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Easiest degree to do (@ a top 20 uni) watch

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    (Original post by paella)
    Also preferably not a course that will have many of the following on: animal rights activists, labour supporters, vegans, metrosexual homosexuals and feminists (if of course these people gravitate to a particular type of course).
    lol what a loser
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    (Original post by paella)
    Hey TSR, what's the easiest degree to do at a top 20 uni (by easiest I mean the least amount of work to get a 2:1). I'm not going to university for love of the subject, and I'm not academic at all. Sadly one has to go to university to get a good job (so many people go employers think you're stupid otherwise). I'm probably going to go into management or finance or law, so something like civil engineering would be pretty useless. The only strict sciences I'd consider doing are Maths and Physics. I can't do a language. Otherwise I can do pretty much anything. I'm lazy as hell, so a large volume (relatively) of work isn't going to get me anywhere. I'm pretty clever, I don't mind a 'hard' subject, but I don't want a heavy subject that'll interfere with everything else I plan to be doing at uni.

    Also preferably not a course that will have many of the following on: animal rights activists, labour supporters, vegans, metrosexual homosexuals and feminists (if of course these people gravitate to a particular type of course).

    Thanks
    P.
    Well, you sound delightful. ha.
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    Perhaps you could get in touch with a few friends that may study at a good university and get their opinions. If you're quite clever then I would imagine that you wouldn't have to sacrifice your social life for the sake of scraping a 2:1, though if I were you I'd certainly try and leave some room for human error pal. Perhaps a few people who study at university could give examples of their typical week in terms of hours of study.

    I don't think there is too much wrong with your attitude (though as I tend to be of the perfectionist ilk, I'm quite the opposite). You're only trying to enhance your career prospects and I'd think that most of us are in the same boat. Life is full of good "blaggers" so you all will have to get used to it, even if it may seem (and probably is) unfair.
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    I've done a bit of research, and I like the look of taking a broad social science, like PPE/IR/Government.
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    (Original post by paella)
    I've done a bit of research, and I like the look of taking a broad social science, like PPE/IR/Government.
    ...PPE is probably regarded as one of the hardest/most intensive courses you could do at a top Uni.
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    u sound like a ******* retard to be honest with u, I wouldn't want u coming to my university if u discredit people like that. get/buy an online degree and avoid procreating.
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    I don't like you, but i respect your honesty.

    To be honest not everybody has a set path which they feel passionate about, not everybody has a pre-determined route, some just want to get a degree and be financially secure at the end of it.

    All the haters need to realise that this person is academically gifted and is prepared to knuckle down in any subject they think they will succeed in at the end of their education. There is no good everybody telling him that it's passion which gets you through a degree, because we have all done 10 years prior to university in subjects a lot of us may not have enjoyed.

    Yes a degree might be more intensive, but some do not need to love the subject to be good at it, despite common ideologies...

    I would recommend doing something science based, anything humanities based is going to have a lot more essay writing, whereas with more science based subjects if you are naturally gifted at it (ie Maths) then the workload is reduced significantly.
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    OP, are you a troll? If not you really shouldn't be going to university if you have no interest in the subject. You may get through the first year but after that you'll probably end up dropping out, and you'll have a load of debt and nothing to show for it! (I'm sure the parties'll be good though...)
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    (Original post by Jacinta)
    If not you really shouldn't be going to university if you have no interest in the subject. You may get through the first year but after that you'll probably end up dropping out, and you'll have a load of debt and nothing to show for it! (I'm sure the parties'll be good though...)
    Any evidence for that?

    They have an interest in a 2.1, that should get them through.

    Personally, I liked my subject for the first year and a bit year, didn't do very well, started hating it, but needed the 2.1 motivated me to up my game and I did far better in the last two years than in the first two.
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    It's perfectly valid to go uni to get a 2.1. degree and a professional job afterwards. It's not the nicest thing for lecturers, that's all.

    If you read TSR, you will notice that quite a lot of people start to lose the "passion" for their subject half-way through their degree anyway - and they are often told to "stick it out because you're already halfway through" "it's just one more year, just think of the job you will be able to get afterwards" and (for disillusioned low-contact-hour graduates) "you only need a good degree, and the subject doesn't matter anyway"...
    ...
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Any evidence for that?

    They have an interest in a 2.1, that should get them through.

    Personally, I liked my subject for the first year and a bit year, didn't do very well, started hating it, but needed the 2.1 motivated me to up my game and I did far better in the last two years than in the first two.
    A friend of mine went to go and study History and Politics at Southampton because it was a prestigious uni etc etc and dropped out after the first term because it bored her so much. Luckily she got out early and is now reapplying to do a course she acually has an interest in but say if you managed to stick out the first year by saying 'all I need is a 2:1 and I'm set' and when the work cranks up in the second year and by halfway through you're at your wits end, its pretty much 2 years and a lot of money wasted!
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    (Original post by Jacinta)
    A friend of mine went to go and study History and Politics at Southampton because it was a prestigious uni etc etc and dropped out after the first term because it bored her so much. Luckily she got out early and is now reapplying to do a course she acually has an interest in but say if you managed to stick out the first year by saying 'all I need is a 2:1 and I'm set' and when the work cranks up in the second year and by halfway through you're at your wits end, its pretty much 2 years and a lot of money wasted!
    So your evidence base is one person quiting after a term?
    I'm guessing we've got global cooling going on because its been colder than usual this winter?

    Be interesting to see if they drop out again or not.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    So your evidence base is one person quiting after a term?
    I'm guessing we've got global cooling going on because its been colder than usual this winter?

    Be interesting to see if they drop out again or not.
    Well obviously I wasn't going to write a whole essay on every reason why I think choosing a degree which you have no interest in from the start is a bad idea on a message board!
    To be honest my friend was in the same position as the OP, she wanted a good degree for job prospects but didn't know what and needed a bit more time than others to really figure it out, just a suggestion but maybe the OP needs a year out or something before committing him/herself to a 3 year course?
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    (Original post by Xenopus)
    I would recommend doing Philosophy or PPE. Philosophy is quite a good course for people who are not interested in anything in particular, as it is fairly general and has a good variety in it. If you want to get a good job after, PPE probably has the slight edge, as it includes stuff that is more useful in the real world. Either is not going to have that much work, typically these subjects will have between half and a third of the number of hours in lectures or seminars and tutorials as a science will, and don't require as much hard work.
    Alternatively, you could look at a combined arts, or classics course. These have a low number of hours a week too, and it should be relatively easy to get a place on them at a good uni, like Durham, or York, or St Andrews, which won't give you as much work as Oxford or Cambridge would, but are still quite strong for these subjects. LSE might also be worth considering for PPE, but they might work you harder, as there are more foreign students there (which tend to take things more seriously).
    I've allready got my degree, and am doing a PhD now at Cambridge, so I do know how much work is involved at undergrad level, and it is possible to get a 2.1 while spending a good proportion of your time partying. I did a science, and that required more work than I was comfortable doing, but my first year arts modules were a laugh, one lecture a week and optional essays, I also did better in them than the modules related to my degree course, with less effort, which was great, so I would recommend looking for something like that.
    Going to uni for three years is a good idea, even if you're not interested in your subject (though I happen to be interested in mine). It is better than getting a job (I never want to have to get one), you can have loads of fun, get drunk, make friends, doss around, and all under the guise of doing something useful with your life.
    If you're intelligent, then you are wasting yourself by not going to uni, even if you are going for the "wrong" reasons.
    Xenopus, I don't know what uni you went to, but Philosophy at Cambridge at least is NOT a doss subject by any means... it does require hard work, and if you don't believe me I challenge anyone to comfortably digest on the first reading any serious philosophy text. PPE is probably a bit lighter reading-wise, English is quite light, but Land Economy is the least amount of work overall, I would say. Granted, science has more contact hours, but we philosophers spend a load of time reading.
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    (Original post by cheeseandchocolate)
    Xenopus, I don't know what uni you went to, but Philosophy at Cambridge at least is NOT a doss subject by any means... it does require hard work, and if you don't believe me I challenge anyone to comfortably digest on the first reading any serious philosophy text. PPE is probably a bit lighter reading-wise, English is quite light, but Land Economy is the least amount of work overall, I would say. Granted, science has more contact hours, but we philosophers spend a load of time reading.
    I'm at Cambridge now, doing a PhD. OK, philosophy isn't the subject that I read, but I have done one module of it at undergraduate, in my first year. I didn't do any of the essays for it all term, had one hour of lectures a week for the module (compared to four, and practicals for my other modules), and one hour tutorial per fortnight. I got a load of books out of the library two days before the exam, crammed, and got a better mark in the exam than in any of my science modules, which I had spent a lot more time revising. You might have to do a lot of work for it, but I think that once you grasp the concepts, which might not take long, then there is not very much work involved. Obviously, there are easier subjects, but if you are intelligent, then the work to gain ratio for philosophy is as good as anything, given that it is a degree worth having more than the one you mentioned, even though it may require slightly more work. Obviously, the longer it takes you to understand what you read, the harder work it will be, but I read philosophy for leisure, to chill out from the work I actually have to do, and do not find it overly taxing.
 
 
 
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