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Can an LLM boost my chances of geting into top firm ? watch

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    SO, in 2010 I am starting my undergraduate degree.I have only gotten offers from QMUL so far, but still wait for Nottingham and Durham ones.
    I know it is too early to think about LLM but I am really interested in this.I am very good at math and I`d like one day to practise in the area of finances.Do you think getting into a ''Law and finances'' LLM program at Oxbridge + LSE/UCL can boost my chances of one day getting into big firm ?I still havent decided whether I want to be a solicitor or barrister.
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    SO, in 2010 I am starting my undergraduate degree.I have only gotten offer from QMUL so far, but still wait for Nottingham and Durham ones.
    I know it is too early to think about LLM but I am really interested in this.I am very good at math and I`d like one day to practise in the area of finances.Do you think getting into a ''Law and finances'' LLM program at Oxbridge + LSE/UCL can boost my chances of one day getting into big firm ?I still havent decided whether I want to be a solicitor or barrister.
    Improving your English will help a lot more, providing you want to work in the UK...
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    (Original post by Nyet)
    Improving your English will help a lot more, providing you want to work in the UK...
    Don`t worry about this.In order to get offers from Edinburgh/Birmingham, and QMUL, my language must be good enough, don`t you think ?I just noticed you have Warning Level 5, which is not surprising considering your ignorance.
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    No, as long as you are willing to pay universities will accept you with "academic" but not nescessary language skill.

    The above poster did reply to you quite rudely, but he is correct that your posts are clearly not from a native English speaker. To become a barrister, and probably a solicitor, your English will need to be indescernable from that of a native speaker. I am sure you can address this while living here/ at uni.

    In addition to your gramatical errors, you seem to use a few americanisms - "gotten" is not a word in uk english and it is Maths not Math for example.
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    Don`t worry about this.In order to get offers from Edinburgh/Birmingham, and QMUL, my language must be good enough, don`t you think ?I just noticed you have Warning Level 5, which is not surprising considering your ignorance.

    Excuse me, not all users possessing a 'warning level 5' badge are ignorant, i'll have you know.

    I have also applied for law.
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    Don`t worry about this.In order to get offers from Edinburgh/Birmingham, and QMUL, my language must be good enough, don`t you think ?I just noticed you have Warning Level 5, which is not surprising considering your ignorance.
    Not really, seeing as universities judge you on your academic skill, rather than language skill. The only way you demonstrate your linguistic ability is through your personal statement, which isn't particularly hard to produce to a high standard, especially considering how long one has to write it.
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    I have covered the English entry requirements of almost every university - I got 103 on TOEFL out of 120.I have to admit, though, that I write in a more American style as I participate in many US forums and watch American movies almost every day.Of course, when I come to UK and start learning there, my language skills will be infallible.
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    I know it is too early to think about LLM but I am really interested in this.I am very good at math and I`d like one day to practise in the area of finances.Do you think getting into a ''Law and finances'' LLM program at Oxbridge + LSE/UCL can boost my chances of one day getting into big firm ?I still havent decided whether I want to be a solicitor or barrister.
    Firstly, you talk of improving your chances of getting into a big firm. To clarify, solicitors work in firms, and barristers work in chambers.
    Barristers are much more heavily involved in the academic side of law, so an LLM may be an advantage here.
    However, a solicitor must know the necessary law in order to advise clients from the outset, but other skills are also considered just as important, such as application of the law, teamworking, commercial awareness etc. As long as you have a 2:1 in your degree, the LLM will only be worth what you want it to be in terms of your personal academic goals, otherwise, it will not be anything overly special and should not be relied upon as the only thing you wish to help make you stand out in applications and interviews.
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    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    Firstly, you talk of improving your chances of getting into a big firm. To clarify, solicitors work in firms, and barristers work in chambers.
    Barristers are much more heavily involved in the academic side of law, so an LLM may be an advantage here.
    However, a solicitor must know the necessary law in order to advise clients from the outset, but other skills are also considered just as important, such as application of the law, teamworking, commercial awareness etc. As long as you have a 2:1 in your degree, the LLM will only be worth what you want it to be in terms of your personal academic goals, otherwise, it will not be anything overly special and should not be relied upon as the only thing you wish to help make you stand out in applications and interviews.
    Thank you, this is exactly the answer I needed.So, if I decide to be a barrister, an LLM will be helpful ?
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    Thank you, this is exactly the answer I needed.So, if I decide to be a barrister, an LLM will be helpful ?
    I can only say that I'd imagine, moreso than if you chose to become a solicitor, then yes.
    To be honest, I would base your judgement on deciding whether to read for an LLM on your enjoyment of academia alone, and not on employability.
    You may find that you are not so keen on the pure academics of law, compared to working with it, and they are very different things. If you like keeping your head in books (as well as the essential enjoyment and skill of advocacy) then you will be suited to becoming a barrister. An LLM will be more relevant here.
    But as I said, its still probably not worth it for your career's sake at such an early stage; read for your degree, undertake the LPC/BPTC and see how your successful your applications are throughout then. If you're finding that the LLM may prove advantageous, only then consider it for emploment's sake.
    At such an early stage (and that includes upon graduation) you will have no idea where you'd like to specialise in practice, which can make it hard to embark upon specialised academic reading knowing it will directly prove useful in practice compared to showing a pure personal academic interest in that area.
    Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    Thank you, this is exactly the answer I needed.So, if I decide to be a barrister, an LLM will be helpful ?
    There are a number of posts on this which it will be worth searching. Confirmed by Simon Myerson who is a practicing QC, LLM is little help at the bar unless is it very specific in a specific set eg IP or it is the BCL from Oxford.

    To realistically become a barrister you must have a good degree - ideally a first, in all but a few cases from a very strong uni, box ticking ecs such as mooting and mini pupillages, work experience such as FRU CAB or paid legal experince, and other experience either in life (mature candidate) or uni society to show you have the required competencies. Your english (written and spoken) must be gramatically pretty perfect (in british english) to get you to interview, and then you need to have the general oomph to do well enough in a pupillage interview to stand out amoung the other 20-80 people competing for each place.

    A years legal experience such as Amicus, CAB, Paralegaling is worth far far more points worth than an LLM

    Look at the profiles of recent tennents at barristers chambers - not many have post grads - all have a variety of life/work experiences.
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    Thank you, all of you
    One last question.As I said, I have offers from QMUL,Edinburgh, and Birmingham.I am waiting for Nottingham and Durham ones.However, if I somehow don`t receive offers from these extremely competitive institutions, will a QM degree ,even a first, hinders my chances of becoming a barrister, considering that there are many applicants from more prestigious universities ?
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    Thank you, all of you
    One last question.As I said, I have offers from QMUL,Edinburgh, and Birmingham.I am waiting for Nottingham and Durham ones.However, if I somehow don`t receive offers from these extremely competitive institutions, will a QM degree ,even a first, hinders my chances of becoming a barrister, considering that there are many applicants from more prestigious universities ?
    No.
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    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    Thank you, all of you
    One last question.As I said, I have offers from QMUL,Edinburgh, and Birmingham.I am waiting for Nottingham and Durham ones.However, if I somehow don`t receive offers from these extremely competitive institutions, will a QM degree ,even a first, hinders my chances of becoming a barrister, considering that there are many applicants from more prestigious universities ?
    My goodness, you had the answer to this on your how much does it cost thread!! Because you didnt like the answer thats not going to change becuase a few undergrads who havent been through the process make uneducated guesses, which can be the only aim asking the question again.
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    (Original post by FMQ)
    My goodness, you had the answer to this on your how much does it cost thread!! Because you didnt like the answer thats not going to change becuase a few undergrads who havent been through the process make uneducated guesses, which can be the only aim asking the question again.
    I am sorry mate, but I want to hear as many opinions as possible.Thats the purpose of such boards, and thats why we all gather here - to discuss important stuff.
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    As above, probably not. LLMs are particularly useful in some fields, and I gather that International Finance is one such field - but generally they don't add all that much.

    Finance law doesn't really involve any maths - that all gets left to the accountants. Lawyers deal with things more along the lines of disclosure requirements, effectively taking security over assets, complying with regulations, ensuring that appropriate warranties and indemnities are in place etc. etc.

    Personally I'd wait until you've done a little more law before worrying about the LLM. You never know, you might be surprised and find that you enjoy an area of law you didn't previously consider
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    (Original post by 4WhenImBanned)
    Not really, seeing as universities judge you on your academic skill, rather than language skill. The only way you demonstrate your linguistic ability is through your personal statement, which isn't particularly hard to produce to a high standard, especially considering how long one has to write it.
    Wot you chattin? Most good universities have English language requirements for foreign applicants and they have to get a certain grade as part their conditional offer as well. :eyeball:
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    (Original post by Joy Division)
    Wot you chattin? Most good universities have English language requirements for foreign applicants and they have to get a certain grade as part their conditional offer as well. :eyeball:
    Hence I said academic skill.

    An A in English Literature does not necessarily mean that you are skilled in the language.
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    I'm planning to do LLM in Vienna but I just want to do this for my own selfish satisfaction :mmm: Imo it's not really a crucial factor and definitely it won't dramatically boost your chances of getting into magic circle, unfortunately :sigh:
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    (Original post by 4WhenImBanned)
    Hence I said academic skill.

    An A in English Literature does not necessarily mean that you are skilled in the language.
    Have you heard of TOEFL and IELTS ?
 
 
 
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