Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I have decided (based on doing work experience and looking at degree structures) that I want to do a Chem Eng degree. And by this I mean not 'General Eng and then specialising', just Chem Eng on it's own. Oxbridge do not offer a full straight Chem Eng course, so they are out of the question. After doing some research I saw Imperial was the one with the next highest requirements by FAR. It wants A*AA and therefore has the highest straight Chem Eng requirements. However, after Imperial, the next highest offers for Chem Eng are all AAB (Newcastle Manchester Birmingham etc). How come there is such a gap between one uni at the top (Imperial) and all the others, especially when Chem Eng has such well paid graduates. I thought this would lead to higher entry requirements? I am just wondering why they are AAB and not say AAA? Thanks.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Its quite easy, grade requirements are made based on applications. So supply and demand. Theres a shortage of people interested in engineering in general, which is why its highly paid and why there is frequently low entry requirements across the range of specialisations.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chap54)
    Its quite easy, grade requirements are made based on applications. So supply and demand. Theres a shortage of people interested in engineering in general, which is why its highly paid and why there is frequently low entry requirements across the range of specialisations.
    Thanks for the reply.

    Ah so it's nothing to do with it being a course which is becoming less 'prestigious', it's simply that they're trying to attract more applicants?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mfc20)
    I have decided (based on doing work experience and looking at degree structures) that I want to do a Chem Eng degree. And by this I mean not 'General Eng and then specialising', just Chem Eng on it's own. Oxbridge do not offer a full straight Chem Eng course, so they are out of the question. After doing some research I saw Imperial was the one with the next highest requirements by FAR. It wants A*AA and therefore has the highest straight Chem Eng requirements. However, after Imperial, the next highest offers for Chem Eng are all AAB (Newcastle Manchester Birmingham etc). How come there is such a gap between one uni at the top (Imperial) and all the others, especially when Chem Eng has such well paid graduates. I thought this would lead to higher entry requirements? I am just wondering why they are AAB and not say AAA? Thanks.
    Thats the same for medicine, I reckon if someone cocks up on one A level they leave a bit of leeway.
    Edit: In fact the requirements are nearly exactly the same, AAB or A*AA in oxbridge sometimes
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gingergooner)
    Thats the same for medicine, I reckon if someone cocks up on one A level they leave a bit of leeway.
    Edit: In fact the requirements are nearly exactly the same, AAB or A*AA in oxbridge sometimes
    Ok cheers. It's just I'm aiming for perhaps A*AA, at least AAA, and only one university asks for any of these. And so if I didn't like Imperial, I would be going somewhere with much lower entry requirements than what I'm capable of getting, and so just wanted to check the courses themselves were as good as they sound despite the lower entry requirements!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mfc20)
    Ok cheers. It's just I'm aiming for perhaps A*AA, at least AAA, and only one university asks for any of these. And so if I didn't like Imperial, I would be going somewhere with much lower entry requirements than what I'm capable of getting, and so just wanted to check the courses themselves were as good as they sound despite the lower entry requirements!
    Lol just be happy you have some leeway, it means if you have a bad day during an exam, and suddenly halfway through your mind goes blank or you panic you know its not the end of the world.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mfc20)
    Thanks for the reply.

    Ah so it's nothing to do with it being a course which is becoming less 'prestigious', it's simply that they're trying to attract more applicants?
    Precisely, its a good degree to do. Its certaintly well thought of by employers I would imagine. The reason you have one place asking for the much higher requirements is most likely that because of its brand name it is able to ask for such grades. Otherwise it might lower its overall positioning in league tables and alike with average entry tariff being a measure used in most. The rest will ask lower grades to encourage people to study it.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chap54)
    Its quite easy, grade requirements are made based on applications. So supply and demand. Theres a shortage of people interested in engineering in general, which is why its highly paid and why there is frequently low entry requirements across the range of specialisations.
    This.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Civil Engineering ftw.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Nah. Come on guys, be honest. It's cos anyone can be a Chemical Engineer. All you do is blow your house up, create booze or drugs and you're a chemical engineer.

    Posted with a lot of tongue in cheek.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Not really a competative course, so with less demand the requirements are lower.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hmm chemical engineering is a prestigious course and it has applications in almost every field. But a lot of people might not want to do it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My opinion as to why there is a difference in grades is that there used to not be an A* grade and so the difference between the top offer AAA and second offer AAB was only one grade. When the A* was introduced the top universities decided to put their offers up making them A*AA for example whereas the other universities kept the offers as they used to be. There really isn't a huge difference in offer and you won't find large differences in the course just because the grade offer is slightly lower.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mfc20)
    I have decided (based on doing work experience and looking at degree structures) that I want to do a Chem Eng degree. And by this I mean not 'General Eng and then specialising', just Chem Eng on it's own. Oxbridge do not offer a full straight Chem Eng course, so they are out of the question.
    You've had the answer to why the requirements are different, so let's address why you've knocked general courses on the head in such a cavalier fashion. Just because a university does not offer a straight course in a given discipline does not mean that you'd be less knowledgeable, worse off in any way, or somehow less well qualified when you graduate. Oxford's course, for instance, despite being billed as a general course, allows you to specialise in chemical engineering and qualify with suitable accreditation after specialising for the last two years; the first years are spent studying topics that you would probably be studying on the specialist courses elsewhere, anyway, and are either common to all branches of engineering or useful secondary knowledge for all disciplines. An advantage of a general course is that you have two years in which to change your mind about the discipline you are interested in.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Good bloke)
    You've had the answer to why the requirements are different, so let's address why you've knocked general courses on the head in such a cavalier fashion. Just because a university does not offer a straight course in a given discipline does not mean that you'd be less knowledgeable, worse off in any way, or somehow less well qualified when you graduate. Oxford's course, for instance, despite being billed as a general course, allows you to specialise in chemical engineering and qualify with suitable accreditation after specialising for the last two years; the first years are spent studying topics that you would probably be studying on the specialist courses elsewhere, anyway, and are either common to all branches of engineering or useful secondary knowledge for all disciplines. An advantage of a general course is that you have two years in which to change your mind about the discipline you are interested in.
    I understand what you are saying, but I am certain I do not want to do the general courses as I have looked at their structures as well. For instance I do not want to have to study parts of electronic engineering, I know after doing lots of work experience, I want to do Chem, and not just specialise after 2 years.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: January 18, 2010
The home of Results and Clearing

1,295

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  2. University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  3. Bishop Grosseteste University
    All Courses Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
Poll
Will you be tempted to trade up and get out of your firm offer on results day?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.