Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Do you have US Citizenship? If not, you may want to forget the idea of being able to work in the U.S. - at least research it very very thoroughly before assuming that its a viable option
    If you actually graduate in a US school, I don`t think Visa should be a problem to work there.I have a friend who graduated from Dartmouth and works for Microsoft ...
    Even so, I can always marry a us girl
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    If you actually graduate in a US school, I don`t think Visa should be a problem to work there.I have a friend who graduated from Dartmouth and works for Microsoft ...
    Even so, I can always marry a us girl
    Visas can be an enormous problem even if you graduate from a US law school. My understanding (don't take it as gospel) is that you will have to find a firm that's willing to sponsor you(you can't apply yourself), willing to pay $5,000 to get you through the visa application process, willing to wait 6months or longer for it to get sorted and I believe the firm has to show that there aren't Americans ready and willing to do the job, which it probably isn't going to be able to. It isn't a particularly realistic proposition for someone fresh out of law school. I'm sure you do have a friend for Microsoft - you might want to ask him how he got his visa. It is definitely not straightforward. Getting a green card through the intra-firm transfer route (e.g. if he worked for them in the UK and Microsoft wanted to move him over) is considerably easier; and the family route is easier still. I'm not saying you can't get a visa and I'm not an expert, I'm saying its a really really serious problem that you need to do some serious research into before you even think about applying to US law schools. The EU has made intra-EU travel and work so easy that people tend to forget how much of a problem visas can be with the US.

    If you can marry a US girl, go for it
    Offline

    3
    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Visas can be an enormous problem even if you graduate from a US law school. My understanding (don't take it as gospel) is that you will have to find a firm that's willing to sponsor you(you can't apply yourself), willing to pay $5,000 to get you through the visa application process, willing to wait 6months or longer for it to get sorted and I believe the firm has to show that there aren't Americans ready and willing to do the job, which it probably isn't going to be able to. It isn't a particularly realistic proposition for someone fresh out of law school. I'm sure you do have a friend for Microsoft - you might want to ask him how he got his visa. It is definitely not straightforward. Getting a green card through the intra-firm transfer route (e.g. if he worked for them in the UK and Microsoft wanted to move him over) is considerably easier; and the family route is easier still. I'm not saying you can't get a visa and I'm not an expert, I'm saying its a really really serious problem that you need to do some serious research into before you even think about applying to US law schools. The EU has made intra-EU travel and work so easy that people tend to forget how much of a problem visas can be with the US.

    If you can marry a US girl, go for it
    Employers only need to prioritise American applicants if they've already got a significant minority (~10-20%) of H1-B employees. I honestly can't say for certain that this is the case, but I very much doubt that'd apply to many U.S. law firms because of the relative complexity of going and getting a JD in another country when most people who want to be lawyers wouldn't care that much about where exactly.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You didnt actually answer my other question.Do you think going to Business school instead of Law school is better ?I am currently reviewing all my options and ,although, I am applying to UK law schools now, I need to have back-up plans if I don`t get into one that I like.
    My other option is to go to the American University of Bulgaria ( I was offered 100% tuition scholarship due to my high SAT score), then working 2-3 years in a local firm and go to the USA for a MBA program.I am so happy to have parents that can afford it...So, do you guys think this is the better option than going to a Law school after my undergraduate program in Bulgaria ?I will say it again, this is only a back-up plan I don`t want anything more than being offered a place at one of my dream UK law schools - Nottingham or Durham
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    You didnt actually answer my other question.Do you think going to Business school instead of Law school is better ?I am currently reviewing all my options and ,although, I am applying to UK law schools now, I need to have back-up plans if I don`t get into one that I like.
    My other option is to go to the American University of Bulgaria ( I was offered 100% tuition scholarship due to my high SAT score), then working 2-3 years in a local firm and go to the USA for a MBA program.I am so happy to have parents that can afford it...So, do you guys think this is the better option than going to a Law school after my undergraduate program in Bulgaria ?I will say it again, this is only a back-up plan I don`t want anything more than being offered a place at one of my dream UK law schools - Nottingham or Durham
    I don't think its really for me to judge to be honest. Law and business are two different, though related, career options and its for you to decide which you want to take. It sounds like a fine back-up plan to me. Many congratulations on the scolarship you got offered and your SAT score by the way
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    I don't think its really for me to judge to be honest. Law and business are two different, though related, career options and its for you to decide which you want to take. It sounds like a fine back-up plan to me. Many congratulations on the scolarship you got offered and your SAT score by the way
    Thank you, I was informed by Nottingham and Durham that it will definitely be considered when making decisions regarding my application.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ivan Stanchev)
    I should make myself familiar with the LSAT.If I dont make it to UK law school, I may go for my undergaduate degree in a local university and then to go to Law School in the USA
    You don't need to even think about the LSAT until about nine months before you start your final year of uni, assuming you want to go straight into law school after you finish your degree. (This assumes taking it in the summer before your last year, and commencing studying six months before the test. You really don't even need that long to prepare.) Chill. Spend the time making the marks so you *do* get into a good UK law school, not trying to plan your next fifteen years of life.

    If you want to get into a decent American law school, you'd be better off taking your degree in an English-speaking country with more respected/renowned universities.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey folks, I'm from the US, and I could tell you guys a bit about how things work, even though I'm not going to study law over there.

    So, yes, law, in the form of a J.D., is a postgraduate course. To become a lawyer, you have to do approximately seven years of studying. Medicine is more like ten.

    In high school, university-bound students take the SAT I, which is a standard verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning and analytical writing test. This test is taken in 11th grade, or when the student is 16. The SAT II is a subject test, which is not equivalent to an A-level; rather, it is used for placement in college courses. The rough equivalent of an A-level is an AP (Advanced Placement). They give you university credit. So I took six AP tests and received 24 credits (16 is a typical semester at my school). AP tests are actually entirely independent of the classes you take -- they are run by the College Board, a non-profit organization -- and do not figure into the grade you get in the class. For example, I took AP US History. New York State requires its own test, the Regents Exam, and that score was figured into my overall grade for the year. But I also took the AP test, and received a 4 on it, earning me four credits in college.

    Students start university when they are 18 (not 19) in the US. This is a common misconception, but in fact, most schools in the US are public state schools, of varying degrees of quality. A number of private schools, like Harvard, Yale, and Stanford, get a lot of attention, but a number of others, such as Berkeley and UCLA, are state schools. In-state tuition runs about $10,000 a year, and out-of-state tuition is double that. Private schools are about $35,000 or even more.

    The person above mentioned that most students receive scholarships, and this is true. I went to a private school and received a scholarship worth about $18,000 a year. My tuition was a bit more than what it would have been if I had gone to a state school in New York (I basically got a full ride in the honors college to an okay SUNY school, but turned it down).

    Basically, the way university finance works in the US is quite similar to how health care works in France or Germany (which is why the US has the best university system in the world, and why France has the best health care system in the world): there are numerous sources of money. Let's make a list: parents' savings, parents' earnings, students' earnings, federally subsidized student loans, federally subsidized work-study, federal Pell Grants (for students from low-income backgrounds), university scholarships, state scholarships, federal scholarships, private and charitable scholarships, the occasional high school or local scholarship, federal university funding, state university funding, and so on. Universities in the US have independent endowments, which are managed funds of money relying primarily on tax-deductible alumni donations. These endowments give the universities a lot more autonomy compared to European universities. It also gives them the opportunity to offer scholarships to students they would have come and study.

    Moreover, this funding allows US universities to pursue research. Simply put, there is a lot more money for research at US universities, and that money is not dependent on the political winds. Professors in the US earn about twice as much as professors in Europe do, and have money to attend conferences and so on. US universities also support graduate students. Students pursuing a PhD typically have an assistantship (either research or teaching), which requires 20 hours of work per week and gives them a stipend of about $16,000 a year (more for natural science students), plus extra money to attend conferences.

    All of this makes for a very dynamic university system in terms of research. But it is also actually a more egalitarian system compared to Europe. Fully 37% of Americans age 25-40 have a bachelor's degree (42% in Canada), compared to 22% in the UK, 20% in Germany, 12% in Italy, and so on. This is because they charge tuition, not in spite of it. They can offer qualified needy students scholarships. Of course this is all skewed towards middle-class students, but it is everywhere.

    Still and all, I want to do law in the UK because Europe is more interesting (for me) than the US and because I don't want to live in the suburbs. The fact that most American cities are crime-ridden dumps is a big turn-off.

    Law school. The price tag is truly exorbitant, but again, there are scholarships available, and actually there is a system involved. A student without a scholarship typically takes out $50K or $70K for first year law school (this is much lower for in-state state schools). After the first year is up, a student will go on to do a "summer associateship", which pays $20,000 or even $30,000, subsidizing much of the student's tuition for the next year. After 2L, the student will again do a summer associateship. It is typically with that firm that the student will receive his first job. Many students and professors consider 3L to be a waste of time, but it is in this year that students often specialize in the kind of law they wish to practice.

    But so imagine if you will, a student with a good LSAT score and a good GPA who gets a full scholarship to a university below what he could have been accepted to, and then does summer associateships for the next two years. This student could conceivably come out of law school ahead in terms of money.

    Finally, there's the bar exam, which is a state-by-state thing. The student typically studies for this on his own in 3L and in his first year of working. You guys should know (and probably do know) that you are allowed to sit for the New York and California bar exams with an LLB. Be aware, however, that these exams test American law, and really state law, not jurisprudence.

    Okay, so there you have it. I hope that this has been informative for you guys and hopefully not inflammatory and all of that. Ask me questions if you want.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Zweifel)
    Hey folks, I'm from the US, and I could tell you guys a bit about how things work, even though I'm not going to study law over there.

    So, yes, law, in the form of a J.D., is a postgraduate course. To become a lawyer, you have to do approximately seven years of studying. Medicine is more like ten.

    In high school, university-bound students take the SAT I, which is a standard verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning and analytical writing test. This test is taken in 11th grade, or when the student is 16. The SAT II is a subject test, which is not equivalent to an A-level; rather, it is used for placement in college courses. The rough equivalent of an A-level is an AP (Advanced Placement). They give you university credit. So I took six AP tests and received 24 credits (16 is a typical semester at my school). AP tests are actually entirely independent of the classes you take -- they are run by the College Board, a non-profit organization -- and do not figure into the grade you get in the class. For example, I took AP US History. New York State requires its own test, the Regents Exam, and that score was figured into my overall grade for the year. But I also took the AP test, and received a 4 on it, earning me four credits in college.

    Students start university when they are 18 (not 19) in the US. This is a common misconception, but in fact, most schools in the US are public state schools, of varying degrees of quality. A number of private schools, like Harvard, Yale, and Stanford, get a lot of attention, but a number of others, such as Berkeley and UCLA, are state schools. In-state tuition runs about $10,000 a year, and out-of-state tuition is double that. Private schools are about $35,000 or even more.

    The person above mentioned that most students receive scholarships, and this is true. I went to a private school and received a scholarship worth about $18,000 a year. My tuition was a bit more than what it would have been if I had gone to a state school in New York (I basically got a full ride in the honors college to an okay SUNY school, but turned it down).

    Basically, the way university finance works in the US is quite similar to how health care works in France or Germany (which is why the US has the best university system in the world, and why France has the best health care system in the world): there are numerous sources of money. Let's make a list: parents' savings, parents' earnings, students' earnings, federally subsidized student loans, federally subsidized work-study, federal Pell Grants (for students from low-income backgrounds), university scholarships, state scholarships, federal scholarships, private and charitable scholarships, the occasional high school or local scholarship, federal university funding, state university funding, and so on. Universities in the US have independent endowments, which are managed funds of money relying primarily on tax-deductible alumni donations. These endowments give the universities a lot more autonomy compared to European universities. It also gives them the opportunity to offer scholarships to students they would have come and study.

    Moreover, this funding allows US universities to pursue research. Simply put, there is a lot more money for research at US universities, and that money is not dependent on the political winds. Professors in the US earn about twice as much as professors in Europe do, and have money to attend conferences and so on. US universities also support graduate students. Students pursuing a PhD typically have an assistantship (either research or teaching), which requires 20 hours of work per week and gives them a stipend of about $16,000 a year (more for natural science students), plus extra money to attend conferences.

    All of this makes for a very dynamic university system in terms of research. But it is also actually a more egalitarian system compared to Europe. Fully 37% of Americans age 25-40 have a bachelor's degree (42% in Canada), compared to 22% in the UK, 20% in Germany, 12% in Italy, and so on. This is because they charge tuition, not in spite of it. They can offer qualified needy students scholarships. Of course this is all skewed towards middle-class students, but it is everywhere.

    Still and all, I want to do law in the UK because Europe is more interesting (for me) than the US and because I don't want to live in the suburbs. The fact that most American cities are crime-ridden dumps is a big turn-off.

    Law school. The price tag is truly exorbitant, but again, there are scholarships available, and actually there is a system involved. A student without a scholarship typically takes out $50K or $70K for first year law school (this is much lower for in-state state schools). After the first year is up, a student will go on to do a "summer associateship", which pays $20,000 or even $30,000, subsidizing much of the student's tuition for the next year. After 2L, the student will again do a summer associateship. It is typically with that firm that the student will receive his first job. Many students and professors consider 3L to be a waste of time, but it is in this year that students often specialize in the kind of law they wish to practice.

    But so imagine if you will, a student with a good LSAT score and a good GPA who gets a full scholarship to a university below what he could have been accepted to, and then does summer associateships for the next two years. This student could conceivably come out of law school ahead in terms of money.

    Finally, there's the bar exam, which is a state-by-state thing. The student typically studies for this on his own in 3L and in his first year of working. You guys should know (and probably do know) that you are allowed to sit for the New York and California bar exams with an LLB. Be aware, however, that these exams test American law, and really state law, not jurisprudence.

    Okay, so there you have it. I hope that this has been informative for you guys and hopefully not inflammatory and all of that. Ask me questions if you want.
    Very informative post, appreciate your time.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: February 14, 2010

University open days

  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Days - Exeter Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
  • University of Bradford
    Faculty of Health Studies Postgraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
  • Northumbria University
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.