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    'dans le soir' does not sound right to me

    also, would the 5 o'clock train be 'le train de cinq heures'?

    help?
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    Just put 'le soir'
    Not sure about the train thing probably le train a cinq heures (grave accent on a)
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    (Original post by Holly704)
    Just put 'le soir'
    Not sure about the train thing probably le train a cinq heures (grave accent on a)
    Thanks

    Congratulations about Oxford, btw lol
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    I would go with "de" (so "le train de cinq heures) personally
    I believe that's one's more in common use.
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    "dans/durant la soirée" is an alternative to "le soir", "dans la soirée" is less used than "le soir" and might not be the best choice depending on context "durant would also be used in slightly different cases
    You're right about the train, saying à means something different, and doesn't make sense out of context.

    Oh and dans le matin is just so wrong it's dans/durant la matinée and the same things apply as for the evening
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    Dans le soir?....Have you heard of google translation?...be careful..can be dodgy at times!
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    Thanks!
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    Le soir, durant la soirée, (the latter being "during the evening")

    Le train de cinq heures, BUT in french you'd actually say the 24 hour-time, i.e. "le train de dix-sept heures"
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    (Original post by T-Reks)
    Dans le soir?....Have you heard of google translation?...be careful..can be dodgy at times!
    It's improved a hell of a lot actually, and provides a correct translation for "in the evening" ( "dans la soirée" ).
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    (Original post by znh)
    I know in the morning is 'dans le matin', but 'dans le soir' does not sound right to me

    also, would the 5 o'clock train be 'le train de cinq heures'?

    help?
    Don't use "dans" before matin and soir, it's wrong. Say directly "le matin" and "le soir". Same if you use "ce". For example:"ce matin je me suis réveillé (+e for female) tôt".

    For the train it depends on the context. For example you say: “the train coming from London arrives at 5 o’clock”= “le train venant de Londres arrive à 5h”.

    “I reserved tickets for the 5 o’clock train”= “j’ai reserve (e) des billets pour le train de 5h”.

    If you need more help don’t hesitate .
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    its just 'Le soir'
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    cant it be 'en soir'
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    Could use "predent le soir" - During the evening.
    Or "ce soir" - This evening.
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    (Original post by T-Reks)
    Dans le soir?....Have you heard of google translation?...be careful..can be dodgy at times!
    :facepalm:

    This is wrong. Maybe don't use Google translation and don't recommend it to people?
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    (Original post by Jeester)
    Could use "predent pendant le soir" - During the evening.
    Or "ce soir" - This evening.
    ..
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    guvbnk'l
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    ;kiuofivh
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    It depends on the context, but 'le soir' is almost always your best bet:

    In the evening, I like to watch t.v. = J'aime bien regarder la télé le soir.

    As for the train, 'le train de 5 heures' (or 17 heures) sounds fine.
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    As most said, you don't use a preposition but simply state the time of the day like "le soir". If you mean today's evening, you should probably use "ce soir", as "le soir" indicates a habit, something that happens in most evenings.

    About the train, it actually depends on what you want to emphasise.
    "Je prends le train de cinq heures" emphasises on which train are you taking.
    "Je prends le train à cinq heures" emphasises on when you're taking the train.
    Both are correct and usually you can say either one, it doesn't really matter. Personally, I uses "à" most often.

    French people do use the 24h "rule", but "17 heures" sounds rather formal. You're more likely to hear "5 heures", and "5 heures de l'après-midi" (5pm) or "5 heures du matin" (5am) if the time of the day may be ambiguous.
 
 
 
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