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AS Sensing Coursework: calibrating a thermistor watch

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    Can somebody please give me some help/ideas on how to set this up, what the circuit will look like, what range to take readings from, etc? Have had virtually no support in class and am panicking about doing this tomorrow.

    Will rep!

    Thankyou
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    Is this for Advancing Physics? I did quite a similar thing for my coursework if so.
    I did it using a potential divider, containing a thermistor and a fixed resistor, and then got some readings by getting some water and heating it up basically and shoving the thermistor in, and seeing how the voltage produced varied.
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    (Original post by Revolution is my Name)
    Is this for Advancing Physics? I did quite a similar thing for my coursework if so.
    I did it using a potential divider, containing a thermistor and a fixed resistor, and then got some readings by getting some water and heating it up basically and shoving the thermistor in, and seeing how the voltage produced varied.
    Yes it is advancing physics.

    Did you use a voltmeter to measure p.d. across the resistor, or thermistor? Or were you measuring resistance from the thermistor?

    I'm really confused.
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    (Original post by mydearthing)
    Yes it is advancing physics.

    Did you use a voltmeter to measure p.d. across the resistor, or thermistor? Or were you measuring resistance from the thermistor?

    I'm really confused.
    You could do either; either of them could be "R1" in the Potential Divider. And then, by knowing the output voltage across either of those, and the resistance of the fixed resistor and the input voltage, you could then calculate the resistance of the thermistor.
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    (Original post by Revolution is my Name)
    You could do either; either of them could be "R1" in the Potential Divider. And then, by knowing the output voltage across either of those, and the resistance of the fixed resistor and the input voltage, you could then calculate the resistance of the thermistor.
    Thank you. Have looked into it and it makes a lot more sense. Have repped.
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    I've been given this same task to do, eventually settled (as most seem to have done) on calibrating a thermistor and putting that into the context of using it to control... something, simple enough

    Trouble is I'm not too sure what to actually do with my results now, for the first part can't remember how to work out resistance over the thermistor only, within the potential divider, (in the book somewhere I'm sure, can't find it though, any ideas?), and after that not really sure what to do with my data, some graphs, but what to say about them, rather confused, anyone got any tips?

    (Yay first post)
 
 
 

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