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    (Original post by paella)
    Most lawyers want to be lawyers, not academics. I'm interested in money, people and things. All of this educational rubbish I've been doing for most of my life and will continue to do for another 4 years or so is only the means to those ends. As is, ultimately, any job I get in the future.
    You do realise that learning does not stop once you become a lawyer, right? You'll have a hell of a lot of work still to be doing, worse deadlines than those of university assignments, including working some weekends even at smaller firms, and you're constantly having to research bits of law because its always changing and being used in your caseload or advice.
    You're leaving in a dream world.
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    (Original post by paella)
    Hey TSR, what's the easiest degree to do at a top 20 uni (by easiest I mean the least amount of work to get a 2:1). I'm not going to university for love of the subject, and I'm not academic at all. Sadly one has to go to university to get a good job (so many people go employers think you're stupid otherwise). I'm probably going to go into management or finance or law, so something like civil engineering would be pretty useless. The only strict sciences I'd consider doing are Maths and Physics. I can't do a language. Otherwise I can do pretty much anything. I'm lazy as hell, so a large volume (relatively) of work isn't going to get me anywhere. I'm pretty clever, I don't mind a 'hard' subject, but I don't want a heavy subject that'll interfere with everything else I plan to be doing at uni.

    Also preferably not a course that will have many of the following on: animal rights activists, labour supporters, vegans, metrosexual homosexuals and feminists (if of course these people gravitate to a particular type of course).

    Thanks
    P.
    What a ****.
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    (Original post by Jemmmy)
    Someone who doesn't want to put the time or effort in and wants an 'easy' degree is more likely to find it at a less prestigious uni.
    they dont want an easy rubbish degree, they want the most efficient way to get a good degree
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    (Original post by imhiya)
    History, everyone says for the first two years you don't have to read a book.
    Utter BS
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    film studies...

    or

    women studies
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    computer science at imperial very little work and none of those people.
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    I would recommend doing Philosophy or PPE. Philosophy is quite a good course for people who are not interested in anything in particular, as it is fairly general and has a good variety in it. If you want to get a good job after, PPE probably has the slight edge, as it includes stuff that is more useful in the real world. Either is not going to have that much work, typically these subjects will have between half and a third of the number of hours in lectures or seminars and tutorials as a science will, and don't require as much hard work.
    Alternatively, you could look at a combined arts, or classics course. These have a low number of hours a week too, and it should be relatively easy to get a place on them at a good uni, like Durham, or York, or St Andrews, which won't give you as much work as Oxford or Cambridge would, but are still quite strong for these subjects. LSE might also be worth considering for PPE, but they might work you harder, as there are more foreign students there (which tend to take things more seriously).
    I've allready got my degree, and am doing a PhD now at Cambridge, so I do know how much work is involved at undergrad level, and it is possible to get a 2.1 while spending a good proportion of your time partying. I did a science, and that required more work than I was comfortable doing, but my first year arts modules were a laugh, one lecture a week and optional essays, I also did better in them than the modules related to my degree course, with less effort, which was great, so I would recommend looking for something like that.
    Going to uni for three years is a good idea, even if you're not interested in your subject (though I happen to be interested in mine). It is better than getting a job (I never want to have to get one), you can have loads of fun, get drunk, make friends, doss around, and all under the guise of doing something useful with your life.
    If you're intelligent, then you are wasting yourself by not going to uni, even if you are going for the "wrong" reasons.
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    It depends what you're best at. I do politics, and would be rubbish at a science subject. A lot of people are the other way round.

    No matter how or how little work you have to do, it will always feel like a chore if you don't enjoy it.
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    (Original post by Becky21)
    I think it was a joke
    some people on tsr don't get jokes - they are to obsessed by the academic world to make time for humour - ******* geeks. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Jemmmy)
    Someone who doesn't want to put the time or effort in and wants an 'easy' degree is more likely to find it at a less prestigious uni.
    I'm doing the bare academic minimum I can to get a good job. If a top 20 university wasn't largely essential, I wouldn't mention it.

    (Original post by llys)
    So I would suggest you do Joint Honours in
    Mathematics and Economics/Finance/Business
    Mathematics and a language (ab initio; I would suggest: Italian=very easy), or Drama or Music (would increase workload though)
    Mathematics and Computing (if you have some programming skills that should be fine)
    Mathematics and Philosophy/Sociology/Psychology/Law (this will increase workload a bit due to essays)
    Thanks, exactly the sort of thing I was looking for. I might take a gap year and do further maths to aid my application, or I could take further maths up next year if I decide I want to do something mathy.
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    (Original post by paella)
    Being prepared to put in the minimum amount of effort into getting a 2:1 means exactly that. I'll do enough work to get a 2:1. I want to find the thing that takes the least work, but once I've found it, I have no problem doing that minimal amount.
    You expect a job in the city or a training contract with a law firm with a low 2:1?
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    Am I the only one smelling :troll:
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    (Original post by paella)
    Productive like what. I wouldn't get a job that wouldn't stimulate me, or without the prospect of quick promotion or high pay. In terms of money I'd take from the taxpayer and money I would in future put back in, university is the most productive option.
    Clearly you think the world owes you an easy life. You want everything handed to you on a silver plate. God, I hate people with that attitude :mad: Grow up.


    (Original post by paella)
    Very few universities interview, and I'm competent enough in english to write an interested personal statement.
    Unfortuntately, that's true enough. If you do get in I pity the poor candidate who actually deserves the place you fill (and probably drop out of).

    (Original post by paella)
    Most lawyers want to be lawyers, not academics. I'm interested in money, people and things. All of this educational rubbish I've been doing for most of my life and will continue to do for another 4 years or so is only the means to those ends. As is, ultimately, any job I get in the future.
    I wonder how much you actually know about being a lawyer. Seeing as you seem to be adverse to hard work of any sort, I think you'll be bitterly disappointed when you enter the real world and realise you can't just cruise through. Unless you have some sort of personality transplant on entering the workplace I doubt you'll be considered for a "quick promotion." I sincerely hope not, anyway.
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    (Original post by EM(Lin))
    Unfortuntately, that's true enough. If you do get in I pity the poor candidate who actually deserves the place you fill (and probably drop out of).
    Why should any candidate who cant get a place above someone who doesn't care tat much feel aggrieved? Clearly they were rubbish.
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    I wouldn't worry about it just yet Paella. There will be plenty of time to think about it when you get to big school.
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    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    You do realise that learning does not stop once you become a lawyer, right? You'll have a hell of a lot of work still to be doing, worse deadlines than those of university assignments, including working some weekends even at smaller firms, and you're constantly having to research bits of law because its always changing and being used in your caseload or advice.
    You're leaving in a dream world.]You do realise that learning does not stop once you become a lawyer, right? You'll have a hell of a lot of work still to be doing, worse deadlines than those of university assignments, including working some weekends even at smaller firms, and you're constantly having to research bits of law because its always changing and being used in your caseload or advice.
    You're leaving in a dream world.
    I have no problem with working hard as a lawyer. The social stigma, getting large amounts of money, having something practical and competitive that I can sink my teeth into, meeting other lawyers, meeting interesting people to represent - that's why the hard work in a job (or really any job I do (but different things to look forward to)) is going to be worth it to me. I had an interesting chat with one of the lawyers that represented Heather Mills and he told me how hard it was, he also managed to communicate the sense of winning and the competition and the thrill that I want in a job; and that academia won't give.

    That's why I don't like academia, there's not the same sort of competition, or powerplay, or clear set goal. If I got a 1st in Mathematics from Cambridge - I haven't beaten anyone. If I solve some mathematic formula, well there's another one just around the corner. I could write literature forever and never hit a bestseller. The lawyer I was talking to bought himself a mansion with a ballroom and a massive swimming pool with the bonus he got. That's competing for something. That's winning.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Why should any candidate who cant get a place above someone who doesn't care tat much feel aggrieved? Clearly they were rubbish.
    Not necessarily for a top 20 university, where they have to reject many top-quality applicants. If the OP really does manage to write an incredible personal statement they may squeeze out a more deserving candidate.
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    (Original post by EM(Lin))
    Not necessarily for a top 20 university, where they have to reject many top-quality applicants. If the OP really does manage to write an incredible personal statement they may squeeze out a more deserving candidate.
    And they will squeeze less out of the ones who don't strive for a 2.1.
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    (Original post by Xenopus)
    classics course. These have a low number of hours a week too
    It's a lie! I work virtually every day of the week, well more than students on other courses, and that's just to keep on top of it. Languages need regular work, especially ones like Latin and Greek.
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    (Original post by EM(Lin))
    Clearly you think the world owes you an easy life. You want everything handed to you on a silver plate. God, I hate people with that attitude Grow up.
    Not at all. But unless you are an entrepreneur or especially talented at something (e.g. a professional footballer) most jobs will require a degree for certain roles. I'm forcing myself to university so I can get the oppertunity to work hard and get what I want - Why don't I just get a job, well I just don't see the merit in climbing the ladder when the rungs disappear for me halfway up.

    I don't worry about impression when I'm on the net lol, it's the internet! If we met outside a job interview, I'd just be a nice guy who makes you feel good about yourself and leaves you with a smile on your face
 
 
 
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