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    So I was watching some science stuff and it was talking about spheres. It got me thinking about is it possible to get an absolute perfect sphere? A sphere that is dimensionally perfect that it could withstand an infinite amount of pressure, like a black hole. An absolute perfect sphere would have no 'weak points' where pressure can be exerted onto and break the sphere... Maybe in the future we will be able to travel through black holes in an absolute spherical spacecraft?
    Can anyone explain this further?
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    No. Spheres are a mathematical invention. (Like circles, squares and pretty much anything else you can think of).

    We can model real life things as mathematical objects, but they are not the same thing.

    We're thinking about this in too simplistic a way; spheres are good at withstanding pressure at some scale. When we get down to atomic levels we don't have anything close to a sphere, and forces as we think of them on a "sphere wide" level don't work.
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    Would I be right in saying that even if you made a perfect sphere, at the atomic level it still wouldn't be perfect? Or is that not relevant here?
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    (Original post by jakash)
    Would I be right in saying that even if you made a perfect sphere, at the atomic level it still wouldn't be perfect? Or is that not relevant here?
    It wouldn't be perfect though, would it? Here's a picture of the space buckminsterfullerne occupies ( http://www.3dchem.com/imagesofmolecules/c60a.jpg ) - even though the atoms are arranged "spherically", the actual atoms are spheres themselves, so the surface of the ball isn't perfect, it's all bumpy. Plus it has holes in the middle of each hexagon. This kind of effect would be present no matter how big the ball was (in this case its made of 60 carbon atoms, but you can build them much bigger).
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    Not in real life no.
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    BTW science fact:

    If the earth was shrunk down to the size of a snooker ball

    It'd be the most spherical ball ever.

    That's how bad we are at making spheres.
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    http://www.poetv.com/video.php?vid=41243
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    (Original post by Adonis)
    BTW science fact:

    If the earth was shrunk down to the size of a snooker ball

    It'd be the most spherical ball ever.

    That's how bad we are at making spheres.
    I lol'd.

    What about if you didn't make the sphere from particles?
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    What else do you suppose we make it out of?

    Dark Matter?
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    Some sort of ray?
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    (Original post by Zungie)
    I lol'd.

    What about if you didn't make the sphere from particles?
    How would you make something that wasn't from atoms?...

    Point is is that chemical bonds are straight, 1000 arranged in a circle might look like a perfect circle from a certain distance but closer to it'd look polyhedral.
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    (Original post by Zungie)
    Some sort of ray?
    Light is massless sweetie x

    and is a particle-wave

    read more science.
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    This is related to defining the kilogram, and they're getting more and more perfect all the time.

    I think the closest was made out of silicone in australia..
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    If you don't want your sphere to be an object in the normal sense, you could regard the field around a particle as a sphere; seems to me that'd be a darn sight closer than anything you could get made of matter, at least.

    I have a feeling that quantum physics probably prohibits that from functioning as a sphere, though.
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    (Original post by Adonis)
    Light is massless sweetie x

    and is a particle-wave

    read more science.
    I prefer not to be patronised.

    And the question was whether it was possible to create a perfect sphere, nothing about it being a physical mass.
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    (Original post by Zungie)
    I prefer not to be patronised.

    And the question was whether it was possible to create a perfect sphere, nothing about it being a physical mass.
    I don't know how you would create it, stumped there
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    Oh, and with regards to traveling through black holes, wouldn't a near-perfect sphere be apt enough anyway?

    Just how would you propell such a thing without making it NOT a sphere? And you'd have to build whatever your sending through inside the sphere as to make it completely sealed.
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    (Original post by Zungie)
    Oh, and with regards to traveling through black holes, wouldn't a near-perfect sphere be apt enough anyway?
    We'll also have to decide what we mean by "through" a black hole. Unless we think it's some kind of wormhole, we'd not be able to get out the other 'side'
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    (Original post by Zungie)
    Oh, and with regards to traveling through black holes, wouldn't a near-perfect sphere be apt enough anyway?

    Just how would you propell such a thing without making it NOT a sphere? And you'd have to build whatever your sending through inside the sphere as to make it completely sealed.
    To an observer if someone did manage to get "into" a black hole it would (to the observer) take an infinte amount of time for that individual to reach the event horizon and so if you did "get through" (whatever we mean by this) then it would be quite unexpected what you would find so far as we have no idea how the Universe will change after such a time has passed.

    (Original post by Adonis)
    Light is massless sweetie x

    and is a particle-wave

    read more science.

    If you are going to patronise someone at least use facts, light is not massless. And it sin't literally a particle-wave.
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    If the most fundamental particle was plastercine-like, it'd be possible, unfortunately that probably isn't the case.
 
 
 
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