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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    Think about it like this, if you were dyslexic you may have been behind by 30 marks instead of 15. This is the point I'm trying to make, if there was a person who was identical to you but they were dyslexic they would be at a disadvantage when it came to both of you doing the exact same paper.
    But what about another totally different person who managed to write a brilliant answer in the correct time? If I had another 15 minutes, I could have done the same... :p:
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    It takes some people more time to work out how to solve maths problems. According to you this means they are disadvantaged. Yes, they are - but they shouldn't be given more time because of it. It just means they are less capable at solving maths problems within a given time.
    Preparation is more important than intelligence when it comes to exams. If they are well prepared it will take them less time to work out the problem than it would if they were not. This is where the phrase 'Practice makes perfect' comes into play. If you practice 8x8 over and over you'll know if as fast as anyone whatever the intelligence.

    It's not like dyslexic students take the exam later so they have more time to revise and practice.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    It's about the way your brain operates. Each person's operates differently, but just because some people's operate less effectively, that does not mean they should be given special privileges in order to reduce that problem.
    hmm. yes and no, i think yes because lets say a scenario, i'm dyslexic i read my question 10 times and you who are not dyslexic understand it by reading it twice. in order to make it 'fair' shouldn't we extend the time of person who reads it 10 times? OK but i disagree about the privaleges in a situation that is beyond exams privlages like extra loans and all those benefits given perhaps there is an issue!, if there is a dyslexic technician and a normal technician for a company as a consumer you should expect both the techs to finish roughly the same time! Not an extra 25% offcourse not, so yh im not sure to be honest lol
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    Preparation is more important than intelligence when it comes to exams. If they are well prepared it will take them less time to work out the problem than it would if they were not. If they are less intelligent this shouldn't effect their speed of calculation. This is where the phrase 'Practice makes perfect' comes into play. If you practice 8x8 over and over you'll know if as fast as anyone whatever the intelligence.

    It's not like dyslexic students take the exam later so they have more time to revise and practice.
    No. I am not talking about preparation. I am talking about their intrinsic ability to visualise mathematical concepts. No amount of preparation will change this. Some will be worse at visualising mathematical concepts than other, but just because they are is no reason to give them additional time.
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    But what about another totally different person who managed to write a brilliant answer in the correct time? If I had another 15 minutes, I could have done the same... :p:
    Examinations normally give you enough time to complete the answers if you are not disadvantaged as are people with dyslexia. You are not disadvantaged compared to the person who did a brilliant answer in the correct time.
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    (Original post by samzurai)
    hmm. yes and no, i think yes because lets say a scenario, i'm dyslexic i read my question 10 times and you who are not dyslexic understand it by reading it twice. in order to make it 'fair' shouldn't we extend the time of person who reads it 10 times? OK but i disagree about the privaleges in a situation that is beyond exams privlages like extra loans and all those benefits given perhaps there is an issue!, if there is a dyslexic technician and a normal technician for a company as a consumer you should expect both the techs to finish roughly the same time! Not an extra 25% offcourse not, so yh im not sure to be honest lol
    Well, look. Just because they need to read a question more times, is no reason to give them more time to read it. It is exactly the same as less able students who take longer to visualise mathematical problems, or the time it takes some students to think about how to write an essay. It may take these students longer, but that is no reason to give them more time.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    Examinations normally give you enough time to complete the answers if you are not disadvantaged as are people with dyslexia. You are not disadvantaged compared to the person who did a brilliant answer in the correct time.
    My brain didn't think as fast as his did. Should I get extra time to compensate for that? After all, were it not for my slow-thinking brain, I'd have completed the answers perfectly.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    No. I am not talking about preparation. I am talking about their intrinsic ability to visualise mathematical concepts. No amount of preparation will change this. Some will be worse at visualising mathematical concepts than other, but just because they are is no reason to give them additional time.
    Examinations are supposed to take into consideration all of the different levels when visualising mathematical concepts because it might take someone 1-2 minutes longer to, however when it comes to dyslexia it effects every question rather than some and therefore 20 or so minutes is needed extra.

    I never got extra time in maths but I am dyslexic.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Well, look. Just because they need to read a question more times, is no reason to give them more time to read it. It is exactly the same as less able students who take longer to visualise mathematical problems, or the time it takes some students to think about how to write an essay. It may take these students longer, but that is no reason to give them more time.
    i think your right here!, but you see dyslexia is such a distorted phrase these days that just about anyone slaps it on their surname!, its controversial to how can you distinguish a dyslexic and a less able candidate, the less able candidate has the chance to 'improve' and the dyslexic person cannot 'improve' if you know what im saying which i personally think is ridiculous so i know where you're coming from
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    My brain didn't think as fast as his did. Should I get extra time to compensate for that? After all, were it not for my slow-thinking brain, I'd have completed the answers perfectly.
    Normally, this isn't the case, you should be able to complete the test in the allotted time because you have equal opportunity.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    Examinations are supposed to take into consideration all of the different levels when visualising mathematical concepts because it might take someone 1-2 minutes longer to, however when it comes to dyslexia it effects every question rather than some and therefore 20 or so minutes is needed extra.

    I never got extra time in maths but I am dyslexic.
    This argument is an admission of defeat. Firstly, exams do not take into consideration all levels of ability when determining the amount of time it lasts for. If this was the case, then they would go on for several hours in order to accommodate for less ability candidates. Secondly, you cannot say that it's fine to discount this 1-2 minute excess that some people need whilst at the same time saying that it is necessary to count the additional 20 minutes that you need. In addition, who are you to say that it is only a 1-2 minute difference. I'm sure there are some mathematical questions which take some people at least 20 minutes more to comprehend.

    It does not matter that you do not receive additional time in maths in the slightest. At the moment, we are not debating that but instead, as to whether people who take longer to visualize problems in maths should receive more time. If you argue that you deserve more because of your dyslexia, then the same argument applies to them and consequently, they should receive more as well.

    For the moment, I am no longer going to post in this thread. I've posted numerous times and feel that everything that has been thrown my way, I've answered completely. I maintain my opinion that dyslexics should receive no additional time. What they should receive however, is careful management of their dyslexia (look up management of dyslexia on wikipedia if you doubt me) in order that they improve on the necessary reading and writing skills that exams require of them.

    I may make a summary of my position later and post that up.


    (Original post by Anomoly)
    My brain didn't think as fast as his did. Should I get extra time to compensate for that? After all, were it not for my slow-thinking brain, I'd have completed the answers perfectly.
    Normally, this isn't the case, you should be able to complete the test in the allotted time because you have equal opportunity.
    If you too are given exactly the same amount of time, then you will also have that same equal opportunity.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    Normally, this isn't the case, you should be able to complete the test in the allotted time because you have equal opportunity.
    Well dyslexic people have the same opportunity aswell.

    Look, you say dyslexics should get more time since they are disadvantaged in reading etc. OK, fair enough, then people who take longer to think of things should get more time, since they are disadvantaged in writing out their answer etc.
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    (Original post by samzurai)
    i think your right here!, but you see dyslexia is such a distorted phrase these days that just about anyone slaps it on their surname!, its controversial to how can you distinguish a dyslexic and a less able candidate, the less able candidate has the chance to 'improve' and the dyslexic person cannot 'improve' if you know what im saying which i personally think is ridiculous so i know where you're coming from
    People of the same intelligence can revise the same amount of time but when it comes to the exam the dyslexic person will be disadvantaged. Simple as.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    This argument is an admission of defeat. Firstly, exams do not take into consideration all levels of ability when determining the amount of time it lasts for. If this was the case, then they would go on for several hours in order to accommodate for less ability candidates. Secondly, you cannot say that it's fine to discount this 1-2 minute excess that some people need whilst at the same time saying that it is necessary to count the additional 20 minutes that you need. In addition, who are you to say that it is only a 1-2 minute difference. I'm sure there are some mathematical questions which take some people at least 20 minutes more to comprehend.

    It does not matter that you do not receive additional time in maths in the slightest. At the moment, we are not debating that but instead, as to whether people who take longer to visualize problems in maths should receive more time. If you argue that you deserve more because of your dyslexia, then the same argument applies to them and consequently, they should receive more as well.

    For the moment, I am no longer going to post in this thread. I've posted numerous times and feel that everything that has been thrown my way, I've answered completely. I maintain my opinion that dyslexics should receive no additional time. What they should receive however, is careful management of their dyslexia (look up management of dyslexia on wikipedia if you doubt me) in order that they learn the necessary reading and writing skills that exams require of them.

    I may make a summary of my position later and post that up.



    If you too are given exactly the same amount of time, then you will also have that same equal opportunity.

    It comes down to one sentence: People of the same intelligence can revise the same amount of time but when it comes to the exam the dyslexic person will be disadvantaged. Simple as.

    Mathematical concepts shouldn't really come into it at all, dyslexia effects the majority when it comes to English. Some cases it effects Maths however dyslexic people and non-dyslexic people are all the same when it comes to thinking of mathematical concepts.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    It comes down to one sentence: People of the same intelligence can revise the same amount of time but when it comes to the exam the dyslexic person will be disadvantaged. Simple as.
    No it ******* doesn't. Have you read anything of what I've said?

    It does not matter that you do not receive additional time in maths in the slightest. At the moment, we are not debating that but instead, as to whether people who take longer to visualize problems in maths should receive more time. If you argue that you deserve more because of your dyslexia, then the same argument applies to them and consequently, they should receive more as well.

    You are wrong.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    It comes down to one sentence: People of the same intelligence can revise the same amount of time but when it comes to the exam the dyslexic person will be disadvantaged. Simple as.
    Why is the dyslexic person disadvantaged in your eyes, but someone who cannot think very quickly not disadvantaged?
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    No it ******* doesn't. Have you read anything of what I've said?

    It does not matter that you do not receive additional time in maths in the slightest. At the moment, we are not debating that but instead, as to whether people who take longer to visualize problems in maths should receive more time. If you argue that you deserve more because of your dyslexia, then the same argument applies to them and consequently, they should receive more as well.

    You are wrong.
    dyslexic people and non-dyslexic people are all the same when it comes to thinking of mathematical concepts.
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    Why is the dyslexic person disadvantaged in your eyes, but someone who cannot think very quickly not disadvantaged?
    Because a dyslexic person may not think as fast as any one else. There are different levels of thinking speed whether you are dyslexic or not.
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    (Original post by Anomoly)
    dyslexic people and non-dyslexic people are all the same when it comes to thinking of mathematical concepts.
    How can you possibly say that? We would all be Einsteins then. Why can only about 0.1% of the population visualise any concept of infinity?

    I'm gonna have to stop 'debating' with you.
 
 
 
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