Valuable Second Language Watch

lexinuk
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Victor-PP)
You'll never become fluent enough in neither Mandarin nor Russian
I am sorry to disappoint you but I once met a school student who spoke almost perfect Russian. The guy was English himself, studied the language at A-level and spent a year in Russia. Therefore, it can be done and I, a native speaker of Russian was really impressed. I mean, really and advised him considering working for secret service .
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chalks
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#42
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#42
(Original post by mickeyfit)
It is not my intention to learn the language for a training contract application - I'm thinking much further down the line - I would like to start now, so that in years to come, it will make more roles available to me - I have seen a lot of legal roles advertised lately that are looking for people with German/Arabic/Russian/Mandarin. I already study part time, and work full time -showing that I am able to balance legal studies with work is already covered !!! it would be naive of me to think I'd be able to get to any level of competency in any second language for it to be worth mentioning in TC applications. (Though looking at some applications they do ask levels of compentency in foreign languages).

Having a second language interests me because I want to be flexible in where I can work - I want as many doors to be open to me upon qualification as possible and I think a second language would help me with this.
I understand. However, be clear on what doors you think it will realistically open up for you and whether those options are really attractive. It is not enough to say (as others have) "China's going to be really big in the future" - you need to think about how that will impact on an English qualified/London resident corporate lawyer doing, most likely, corporate/banking type work in the City.

Secondly, ask yourself honestly whether you think you would have the capacity (time-wise and intellectually) to learn the language of your choice to the necessary level. It is one thing learning a language now, as a student. It is quite another when you are working full-time especially in the corp/comm world when the hours can be lengthy.

I certainly don't mean to dismiss your idea out of hand. However, it seems to be that the potential benefits are far outweighed by the disadvantages and risks.
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mickeyfit
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#43
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#43
(Original post by chalks)
I understand. However, be clear on what doors you think it will realistically open up for you and whether those options are really attractive. It is not enough to say (as others have) "China's going to be really big in the future" - you need to think about how that will impact on an English qualified/London resident corporate lawyer doing, most likely, corporate/banking type work in the City.

Secondly, ask yourself honestly whether you think you would have the capacity (time-wise and intellectually) to learn the language of your choice to the necessary level. It is one thing learning a language now, as a student. It is quite another when you are working full-time especially in the corp/comm world when the hours can be lengthy.

I certainly don't mean to dismiss your idea out of hand. However, it seems to be that the potential benefits are far outweighed by the disadvantages and risks.
As I said, I am already working full time, and studying part time - I plan on mostly working on the language between May and October this year (when I don't have uni in the evenings as I do now), and then in my spare time over the coming years - as I said I don't at all think it will be easy, or quick - Its a long term plan....
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Edycal
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#44
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#44
I speak both English and Portuguese fluently. As an additional bonus for learning Portuguese we understand Spanish, whereas they can't understand us. Brazil is as well on it's way to becoming a world superpower and since it's the 5th most spoken language in the world i would recommend it =).
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chalks
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#45
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#45
(Original post by mickeyfit)
As I said, I am already working full time, and studying part time - I plan on mostly working on the language between May and October this year (when I don't have uni in the evenings as I do now), and then in my spare time over the coming years - as I said I don't at all think it will be easy, or quick - Its a long term plan....
If you have your heart set on learning a language then go for it: I just don't think you will necessarily be able to get to the standard needed which will open the doors you anticipate.

If you are looking to develop other skills so as to make yourself a more valuable proposition to law firms now and in the future, then you might consider doing some courses/training which are more directly relevant to commercial law. Any sort of introduction to finance type courses will be invaluable once you start work - you'd be amazed how many of us lawyers are utterly incapable of reading company accounts...

Another alternative would be some form of project management training. The vast majority of corporates use these methodologies (Prince2, SixSigma etc) and, speaking from experience, it is always impressive to find that your external counsel know what these involve and are happy to use them. It could well be something which would really set you apart as a candidate and demonstrate good commercial awareness as you can show that you understand not just what big business does but how.
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Over_The_Odds
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#46
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#46
(Original post by Liptease)
Out of interest why is French so useful for law?
Well, I'm not sure it is particularly useful for law, but I don't think any language other than English is (for English lawyers, of course). Although French is often the joint working language of international organisations, such as the EU. But not sure that would matter, since we all speak English anyway.

Put plainly, I think French is beautiful, relatively easy to become fluent in, and I'd love to live in Paris.
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Hylean
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#47
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#47
(Original post by mickeyfit)
Hi,

I am looking for suggestions on what second language would be the most beneficial for me to learn. I am a law student and am interested in working in commercial/corporate/company law when I finish. Which language would you suggest I take up that would be beneficial to my future career prospects?

Thanks
At this very instant, Icelandic with all the Icesave trouble.
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Al Kapranos
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#48
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#48
C++
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Over_The_Odds
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#49
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#49
(Original post by Edycal)
Brazil is as well on it's way to becoming a world superpower
Are we talking about the same Brazil? :eek3:
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varun55
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#50
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#50
TAMIL
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Cinematographic
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#51
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#51
(Original post by Over_The_Odds)
Are we talking about the same Brazil? :eek3:
The economic reforms of the 90s have been maintained by subsequent governments left or right. it shot out of the recession (one of the first). In fact it's going to overtake France and Britain as the 5th largest economy in couple of years.

It's a stable democracy, with ethnic, religious diversity and harmony. It still has systemic problems, but it's addressing them with gusto. I love the place. :love:
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Over_The_Odds
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#52
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#52
(Original post by Cinematographic)
The economic reforms of the 90s have been maintained by subsequent governments left or right. it shot out of the recession (one of the first). In fact it's going to overtake France and Britain as the 5th largest economy in couple of years.

It's a stable democracy, with ethnic, religious diversity and harmony. It still has systemic problems, but it's addressing them with gusto. I love the place. :love:
Brazil certainly has potential, but France and Britain are certainly not superpowers. There is a long, long, long way to go for Brazil.
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Victor-PP
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#53
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#53
(Original post by lexinuk)
I am sorry to disappoint you but I once met a school student who spoke almost perfect Russian. The guy was English himself, studied the language at A-level and spent a year in Russia. Therefore, it can be done and I, a native speaker of Russian was really impressed. I mean, really and advised him considering working for secret service .
Wow, impressive!
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