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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    I am not going to repeat myself numerous times, read my previous posts.

    Dyslexia is certainly an abnormality, as many things are, and it may well be a disability but that is not to say that dyslexic examination candidates should receive additional time because of it. Being dyslexic means that your brain functions differently. Less intelligent people's brain will function differently to more intelligent people's brain. If you apply consider dyslexia to be a disability, then we must say that less intelligent people are disabled in comparison to more intelligent people. Sad as that may be, in no sense does that mean they should receive additional time.

    We must remember an exam is not an IQ test. In part, it should be reflective of your language capabilities, comprehension and information processing speed. For example; in history, a key component of your ability to write a decent essay rests in your capability to write coherently, piece ideas together, link concepts to the next etc etc. As opposed to just splurging out everything you know on a subject, which would be a test solely of knowledge.
    You are correct exams are not IQ Tests; and it means the most intelligent people may not even get the highest mark. Your first paragraph is utterly distorted. Someone who has 120 IQ and revises nothing is likely to get lower than that of a person with 100 IQ and revises for a month. Being naturally smart gives an advantage in the beginning but it does take you the whole way.

    The point is this, being dyslexic has nothing to do with intelligence. End of.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    You are correct exams are not IQ Tests; and it means the most intelligent people may not even get the highest mark. Your first paragraph is utterly distorted. Someone who has 120 IQ and revises nothing is likely to get lower than that of a person with 100 IQ and revises for a month. Being naturally smart gives an advantage in the beginning but it does take you the whole way.

    The point is this, being dyslexic has nothing to do with intelligence. End of.
    The amount of revision you do is utterly irrelevant. If you are dyslexic, then your ability to write coherently, piece ideas together, link concepts to the next is less. Examinations are a measure of things such as these.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Christ, how many times. The amount of revision you do is utterly irrelevant. If you are dyslexic, then your ability to write coherently, piece ideas together, link concepts to the next is less. Examinations are a measure of things such as these.
    Which means that dyslexic students are at a disadvantage, and to level the playing field they receive extra time.

    There is a difference between people who are not very smart and reach their full potential in exams and those that are smart but are disadvantaged by something such as dyslexia.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    Which means that dyslexic students are at a disadvantage, and to level the playing field they receive extra time.

    There is a difference between people who are not very smart and reach their full potential in exams and those that are smart but are disadvantaged by something such as dyslexia.
    They're at no less of a disadvantage as less intelligent people whose brains do not function as well as more intelligent people, as I made explicitly clear in my previous post.

    Less intelligent people are disadvantaged by having less intelligence.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    They're at no less of a disadvantage as less intelligent people whose brains do not function as well as more intelligent people, as I made explicitly clear in my previous post.
    The point there is less intelligent people can not achieve high grades in exam without putting extensive work into preparation - dyslexic people can achieve these grades exactly the same as a person of the same intelligence and preparation, only when they get into the exam there is trouble with the way they see things.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    The point there is less intelligent people can not achieve high grades in exam without putting extensive work into preparation - dyslexic people can achieve these grades exactly the same as a person of the same intelligence and preparation, only when they get into the exam there is trouble with the way they see things.
    Yeah, and that's the issue. But just because there is that very trouble, does not mean they should get more time.

    It would be beneficial for them to have it, but that does not mean they should have it.
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    i love that this argument is still going on
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Yeah, and that's the issue. But just because there is that very trouble, does not mean they should get more time.
    Basically it is so that everyone has an equal chance of achieving their best. If you think, giving a less intelligent person extra time shouldn't make any difference because if they are less intelligent we wouldn't be judging how fast they finish the test and they need time to finish it, we'd be judging how well they answered the question. And if they are less intelligent they will not answer the question as well in any amount of time. They reach their full potential or close to it. Whereas a dyslexic person needs the extra time in order to reach their full potential and express their true intelligence.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    Basically it is so that everyone has an equal chance of achieving their best. If you think, giving a less intelligent person extra time shouldn't make any difference because if they are less intelligent we wouldn't be judging how fast they finish the test and they need time to finish it, we'd be judging how well they answered the question. And if they are less intelligent they will not answer the question as well in any amount of time. They reach their full potential or close to it. Whereas a dyslexic person needs the extra time in order to reach their full potential and express their true intelligence.
    No, that is not true. If we gave everyone else as much time as in given to dyslexics, then they would have more time to extend their essays/solve equations that they have not had the time to do. If everyone else had more time, then I absolutely guarantee that they would get more marks. Furthermore, it's not about potential, it's about what you can do in an exact amount of time. We must remember, an examination is not a measure of potential.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    Basically it is so that everyone has an equal chance of achieving their best. If you think, giving a less intelligent person extra time shouldn't make any difference because if they are less intelligent we wouldn't be judging how fast they finish the test and they need time to finish it, we'd be judging how well they answered the question. And if they are less intelligent they will not answer the question as well in any amount of time. They reach their full potential or close to it. Whereas a dyslexic person needs the extra time in order to reach their full potential and express their true intelligence.
    Of course giving a less intelligent person more time will help them do well. Sometimes, it's not just about having the knowledge, it's about thinking about it, applying it, and writing it down in the allotted time.

    I really don't know where to stand on the issue of extra time for dyslexics, but I don't agree with "let's give them more time so they can achieve their potential". Then, let's just give non-dyslexic stupid people far longer, so they can get some extra marks?
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    No, that is completely wrong. If we gave everyone else as much time as in given to dyslexics, then they would have more time to extend their essays/solve equations that they have not had the time to do. If everyone else had more time, then I absolutely guarantee that they would get more marks. Furthermore, it's not about potential, it's about what you can do in an exact amount of time. An examination is not a measure of potential.
    Then basically that is like saying that no one completes their test. I had a test today and completed it without needing any of my extra time; some people left early because they had finished it and could do no more.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    Then basically that is like saying that no one completes their test. I had a test today and completed it without needing any of my extra time; some people left early because they had finished it and could do no more.
    What? I'm not sure what you mean here.

    If everyone has the same amount of time, then their ability will be matched equally against the same standards. They can chose to do what they like with the time; doodle, scrunch up their paper or work out the answers - it's up to them. It may be that there is not enough time for everyone to finish their individual paper, but everyone will have had the same amount of time, which is fair. Everyone should be provided with exactly the same conditions in which to take the exam.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    No, that is not true. If we gave everyone else as much time as in given to dyslexics, then they would have more time to extend their essays/solve equations that they have not had the time to do. If everyone else had more time, then I absolutely guarantee that they would get more marks. Furthermore, it's not about potential, it's about what you can do in an exact amount of time. An examination is not a measure of potential.
    bro listen dude i think dyslexic people deserve more time, but i really think it comes down to how 'dyslexic' they are, but you push a pretty good point should the less intellegent get extra time? i mena if we did an IQ test i got 80 and you got 120 should i get more time than you? Its a different scenario really if i had a low IQ i probably shouldn't be taking the same exam as you lol, with dyslexia offcourse its more of a problem of not understanding things on first site and thus extra time is needed to help them read but yh i agree in a sense of some people who are actually really suffering from exam nerves claim to be 'dyslexic'
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    Of course giving a less intelligent person more time will help them do well. Sometimes, it's not just about having the knowledge, it's about thinking about it, applying it, and writing it down in the allotted time.

    I really don't know where to stand on the issue of extra time for dyslexics, but I don't agree with "let's give them more time so they can achieve their potential". Then, let's just give non-dyslexic stupid people far longer, so they can get some extra marks?
    It's wrong to say they are stupid, they may just not perform in exams as well as others. The "intelligent" people we are referring to are those that do well in exams, people that are not as good in exams it may just come down to they no phrasing their answers well enough. This won't change with extra time. The extra time for dyslexia students is so that they can read and re-read their work and the questions.
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    (Original post by samzurai)
    bro listen dude i think dyslexic people deserve more time, but i really think it comes down to how 'dyslexic' they are, but you push a pretty good point should the less intellegent get extra time? i mena if we did an IQ test i got 80 and you got 120 should i get more time than you? Its a different scenario really if i had a low IQ i probably shouldn't be taking the same exam as you lol, with dyslexia offcourse its more of a problem of not understanding things on first site and thus extra time is needed to help them read but yh i agree in a sense of some people who are actually really suffering from exam nerves claim to be 'dyslexic'
    It's about the way your brain operates. Each person's operates differently, but just because some people's operate less effectively, that does not mean they should be given special privileges in order to reduce that problem.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    It's wrong to say they are stupid, they may just not perform in exams as well as others. The "intelligent" people we are referring to are those that do well in exams, people that are not as good in exams it may just come down to they no phrasing their answers well enough. This won't change with extra time. The extra time for dyslexia students is so that they can read and re-read their work and the questions.
    I've had exams where I could have improved my answer with 15 extra minutes. But I didn't get extra time. Therefore, surely I was reaching "my true potential"?

    I'm not really against dyslexics having extra time. I'm very undecided about whether I think it's fair or not.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    What? I'm not sure what you mean here.

    If everyone has the same amount of time, then their ability will be matched equally against the same standards. They can chose to do what they like with the time; doodle, scrunch up their paper or work out the answers - it's up to them. It may be that there is not enough time for everyone to finish their individual paper, but everyone will have had the same amount of time, which is fair. Everyone should be provided with exactly the same conditions in which to take the exam.
    It may take a dyslexic person longer to read the test, which means that they are at a disadvantage to ANY other student, smart or not so smart.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    It may take a dyslexic person longer to read the test, which means that they are at a disadvantage to ANY other student, smart or not so smart.
    It takes some people more time to work out how to solve maths problems. According to you this means they are disadvantaged. Yes, they are - but they shouldn't be given more time because of it. It just means they are less capable at solving maths problems within a given time.

    And also, some less intelligent people who are not dyslexic cannot read as quickly as others - should they be given more time? No, obviously not.
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    I've had exams where I could have improved my answer with 15 extra minutes. But I didn't get extra time. Therefore, surely I was reaching "my true potential"?

    I'm not really against dyslexics having extra time. I'm very undecided about whether I think it's fair or not.
    Think about it like this, if you were dyslexic you may have been behind by 30 marks instead of 15. This is the point I'm trying to make, if there was a person who was identical to you but they were dyslexic they would be at a disadvantage when it came to both of you doing the exact same paper.
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    Of course giving a less intelligent person more time will help them do well. Sometimes, it's not just about having the knowledge, it's about thinking about it, applying it, and writing it down in the allotted time.

    I really don't know where to stand on the issue of extra time for dyslexics, but I don't agree with "let's give them more time so they can achieve their potential". Then, let's just give non-dyslexic stupid people far longer, so they can get some extra marks?
    intresting dude! But seriously my teacher who is dyslexic gets loads of spelling errors even with simple words! And can't figure out questions on first site she re reads like 10 times! Wish consumes time, but i mean it depends on the level of dyslexia, i would feel disadvantaged to guy more clever than me and getting more time then me obviously? I mean is he deserving of more time? He is more clever than he shouldn't need the extra time?, just because he makes errors? Don't we all?
 
 
 
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