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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    You can't convey it as fast as you can't write as fast as your other hand.

    Your ability to write coherently it does, few can write well with there other hand.

    So what difference?
    The difference is that the thought-process is not affected.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    Its like taking the exam in a foreign language....even if the questions are the same, the fact that you have to translate everything gives you more work to do.
    Yes, and that's the same as less-mathematically inclined people not being able to visualise concepts and problems as well as others.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    The difference is that the thought-process is not affected.
    Exams are about your knowledge of a subject not your thought-process? Or they would just have cognitive tasks.
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    I'm enjoying this. Let's keep it rolling, guys.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Exams are about your knowledge of a subject not your thought-process? Or they would just have cognitive tasks.
    This
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Exams are about your knowledge of a subject not your thought-process? Or they would just have cognitive tasks.
    No. For example; in history, a key component of your ability to write a decent essay rests in your capability to write coherently, piece ideas together, link concepts to the next etc etc.

    As opposed to just splurging out everything you know on a subject, which would be a test solely of knowledge.
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    Question - Do the people that think dyslexics should be given extra time in examinations think that savants (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savant_syndrome) should be given less time than regular and dyslexic candidates, due to their inherent advantage over other candidates?
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Yes, and that's the same as less-mathematically inclined people not being able to visualise concepts and problems as well as others.
    you are not even reading things are you? you are so ******* determined to win the argument you are not paying attention.

    less mathematically inclined people who cannot visualise concepts and problems as well as others have a problem with the subject matter.

    dyslexic people understand the subject matter perfectly capably, but they struggle to understand what is being asked of them.


    There is a distinct difference between somebody who cannot do a subject and somebody who cannot access a subject.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    you are not even reading things are you? you are so ******* determined to win the argument you are not paying attention.

    less mathematically inclined people who cannot visualise concepts and problems as well as others have a problem with the subject matter.

    dyslexic people understand the subject matter perfectly capably, but they struggle to understand what is being asked of them.


    There is a distinct difference between somebody who cannot do a subject and somebody who cannot access a subject.
    No. It's not the subject matter. It's the way that their brain operates. Their mathematical ability is just a by-product of that.
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    Keep it clean please, by all means have a discussion but insults will not be tolerated =)
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    (Original post by DaGianni)
    Question - Do the people that think dyslexics should be given extra time in examinations think that savants (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savant_syndrome) should be given less time than regular and dyslexic candidates, due to their inherent advantage over other candidates?
    I like this point.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    No. It's not the subject matter. It's the way that their brain operates. Their mathematical ability is just a by-product of that.
    that doesnt make sense. you are just making things up now.
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    im dyslexic and dysphraxic and dyscalculor (I dont know what it is properly) and only mildly but I get extra time, my own classroom and a laptop.

    Its not possible to fake the test.
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    Every dyslexic i know is pretty stupid. I think for most people it is a way of saying "okay you are thick but we are going to give you a label so you don't feel bad". Middle class parents with stupid kids can't accept this fact so they get their kids tested.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    that doesnt make sense. you are just making things up now.
    No, I am not. Your ability at anything is just by-product of the functioning of your brain.
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    (Original post by explosions hurt)
    Every dyslexic i know is pretty stupid. I think for most people it is a way of saying "okay you are thick but we are going to give you a label so you don't feel bad".
    I refute this. I know several smart dyslexics who are medical students for example. They've got perfect academic records.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    What are you foaming about? If you can't debate properly, then don't bother posting. Less intelligent people are disadvantaged against more intelligent people, should we give them more time to level up the playing field? No, obviously not.
    no becasue they have the capability to improve thier intelligence but dyslexics will not become faster readers.
    it is completely fair to say that some people are more intellagent then other and some people learn faster than others, 'naturally' but everyone still has the potential to improve. everyone has to work on weaknesses. however this is not what we are talking about.
    if a person who is naturally (or genetically) not very good at reading but they do not have any learning disbilities then it means that they can learn to read and it is thier responsibility to do the extra work needed. with a dyslexic they should also work to improve at reading but they will only ever get to a cirtain speed and will not be able to improve. so people who are genetically not academic and people who are dyslexic are not compareable.
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    (Original post by CASmmj)

    Its not possible to fake the test.
    It is, I have done so as part of some research.
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    no becasue they have the capability to improve thier intelligence but dyslexics will not become faster readers.
    it is completely fair to say that some people are more intellagent then other and some people learn faster than others, 'naturally' but everyone still has the potential to improve. everyone has to work on weaknesses. however this is not what we are talking about.
    if a person who is naturally (or genetically) not very good at reading but they do not have any learning disbilities then it means that they can learn to read and it is thier responsibility to do the extra work needed. with a dyslexic they should also work to improve at reading but they will only ever get to a cirtain speed and will not be able to improve. so people who are genetically not academic and people who are dyslexic are not compareable.
    There is a limit to everything. If there was not, then all known mathematical problems would be solved. Everyone has a natural limit. And, that is not solely why you are wrong. You are basically saying that if you are not dyslexic, then you must work continuously to develop your abilities - which is a little unfair. Just because someone has the capacity and someone does not, it doesn't mean that the capable person must improve whilst the less capable person should be given special privileges.
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    they could actually have dyslexia, you know.

    besides the tests are very hard, im sure anyone who completed them would be diagnosed with dyslexia...
 
 
 
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