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    Hi, I am studying A2 Level including in German language. I want to do a part time job as a translator, preferably from home. Is that going to be possible for me?
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    I looked into doing the same thing when I'd finished A2 and was told that it wasn't the best thing in all honesty if you're not completely fluent (which you aren't at that stage). I think its a lot more beneficial to have a qualification or experience with translation (some companies also require that) and it would be quite difficult. Freelancing can be quite diffcult as well as you may need specialist equipment (specialist dictionaries, translation software) which you may have to pay for yourself and you may not get a lot come in.
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    I work full-time as a freelance translator. The degree of ability required is way beyond what you reach at A-level, and much of the material I translate requires a knowledge of other fields such as law, business etc. and a well-developed ability to find terminology. On top of that, I think it's unlikely an agency or client would assign jobs to you unless you have a degree or translation qualification of some kind.

    If you're interested in a career in translation in the long term, I would recommend that as well as pursuing your study of German, it would also be beneficial to study a non-language subject such as law, science, business or something like that to a high level, because that would help you specialise in that area as a translator. I didn't do that, and although I'm doing quite well, it does mean that I sometimes have to turn jobs down when I know I wouldn't have the knowledge required.
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    (Original post by Aelred)
    I didn't do that, and although I'm doing quite well, it does mean that I sometimes have to turn jobs down when I know I wouldn't have the knowledge required.
    Didn't do that either and I'm finding it hard.
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    (Original post by hannah_dru)
    Didn't do that either and I'm finding it hard.
    Which language pair(s) do you work in? Finding clients can be tough, I got a bit lucky with some of mine randomly finding me, but there's always the danger that one day they might stop needing you. Are you registered on any websites for translators like www.proz.com or www.translatorscafe.com? Another thing that really helped me was working in an "unusual" pair (Romanian-English), as there are hardly any native English speakers among my competitors.

    It's possible to get by without studying anything other than languages, so take heart And there's always the chance to do that later, e.g. through the OU. I haven't ruled out the idea of doing some kind of course in law, but the trouble is that they all seem to be very intensive and now that my career has taken off, I don't know where I'd find the time.

    You made a sensible choice with German, which I dropped after A-level. I tried to get an in-house job after graduating but the fact that my degree was in French and Russian made it impossible. I could have tried in France, I suppose, but instead I ended up taking a job with an NGO for a few years before going freelance. Although in-house jobs are few and far between at the best of times, German is definitely the best language to have if you're looking for one. Of course, you could always start up on your own independently, though.
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    (Original post by Aelred)
    Which language pair(s) do you work in? Finding clients can be tough, I got a bit lucky with some of mine randomly finding me, but there's always the danger that one day they might stop needing you. Are you registered on any websites for translators like www.proz.com or www.translatorscafe.com? Another thing that really helped me was working in an "unusual" pair (Romanian-English), as there are hardly any native English speakers among my competitors.

    It's possible to get by without studying anything other than languages, so take heart And there's always the chance to do that later, e.g. through the OU. I haven't ruled out the idea of doing some kind of course in law, but the trouble is that they all seem to be very intensive and now that my career has taken off, I don't know where I'd find the time.

    You made a sensible choice with German, which I dropped after A-level. I tried to get an in-house job after graduating but the fact that my degree was in French and Russian made it impossible. I could have tried in France, I suppose, but instead I ended up taking a job with an NGO for a few years before going freelance. Although in-house jobs are few and far between at the best of times, German is definitely the best language to have if you're looking for one. Of course, you could always start up on your own independently, though.
    I'm not a freelancer, I'm an intern on my year abroad atm and I hope to get offered a permanent position in the office after I graduate. I think I'm gonna see how I get on with specialised areas and think about it later if I get offered the job, though with what I get paid I don't know that I could afford it. I do like medicine and law is ok, but I do a lot of marketing.

    That's actually what my boss did with the company I work for, but I really like it here and would love to stay. I originally wanted to be a freelancer but I don't know that I like the idea anymore. I think French, Russian, Romanian and English is great though. Most people who I work with translate in about 3-4 languages so I feel a bit rubbish in that I only do German-English.
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    (Original post by hannah_dru)
    I'm not a freelancer, I'm an intern on my year abroad atm and I hope to get offered a permanent position in the office after I graduate. I think I'm gonna see how I get on with specialised areas and think about it later if I get offered the job, though with what I get paid I don't know that I could afford it. I do like medicine and law is ok, but I do a lot of marketing.

    That's actually what my boss did with the company I work for, but I really like it here and would love to stay. I originally wanted to be a freelancer but I don't know that I like the idea anymore. I think French, Russian, Romanian and English is great though. Most people who I work with translate in about 3-4 languages so I feel a bit rubbish in that I only do German-English.
    I see. If you like working where you are now, then yes, I think it makes sense to wait and see if they offer you a permanent position. Looking towards the longer term, of medicine and law, I'd say law is probably easier to specialise in, assuming no prior knowledge of either. I do a lot of Russian legal documents despite not having any legal training as such (though I had a certain amount of exposure to legal parlance when I worked for the NGO, and have since learnt enough about Russian criminal law to be able to translate confidently in that field now).

    Freelancing has its advantages and disadvantages. On the plus side, I'm my own boss, can schedule my day exactly as I like, can travel around and work from any location where I have Internet access, and am earning quite a lot more than I ever did as an employee. I also like the variety of what I'm translating. For a short time I had an in-house job where I translated media articles day in, day out, so I felt I wasn't learning anything and it got pretty tedious, whereas my freelance work has been far more interesting. And commuting is something I don't miss. The downside for me is the isolation, which isn't a big problem for me most of the time, but every now and then I do wish I was working in an office with other people.

    If at some point you decide to pick up another language to translate from, I think the fact that you're already translating German should help you pick up another language faster than you would have done otherwise. Sometimes I find that things I learn when translating from one of my languages (especially English terms) later come in useful when I'm translating from one of the others. And if you can get your head around the intricacies of German grammar, you shouldn't have too much difficulty transferring that skill to another language. For now, you could focus on making your English writing skills as polished as possible and honing your research skills, because those will stand you in good stead later on if you decide to gain specialist knowledge and/or add another language.
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    (Original post by Aelred)
    I see. If you like working where you are now, then yes, I think it makes sense to wait and see if they offer you a permanent position. Looking towards the longer term, of medicine and law, I'd say law is probably easier to specialise in, assuming no prior knowledge of either. I do a lot of Russian legal documents despite not having any legal training as such (though I had a certain amount of exposure to legal parlance when I worked for the NGO, and have since learnt enough about Russian criminal law to be able to translate confidently in that field now).

    Freelancing has its advantages and disadvantages. On the plus side, I'm my own boss, can schedule my day exactly as I like, can travel around and work from any location where I have Internet access, and am earning quite a lot more than I ever did as an employee. I also like the variety of what I'm translating. For a short time I had an in-house job where I translated media articles day in, day out, so I felt I wasn't learning anything and it got pretty tedious, whereas my freelance work has been far more interesting. And commuting is something I don't miss. The downside for me is the isolation, which isn't a big problem for me most of the time, but every now and then I do wish I was working in an office with other people.

    If at some point you decide to pick up another language to translate from, I think the fact that you're already translating German should help you pick up another language faster than you would have done otherwise. Sometimes I find that things I learn when translating from one of my languages (especially English terms) later come in useful when I'm translating from one of the others. And if you can get your head around the intricacies of German grammar, you shouldn't have too much difficulty transferring that skill to another language. For now, you could focus on making your English writing skills as polished as possible and honing your research skills, because those will stand you in good stead later on if you decide to gain specialist knowledge and/or add another language.
    I haven't got any knowledge of either. I do find law a lot harder than medicine though but I've only done the basics in both and I usually get correspondence for law which is a pain if I don't know what's gone on beforehand. But I think you're right, it's the research that counts.

    That makes sense. I quite like the idea of being able to organise my day the way I like as I know I'm able knuckle down when I need to, but my office seems to be quite flexible. I prefer working by myself but I think it would probably get lonely and I've met a lot of great people here. I can see where that would've gotten tedious. Whilst I do still enjoy marketing and media, it does get on my nerves sometimes because that's mainly what I get, but because I'm an intern they started giving me lots of areas.

    I hope so. I'm not sure whether my brain could handle it.
 
 
 
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