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    I freaking love the medicine forum.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    Grad. entry medicine is competitive, but in all honesty, most places won't give any advantage to a 1st providing you've got a 2;1.
    But some do - e.g. Birmingham for one, who openly state that they have never yet had to consider anyone with a 2.1. It would definitely be better that you get as high as you can.

    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    getting good enough work experiance was the biggest problem
    I would agree - even though you will get lots of experience in the NHS and would be able to reflect on that, it would be quite difficult to actually get across to interviewers why you want to change based on your work experience and not sound like you're completely putting down nursing. They would most likely ask you a lot of things about why you weren't interested in just pursuing nurse practitioner roles or some other specialist training.

    You may be better off doing something like biomedical science, since this would give you a great grounding for GEP and may also open up some more medical schools to you (I may be wrong on this, but I am sure that I have read on at least one site that nursing isn't always counted as enough of a 'science' degree for some GEP courses which only look at science grads).
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    (Original post by foxyamy)
    But some do - e.g. Birmingham for one, who openly state that they have never yet had to consider anyone with a 2.1. It would definitely be better that you get as high as you can.
    Hence my use of the word: most.
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    i'd consider nussing meself hehe, but then i'm patient orientated kinda student doctor, not a textbook wannabe.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    1. The course isn't straight forward..it's very confusing at times, and you're an independant learner, and with all the academic and theoretical work, plus the practical side and proficencies needing to be done, it's not straight foward

    2. It's ******* hard to get a 1st, your degree mark depends on placement performance aswell as getting 80%+ in theory in 2nd and 3rd year, it's as tough as any degree in a university.

    3. I'm a 2nd year student, my hours have almost doubled this year yet i still manage to do a part-time job
    what i said above is what people on this site have told me. i am not lying or telling the truth i am just repeating what i have been told. people on this site told me not to do nursing if i want to do GEP medcine because of those reasons.

    i made a thread about 2weeks ago asking about what the work was like on a nursing degree and loads of replies came back as 'its piss', 'you never have to revise', 'all exams are multi chioce so there really easy'.

    what i said was not gospel. like i said in the post 'what i have heard from other people' ..... sorry i upset you
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    (Original post by BJCMDTGB)
    Thank you everyone for your help

    to ballerinabetty ... Would there be a better way to get into medicine considering the grades I have at the moment?
    1.resit your alevels; but only a few unis take this and they expect AAA.

    2.do a founation year; bradford clinical science

    3.if you do a science based degree you have the option of applying to so many more medschools.

    to be honest though if you really wanna do nursing for now and have good reasons to go into medcine (coz the med school will want good solid reasons) and your willing to revise for the GAMSAT then you stand the same chance as anyone else.
    and really no matter what grades or degrees you have you could still be rejected from medicine.
    if this is what you wanna do go for it but be awear that you will have to start the grad entry work/prep stright away.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    It's possible, but people who want a nursing place work their arse off- it's not a course like biomed, or biology, it's a vocational degree, which leads to a professional registration and a career. I'd seriously question your place on this course, and consider offering it to someone who would really want, not necessarily the place on the course- but the career that comes with it
    im sorry but this sounds a little selfish. i dont think you sould be making her feel guilty about her place because she likes nursing and medicine. she won that place fair and square why should she give it to someone else.
    also people work their arse off on all degrees and are usually looking for a career.
    even if OP does not want to be a nurse she is still allowed to do a nursing degree.
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    1.resit your alevels; but only a few unis take this and they expect AAA.
    So'ton and BSMS don't.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    Hence my use of the word: most.
    Sorry - late at night, obviously didn't read that properly!!!
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    You won't catch me saying this about the tools who take medicine and want to become investment bankers, because they genuinely are stealing someone elses place.
    Me too, christ I hate that bunch of *****.


    Back onto the OP though, I see no reason not to go for it, though I think one would have to be either insane or very determined to put up with three years of nursing simply to have a shot at medicine.
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    lol, aye, you never 'ear of disgruntled biomeds raising an objection to the failed medics who nick their biomed places, macca hehehe.
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    If I had to take a course, there are far more interesting things than nursing. You'll do all the science again, properly and the degree is orientated to a different model of work.
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    although as a qualified nurse you can earn loads whilst a med student, and you wont need to go far to get it (any ospital where you study will provide employment).

    the same could be said for pharmacy etc.

    if i was 18 again, i wouldnt dive into a vocational subject so early on, i'd do 'istory or summat interesting like that hehe. Its the last chance tomould your mind when you are that age, and you dont want to build it round the stuffy old sciences.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    If I had to take a course, there are far more interesting things than nursing. You'll do all the science again, properly and the degree is orientated to a different model of work.

    I have to agree with this, about 45% of my course is all preparation for being a qualified nurse, with clinical skills and also the whole professional issues, history of nursing, I had to sit through a rather tiring lecture today on manual handling in the community, and as long and boring as it was (apart from the bit when my lectuere through another lecturer on some pillows) i knew it'd be used when i qualify. If i didn't plan to have these skills or knowledge when i finish the degree, i'd have lost interest a long time ago
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    No I didn't, credit to Sarky for finding it. Cross posted from current medics.
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    Hello all, I'm Liam, new onto the forum here. I'm working in nursing myself and looking to apply for graduate entry medicine. I reckon maybe a bit of thinking outside the box is required for nurses wanting to study medicine, so can I jot down my thoughts?

    I completed a BA and then began working in acute settings as a Nursing Assistant, started my Nursing BSc a year later, and after a big change of circumstances said 'carpe diem', quit, and went back to being a Nursing Assistant in order to save money for the Graduate Medicine courses.

    I reckon this has been my strength, not weakness - I've studied loads of stuff at higher education level and got good grades, and have years of acute experience. I didn't want to finish the Nursing BSc as I felt it was a waste of time and money when I could be getting full time experience and full time wages.

    What I'd say to the original poster is, again, think outside the box. Keep your career goals in mind while you're on the ward in your nursing placements. The doctors on my wards know I want to be a doctor, so I sit in on consultant's meetings, assist with procedures, work shadow when I have the time, get called in to do emergency care and challenging stuff, go on ward rounds, and get to pick the brains of every medic I meet. And I'm getting paid for this.

    At the same time, I'm revising for the aptitude tests, joining St John Ambulance, researching the Foundation Programme and whatnot, reading the Student BMJ, and so on.

    I don't think you have to drop everything and go and do Biomed. Of course I haven't got a place yet so we'll have to see, but be flexible!
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    (Original post by ljos)
    Hello all, I'm Liam, new onto the forum here. I'm working in nursing myself and looking to apply for graduate entry medicine. I reckon maybe a bit of thinking outside the box is required for nurses wanting to study medicine, so can I jot down my thoughts?

    I completed a BA and then began working in acute settings as a Nursing Assistant, started my Nursing BSc a year later, and after a big change of circumstances said 'carpe diem', quit, and went back to being a Nursing Assistant in order to save money for the Graduate Medicine courses.

    I reckon this has been my strength, not weakness - I've studied loads of stuff at higher education level and got good grades, and have years of acute experience. I didn't want to finish the Nursing BSc as I felt it was a waste of time and money when I could be getting full time experience and full time wages.

    What I'd say to the original poster is, again, think outside the box. Keep your career goals in mind while you're on the ward in your nursing placements. The doctors on my wards know I want to be a doctor, so I sit in on consultant's meetings, assist with procedures, work shadow when I have the time, get called in to do emergency care and challenging stuff, go on ward rounds, and get to pick the brains of every medic I meet. And I'm getting paid for this.

    At the same time, I'm revising for the aptitude tests, joining St John Ambulance, researching the Foundation Programme and whatnot, reading the Student BMJ, and so on.

    I don't think you have to drop everything and go and do Biomed. Of course I haven't got a place yet so we'll have to see, but be flexible!
    Good for you mate! Seems like you are doing all the right things...
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Good for you mate! Seems like you are doing all the right things...
    I wrote that pretty quickly before flying off somewhere (literally) so it was more 'look at me' than I meant it to be! I was merely trying to make the point that I've been trying to use my situation to my advantage, even if it is an untraditional point of entry to medical school that is similar to the original poster's, and create my own opportunities.

    A few more thoughts on this subject, to respond to the OP and other posters' comments:

    Firstly, I didn't discontinue the Nursing BSc because I thought it was a waste of time in itself, but because with a BA it would surplus to academic requirements for GEP medicine. I don't think the OP is 'wasting' a valuable Nursing course place by being on it and wanting to do medicine - (s)he will be learning transferable skills and working for the NHS as a supernumerary staff member. The NHS damn well got their bursary's worth out of me on the wards!

    BJCMDTGB, have you considered six year courses into medicine, or a foundation degree, or is this too expensive?

    To reply to the interview question, 'Why not become a Nurse Practitioner?' I would say: because I believe that nurses should nurse. IMHO experienced Nurses should become Nurse Specialists in areas like tissue viability, chronic illness management and palliative care - because they'll be better at that than any doctor. They should not be replacing the SHO in A&E minors because it's cheaper for the Trust, because they don't have the same diagnostic knowledge and ability. If a nurse wants that role, they should go to medical school.

    (By the way, the Nurse Consultant in Vascular Surgery I met as a student gave me useful teaching sessions and was setting up aneurysm screening clinics on her tod, so I find the NC-bashing a bit naughty, guys - they've got their place! )
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    (Original post by ljos)
    I wrote that pretty quickly before flying off somewhere (literally) so it was more 'look at me' than I meant it to be! I was merely trying to make the point that I've been trying to use my situation to my advantage, even if it is an untraditional point of entry to medical school that is similar to the original poster's, and create my own opportunities.

    A few more thoughts on this subject, to respond to the OP and other posters' comments:

    Firstly, I didn't discontinue the Nursing BSc because I thought it was a waste of time in itself, but because with a BA it would surplus to academic requirements for GEP medicine. I don't think the OP is 'wasting' a valuable Nursing course place by being on it and wanting to do medicine - (s)he will be learning transferable skills and working for the NHS as a supernumerary staff member. The NHS damn well got their bursary's worth out of me on the wards!

    BJCMDTGB, have you considered six year courses into medicine, or a foundation degree, or is this too expensive?

    To reply to the interview question, 'Why not become a Nurse Practitioner?' I would say: because I believe that nurses should nurse. IMHO experienced Nurses should become Nurse Specialists in areas like tissue viability, chronic illness management and palliative care - because they'll be better at that than any doctor. They should not be replacing the SHO in A&E minors because it's cheaper for the Trust, because they don't have the same diagnostic knowledge and ability. If a nurse wants that role, they should go to medical school.

    (By the way, the Nurse Consultant in Vascular Surgery I met as a student gave me useful teaching sessions and was setting up aneurysm screening clinics on her tod, so I find the NC-bashing a bit naughty, guys - they've got their place! )
    firstly, good helpful post.
    secondly, what do you mean by a 6year course? like a foundation med course? coz i thoought they were for people with the wrong alevels?
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    firstly, good helpful post.
    secondly, what do you mean by a 6year course? like a foundation med course? coz i thoought they were for people with the wrong alevels?
    There are 2 versions of foundation courses. One of them is for people who have the grades but the wrong subjects (e.g. Bristol) and the other is for those who have the right subjects but due to circumstances out of their control (e.g. socioeconomic factors) are unable to achieve the grades required for a 5 year course (e.g. Soton BM6 and UEA 6yr)
 
 
 
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