 (interpretation of the text) and A04 (reference to context where relevant)
    Section B questions deal with quite broad aspects of narrative: they have to, beause they have to be applied to all the texts available to students. They will ask you to discuss some aspect of narrative technique with reference to three texts. E.g. Author's use of time (i.e.how they order events), titles, how they narrate key openings/endings...
    Other posibilities include characterisation (i.e. not character, but how a character is created) settings, (geographical/historical etc), creation of tension/ suspense/ sympathy/ empathy etc.

    In each case, remember to focus on narrative technique. Do not get distracted and start writing your opinions about a character, what you think the key themes are, your evaluation of the context etc...The question says "Write about X (narrative technique) in three texts you have studied" Note that is doesn't say compare and contrast. So you don't have to do so; it will be OK for you to write three 'mini-essays', one on each texts. Some comparisons will come naturally, but don't feel that you have to try and analyse connections that aren't really there! All four AOs are tested in this section.
    just a point section b is ao1 2 and 3 no reference to context is required! Good post though
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    (Original post by trollman)
    just a point section b is ao1 2 and 3 no reference to context is required! Good post though
    I thought that as well! I was a bit worried when I read it because it seemed a bit much to write a whole essay with one AO. thanks
 
 
 
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