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Earthquakes Across The Globe: Should We be Worried? watch

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    no point being worried.
    you can't prevent an earthquake, all you do is make sure you are somehow prepared for it(although since earthquakes tend to have the 'surprise' element, this can be tricky)

    its one of those things that are not worth worrying about because really what help is worrying- what can you do?
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    Where are the tectonic plates located which align Britain?
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    How many days have I lived through when the world was supposed to end? Too many to count, that's how many. We'll be fine :smile: And if Britain does suddenly fall through a hole in the ground, I won't care due to my deadness.
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    (Original post by Lil Piranha)
    Degree level geology > year 9 geography :yep:
    we must bow to the supreme knowledge
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    That article is American, and America sometimes get severe earthquakes. If you are British, you are mistaken in giving a ****.

    Also I don't think there's any reason that earthquakes should be getting noticably more frequent or destructive than ever before. People have lived with earthquakes forever, we should really be used to it by now.
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    (Original post by Samrout)
    year 9 geography = britain will never have an earthquake
    Wrong - we do get earthquakes, they're just usually very small tremors.

    However, we're nowhere near a transform boundary, or indeed any kind of tectonic boundary. Thus the possibility of any devastating earthquake is pretty low. Worth pointing out that the Lisbon earthquake of 1755 - still one of the most powerful on record on the Richter scale, arguably the most powerful in human history - occurred several hundred miles north of the nearest plate boundary.
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    (Original post by Lil Piranha)
    Correction - Britain will never have a major earthquake that we could *predict*.

    It is unlikely, granted, but centre-plate quakes are not unheard of, and they are always violent (roughly Richter 6+) due to the shear force necessary to create such a quake.

    We are not on any major fault lines, but if we had a certain situation that put a lot of stress on the plate (it gets "stuck", for instance) and the torque of that was near us then you'd definitely know about it if it gave way!

    We get minor ones all the time, just due to "background noise", if you will, but most of which go unnoticed by everyone except seismologists.

    Degree level geology > year 9 geography :yep:
    Would you say an Earthquake in the North Atlantic ocean of the magnitude of the one in the Indian ocean (2006 richter scale-13) would cause a tsunami in Britain?
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    NO
    /thread.
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    (Original post by Samrout)
    year 9 geography = britain will never have an earthquake
    I remember an earth quake when I was doing my first degree in the north.
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    Geography Nerds > Me
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    Would you say an Earthquake in the North Atlantic ocean of the magnitude of the one in the Indian ocean (2006 richter scale-13) would cause a tsunami in Britain?
    No, I doubt it. Although anything can happen!

    But our shores are not the ideal shape for a Tsunami either (not shallow enough)
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    Would you say an Earthquake in the North Atlantic ocean of the magnitude of the one in the Indian ocean (2006 richter scale-13) would cause a tsunami in Britain?
    Who cares - it's only Ireland and poss. Wales that'll be affected. No biggie!
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    Where are the tectonic plates located which align Britain?
    As you can see from the below map, the Eurasian plate is pretty beefy and more importantly, we are a long way from any fault lines. In addition, the Mid Atlantic ridge is a constructive ridge (the plates are pulling away from each other) rather than the more troublesome colliding plates.

    In saying that, the Alps were produced by colliding plates...

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    (Original post by Lil Piranha)
    Correction - Britain will never have a major earthquake that we could *predict*.

    It is unlikely, granted, but centre-plate quakes are not unheard of, and they are always violent (roughly Richter 6+) due to the shear force necessary to create such a quake.

    We are not on any major fault lines, but if we had a certain situation that put a lot of stress on the plate (it gets "stuck", for instance) and the torque of that was near us then you'd definitely know about it if it gave way!

    We get minor ones all the time, just due to "background noise", if you will, but most of which go unnoticed by everyone except seismologists.

    Degree level geology > year 9 geography :yep:
    Degree Level Geography > Degree Level Geology! :p:

    Blatantly

    Jokes...
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    Would you say an Earthquake in the North Atlantic ocean of the magnitude of the one in the Indian ocean (2006 richter scale-13) would cause a tsunami in Britain?
    The Mid Atlantic Ridge is a divergent plate boundary i.e. two plates moving away from each other. This causes very little vertical displacement of the water column, and so a tsunami originating from the Mid Atlantic Ridge is highly unlikely, regardless of the magnitude.

    (And you can't have an EQ of magnitude 13 on the Richter Scale - it only realistically goes up to 10, and if a 13 could ever happen, it would probably crack the Earth in two :tongue:)
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    Would you say an Earthquake in the North Atlantic ocean of the magnitude of the one in the Indian ocean (2006 richter scale-13) would cause a tsunami in Britain?
    The Atlantic boundary is divergent - it is not prone to large earthquakes. If you look at where most significant earthquakes occur, they're right next to convergent or transform boundaries. Plus, Tsunamis require precise weather conditions - such as the relatively calm oceans of the low-pressure Doldrums around the equator. The North Atlantic is fairly choppy all year round thanks to our prevailing cyclonic weather.
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    Never say never with natural phenomena :p: Just when you think you know it all .. nature proves us wrong.
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    Never say never with natural phenomena :p: Just when you think you know it all .. nature proves us wrong.
    Too true. Anyone who thinks they understand mother nature are going to get stung so bad!
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    (Original post by Shivvling)
    Would you say an Earthquake in the North Atlantic ocean of the magnitude of the one in the Indian ocean (2006 richter scale-13) would cause a tsunami in Britain?
    Due to the constructive nature of the MOR (mid-Atlantic Ridge), it would be completely unexpected! The MOR is very slow-spreading, and because the plates are divergent, they spread away from each other (one towards the US, one towards us), and as such there is no stress between the plates, as they are not colliding (destructive/convergent) or rubbing against each other.

    So we are in a completely different tectonic situation from the Indian Ocean.

    But before I can answer your question properly regarding the particular situation you've highlighted, could you just check your information? I have no recollection of a MAJOR earthquake in 2006 in the Indian Ocean. Earthquakes of magnitude 10+ are incredibly, incredibly rare, and are completely unknown to science, they are hypothetical, so I would be interested to see where you got a figure of Richter 13 from??

    Are you referring to the 2004 tsunami incident? That was 9.3 on the Richter scale, which was an exceptional event in itself (remember the Richter scale is logarithmic, so a 2 is many many times more powerful than a 1, for instance).
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Degree Level Geography > Degree Level Geology! :p:

    Blatantly

    Jokes...
    Shush go do some colouring :P
 
 
 
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