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the "dyslexia" excuse EXTRA TIME! WTH? watch

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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Yes, in that sense I was referring to what an examination is a test of. An examination is not an IQ test. It should be reflective of your language capabilities, comprehension and information processing speed. You sadly are deficient in these areas but you should not receive more time solely because you are.
    Erm no, an exam tests your level of understanding of an area of a subject.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Erm no, an exam tests your level of understanding of an area of a subject.
    I'd love to see what his argument is for my Hemiplegia, which effects the side of my body I'm meant to write with.
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    (Original post by franchango)
    So I agree with the whole extra time for dyslexics in exams and stuff, and that example above was really good in proving why.

    But just out of interest, aren't there levels of dyslexia? Like you can be mildly dyslexic, severely dyslexic, or somewhere in between. So how come no matter how dyslexic you are, everyone gets the same AMOUNT of extra time in exams? (usually 25% more, I've heard). Surely the more dyslexic you are, the more time you need, and the less you are the less time you need. So why isn't extra time proportional?

    At my school there was supposed to be a sliding barrier. Anywhere from 5% extra time up to 25%. However, because it would have been too much work for the exam invigilators they just gave everyone 25% because they (the invigilators!) are lazy *******.

    (Original post by Jelkin)
    I also think that if a few people are allowed to use laptops, everyone should. In one of my finals I got 73 and 74 for the first two essays and then 56 for the third because I ran out of time - if I'd been able to type the paper I would have dominated! Sure, some people are slow at handwriting, but my handwriting is only moderate speed and is FAR slower than typing would ever be.
    I get to use a word processor in my exams. (There isn't a spell checker on it BTW). It's not actually because of my dyslexia but because of my dyspraxia (which is what I also get extra time for. My dyslexia doesn't affect my reading speed (well it affects my reading speed out loud as I can't pronounce the words and stumble but in my head my reading is awesome) just my spelling and writing style.
    The reason why I get the computer is because my dyspraxia means that I lack the fine motor controls to hold a pen properly. (Being left-handed doesn't help here as all my teachers in primary school were right-handed and I was never really taught how to write properly anyway.) My handwriting is bad anyway. I'm actually faster at writing than I am at typing (well actually I'm 5wpm faster typing BUT my spelling is worst when I type (I don't know why) and that slows me down a lot) but anyway, because of how I hold my pen I get hand ache ridiculously quickly. Like after 2 or 3 sentences of writing (Actually, example here: if I'm writing out my address my hand will be aching by the time I get to the postcode). Therefore my already messy handwriting becomes illegible and even I can't read it, let alone somebody marking it. So that's why I get a word processor. Most people can write legibly in exams, and yes their hand may start to ache after a while, but nowhere near as fast as mine does.
    Oh and before anyone says "But you're just being lazy! You can practise your handwriting and make it better!". I've had three years of having handwriting lessons twice a week. I've had all the funky pens, being taught all the different techniques, tried all the different ways that lefties can write and nothing has made a blind bit of difference.
    Actually, if I forget to take my laptop to my lectures I tend to write my notes in Tengwar Script. It doesn't make my hand hurt as much and it's easier to keep legible but I can hardly write exams in it, now can I? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    because otherwise people wouldnt leave their seats....ever.
    Fine - Why don't the exam boards allow regular candidates the same amount of time as dyslexic candidates?
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Erm no, an exam tests your level of understanding of an area of a subject.
    Yes, alongside you ability to convey what you mean, your ability to understand what is asked of you, your ability to write coherently, your ability to answer the question appropriately.
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    (Original post by DMV)
    I'd love to see what his argument is for my Hemiplegia, which effects the side of my body I'm meant to write with.
    That is a physical problem which affects your capacity to carry out the actual task of writing. I am not arguing against that.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Yes, alongside you ability to convey what you mean, your ability to understand what is asked of you, your ability to write coherently, your ability to answer the question appropriately.
    So if you are missing your writing arm then you can no longer write coherently and so therefore should be marked down because of this?
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    So if you are missing your writing arm then you can no longer write coherently and so therefore should be marked down because of this?
    That is a physical problem which affects your capacity to carry out the actual task of writing. I am not arguing against that.

    We've been over this before.
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    (Original post by DaGianni)
    Fine - Why don't the exam boards allow regular candidates the same amount of time as dyslexic candidates?
    because the dyslexic candidates have more work to do.

    imagine that the next time you did an exam, your question paper was written in a foreign language. even though you would be answering the same question as everybody else, you would have more work to do than them.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    because the dyslexic candidates have more work to do.
    So do less intelligent candidates who take longer to solve problems.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    That is a physical problem which affects your capacity to carry out the actual task of writing. I am not arguing against that.

    We've been over this before.
    There is no difference, they both affect it, they would both affect it in a job. Therefore explain the difference.
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    if people are lying, and your truly feel that strongly about it, then tell a member of staff.

    but be careful: students don't just get extra time without having been tested for dyslexia by professionals.

    and don't join in - you know its wrong. just be thankful that you don't have to struggle on with a learning difficulty like dyslexia.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    There is no difference, they both affect it, they would both affect it in a job. Therefore explain the difference.
    No. Not having an arm does not affect you ability to convey what you mean, your ability to understand what is asked of you, your ability to write coherently, your ability to answer the question appropriately. It affects the actual task of writing. Dyslexia not does affect the actual task of writing, if affects the thought-process. This is where the difference lies.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    So do less intelligent candidates who take longer to solve problems.
    like ive said. the dyslexic extra time thing isnt about taking longer to solve problems...its about having more problems to solve.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    because the dyslexic candidates have more work to do.

    imagine that the next time you did an exam, your question paper was written in a foreign language. even though you would be answering the same question as everybody else, you would have more work to do than them.
    Irrelevant - If you give all candidates the time usually allocated to dyslexic candidates (hell, why not give them even more time than that?), then all candidates will have ample time to finish the questions and check their answers; nobody is at a disadvantage.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    What are you foaming about? If you can't debate properly, then don't bother posting. Less intelligent people are disadvantaged against more intelligent people, should we give them more time to level up the playing field? No, obviously not.
    I'll do what I want. This isn't a debate, its some clown, i.e you (as you can't seem to understand what i'm saying) making a retarded point and acting as if your some kinda of superior. Guess what, your not. Being less inteligent is something you can help, you can get tuition etc, no one is stopping them. You can't help being dyslexic. Its stuck with you for life, can you read properly? Yea, LIFE. And being less inteligent does not mean that they need extra time. A really stupid person may still be able to finish the exam, albeit with wrong answers in the same time as someone who excels. Your argument is therefore flawed. The whole point of giving someone with dyslexia extra time is because they have trouble writing/reading.

    So please, don't come at me with that inteligence crap, its nothing to do with time. Your just lucky someone hasn't picked up on that before now, so your probably not going to reply to this, oh well. If you can't debate properly, don't bother posting.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    its about having more problems to solve.
    I strongly refute this. What exactly do you mean? It means you are less able to think in a coherent fashion, which is something that an examination is a marker of.
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    I won't bother responding to genuine morons either. Futile task don't cha' no?
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    No. Not having an arm does not affect you ability to convey what you mean, your ability to understand what is asked of you, your ability to write coherently, your ability to answer the question appropriately. It affects the actual task of writing. Dyslexia not does affect the actual task of writing, if affects the thought-process. This is where the difference lies.
    You can't convey it as fast as you can't write as fast as your other hand.

    Your ability to write coherently it does, few can write well with there other hand.

    So what difference?
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    I strongly refute this. What exactly do you mean? It means you are less able to think in a coherent fashion, which is something that an examination is a marker of.
    Its like taking the exam in a foreign language....even if the questions are the same, the fact that you have to translate everything gives you more work to do.
 
 
 
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Updated: August 17, 2013
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