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    Hubix,
    I did not have to pay any deposits for UCL or LSE so I guess there are no financial penalties but I also got an offer from Kings where if I accepted the offer I would have had to put in a 500 pound deposit.
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    Anyone applying to anthropology?

    I got an e-mail saying they are recommending me for a place to the admissions department, and I should receive a letter of confirmation in 2-3 weeks should they agree with the recommendation.

    What does the admissions department decide, if the anthropology dept has already accepted me?
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    here's my time line for applying to material and visual culture:

    received application: 13th April
    acknowledged application: 4th may
    confirmation e-mail they are recommending me for the course to admissions: 17th May (one month early! they to me to expect a reply by the 14th of june)

    I guess each department is different. I'm supposed to find out if I get a conditional offer by 7th of June. Here's hoping!!!
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    (Original post by BeeZ)
    Thanks GreenApple88!
    You do make sense. I guess its a matter of heart over head. AArrgghh I hate decisions!
    LSE has appalling teaching quality in some courses because their 'world-renowned' experts are too busy with their worldly affairs to teach. It's a fact that some of them requires you to book an appointment, via their secretary, a month early, for a 15min consultation. I speak from experience. You may do well to talk to previous students and find out whether that course is actually good.

    UCL and Kings on the other hand has no problems of this kind. Talk to students and you will find out.
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    (Original post by hubix)
    What would be the consequences of accepting two offers and then e-mailing one of them and saying You decided not to study.

    Any financial penalty?

    Not that I want to do so but just curious.

    Hubix
    No.
    In fact, you don't HAVE to email them to say you are not coming (though that would be bad manners), because if you don't turn up in September, they know you are not coming. That's what my course tutor said - he teaches Masters in Kings as well.
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    (Original post by Rosslyn)
    No.
    In fact, you don't HAVE to email them to say you are not coming (though that would be bad manners), because if you don't turn up in September, they know you are not coming. That's what my course tutor said - he teaches Masters in Kings as well.
    Thanks

    The reason I'm asking is that I'm applying to Uni X and Uni Y. I preffer X than Y as the course offered has been my dream for ages. X will probably ask for a 1st and Y for a 2.1 I'm affraid I might slip a first by a few %. Althrough I shouldn't do so, I am therefore treating X as my Firm choice and Y as an insurance, but I will feel terrible to accept two offers, should I stick to One (X) or (Y)?. Anyone in the same situation?

    Hubix
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    (Original post by Rosslyn)
    LSE has appalling teaching quality in some courses because their 'world-renowned' experts are too busy with their worldly affairs to teach. It's a fact that some of them requires you to book an appointment, via their secretary, a month early, for a 15min consultation. I speak from experience. You may do well to talk to previous students and find out whether that course is actually good.

    UCL and Kings on the other hand has no problems of this kind. Talk to students and you will find out.
    Thanks for your insight Rosslyn.
    I heard the same same thing from quite a few students too. UCL is where I would love to go tobut the only problem is where I am from very few people have heard about it whereas LSE is very well recognized.
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    (Original post by BeeZ)
    Hi All!
    Do any of you have any idea on how well regarded the MSc in International Public Policy is? I have offers for both the MSc in Intl Public Policy at UCL and the MPA at the LSE and I am really confused on which to choose. I love the curriculum for UCL's program but I heard that career-wise LSE takes you further.
    Your insights would be truly appreciated!
    Keep in mind that these are two very different programmes. Besides the costs, studying for two years (one of them possibly abroad) to get an MPA will provide you with much more practical knowledge - not only by activities like the capstone project. The UCL degree is much more theoretical and will give you a foundation for future work rather than 'experience'. And if you wanted to go for a PhD, the latter would probably be the better option anyway.

    Regarding reputation... it depends. UCL should be (almost) as widely known as LSE in general terms - not for politics, though. I do believe in the necessity of a certain reputation of your home institution for getting interview invitations at decent companies/institutions, but someone who rejects you for having a degree from UCL instead of LSE shouldn't be on top of your list anyway.

    If I may ask, how much work experience do you have? I've decided against applying for the MPA at LSE because I just did one relevant internship (European Commission) and two of last year's students were telling me I shouldn't even think about it (these two had worked for McKinsey for two/three years).

    I'm currently holding a conditional offer for European Public Policy at UCL (and degrees at Warwick, SOAS)... waiting for the LSE one but I'd probably choose EPP at UCL if I wanted to stay in London. I liked the positive, almost 'cosy', atmosphere at the SPP there when I talked to the course coordinator some months ago.
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    (Original post by BeeZ)
    [...] UCL is where I would love to go tobut the only problem is where I am from very few people have heard about it whereas LSE is very well recognized.
    I think that outside the UK - and maybe the Commonwealth, UCL has quite a low brand name, outside academia at least. But that's the case of almost all other unis.
    People just tend to hear about Oxbridge and LSE.

    However HR departments of big companies are more aware of reputations and rankings; even if they'd never heard of it, they would check and quickly find out the "value" of UCL.
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    (Original post by grt)
    Keep in mind that these are two very different programmes. Besides the costs, studying for two years (one of them possibly abroad) to get an MPA will provide you with much more practical knowledge - not only by activities like the capstone project. The UCL degree is much more theoretical and will give you a foundation for future work rather than 'experience'. And if you wanted to go for a PhD, the latter would probably be the better option anyway.

    Regarding reputation... it depends. UCL should be (almost) as widely known as LSE in general terms - not for politics, though. I do believe in the necessity of a certain reputation of your home institution for getting interview invitations at decent companies/institutions, but someone who rejects you for having a degree from UCL instead of LSE shouldn't be on top of your list anyway.

    If I may ask, how much work experience do you have? I've decided against applying for the MPA at LSE because I just did one relevant internship (European Commission) and two of last year's students were telling me I shouldn't even think about it (these two had worked for McKinsey for two/three years).

    I'm currently holding a conditional offer for European Public Policy at UCL (and degrees at Warwick, SOAS)... waiting for the LSE one but I'd probably choose EPP at UCL if I wanted to stay in London. I liked the positive, almost 'cosy', atmosphere at the SPP there when I talked to the course coordinator some months ago.
    I agree with you. The MPA at LSE is more practical. I also was impressed with the course director at UCL and they seem much more friendly and accessible.
    I have about 8 years work experience in various corporate and non profit organizations. I worked at Siemens as the project manager for the merger between Nokia and Siemens Communications Division in my home country after which I was promoted as the Head of a department. I also worked as a consultant to a DFID funded project while currently I am a Director at a local conglomerate.
    The MPA seems attractive to me from the career standpoint whilst the UCL degree curriculum offers so much more options that I would love to take.
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    (Original post by hubix)
    Thanks

    The reason I'm asking is that I'm applying to Uni X and Uni Y. I preffer X than Y as the course offered has been my dream for ages. X will probably ask for a 1st and Y for a 2.1 I'm affraid I might slip a first by a few %. Althrough I shouldn't do so, I am therefore treating X as my Firm choice and Y as an insurance, but I will feel terrible to accept two offers, should I stick to One (X) or (Y)?. Anyone in the same situation?

    Hubix

    I am in the exact same position. Don't worry about it, it's perfectly sensible to accept firm/insurance offers. Some people will even accept all offers that come their way! They are quite used to it so don't worry about it. =)
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    (Original post by BeeZ)
    Thanks for your insight Rosslyn.
    I heard the same same thing from quite a few students too. UCL is where I would love to go tobut the only problem is where I am from very few people have heard about it whereas LSE is very well recognized.
    Lemme guess. Asia?

    LSE is a very commercial institution. UCL is far more academic. Depends on what you want to get out of your education, I suppose...
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    (Original post by Rosslyn)
    Lemme guess. Asia?

    LSE is a very commercial institution. UCL is far more academic. Depends on what you want to get out of your education, I suppose...
    Yup Asia!
    I just hate the fact that it is ingrained in the majority of us asians to choose subjects that will guarantee amazing career prospects instead of choosing something that will nurture our soul.
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    (Original post by BeeZ)
    I agree with you. The MPA at LSE is more practical. I also was impressed with the course director at UCL and they seem much more friendly and accessible.
    I have about 8 years work experience in various corporate and non profit organizations. I worked at Siemens as the project manager for the merger between Nokia and Siemens Communications Division in my home country after which I was promoted as the Head of a department. I also worked as a consultant to a DFID funded project while currently I am a Director at a local conglomerate.
    The MPA seems attractive to me from the career standpoint whilst the UCL degree curriculum offers so much more options that I would love to take.
    Thanks. I guess... well, it really depends on what you'd like to do. If you'd like to work more research based or in a semi-academic sector, the UCL degree would probably be the better choice. If it's about doing more or less managerial tasks in a more public service/NGO based context, the MPA might/should not only provide you with better opportunities but also 'complete' your CV.

    Doing both is probably not feasible but there's always the possibility to do an executive MBA (no idea if they exist for MPAs at decent institutions as well) later on if you're genuinely interested in the IPP course right now and don't only try to find the optimal degree for your career.
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    Well I finally heard back and got an offer for MSc Physics. Need a 2.i though, almost certainly not going to happen because I'm really stupid. I dunno why I even bothered.
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    Hey, I'm going to do European Public Policy in September (provided that I get a 2.i). If there's anyone else doing the same programme, get in touch
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    What's the latest date anyone has heard of receiving an offer (or rejection) in prior years?
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    (Original post by Nichrome)
    Well I finally heard back and got an offer for MSc Physics. Need a 2.i though, almost certainly not going to happen because I'm really stupid. I dunno why I even bothered.
    Firstly, you're definitely not stupid...you got an offer so they must think well of you! Secondly, getting a 2.1 is not impossible; even if you don't get the grade and instead achieve a high 2.2, admissions may still welcome you.

    But questioning why you 'even bothered' is definitely stupid . Just give it your best shot...good luck.
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    Hi

    One word...LOL

    Received an e-mail today:

    Date of Receipt: 12 May 2010
    Application Number: S76XXXX
    Programme of Study: MSc Mechanical Engineering

    bla, bla bla...
    'Your application is being considered by the selectors. You should receive a response by 07 July 2010.'

    I was expecting a reply within a week or two and now they are telling me I have to wait another 6 weeks. Hurrayyy UCL

    Hubert
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    Good luck Hubix!- I may be waiting as long as you. Still no email yet for me, although I know my application is with the department, so hopefully in June sometime
 
 
 
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