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how to cope with this? watch

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    (Original post by licensedX)
    again i repeat the question....
    Why are you being so insensitive? May I ask you what you're going to do when a wife is crying next to your patient, her dying husband? Tell her to deal with it? People have rough times in their lives and her nerves are probably a sign of how much it all means to her and I'm sure she'll be able to relate well to struggling patients as she would've gone through similar things herself. Just because people go through hard times emotionally it doesn't mean they can't cope with them.

    OP, I think people on this thread have given you some really great, sound advice. I really admire your dedication for going through the application process again, definitely shows commitment. As you've said, just be yourself, try to relax and not to let the nerves get the better of you, I wish you the very best of luck.
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    (Original post by SuicidalLemming)
    Thank you! At least someone has some sense
    sense?....just throwing it out there but to go on Diazepam after that just seems, in my personal opinion,....to be psychologically/emotionally weak. Which is something I have no qualms about looking down upon, and make no apologies for. We live in a society today where too many people are coddled when they need, to put it bluntly, man the **** up.
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    ^^^famous last words of a doctor to patient ... before being struck off the register..
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    sense?....just throwing it out there but to go on Diazepam after that just seems, in my personal opinion,....to be psychologically/emotionally weak. Which is something I have no qualms about looking down upon, and make no apologies for. We live in a society today where too many people are coddled when they need, to put it bluntly, man the **** up.
    totally agree....
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    sense?....just throwing it out there but to go on Diazepam after that just seems, in my personal opinion,....to be psychologically/emotionally weak. Which is something I have no qualms about looking down upon, and make no apologies for. We live in a society today where too many people are coddled when they need, to put it bluntly, man the **** up.
    Wow. I suppose that does answer my question. I'd hate to have a heart of stone, emotionally detached from everything. It's not a sign of weakness go be passionate about something you care about, or equally be traumatised by an horrific accident. Some people seek a more communicative and, I suppose, friendly way, of dealing with issues kindly. Rather than just dismissing it and telling someone to 'man the **** up'. Further, a GP prescribed the drug, I'm sure s/he knows a lot more about what's necessary.
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    sense?....just throwing it out there but to go on Diazepam after that just seems, in my personal opinion,....to be psychologically/emotionally weak. Which is something I have no qualms about looking down upon, and make no apologies for. We live in a society today where too many people are coddled when they need, to put it bluntly, man the **** up.
    LOL!

    GMC fail.
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    sense?....just throwing it out there but to go on Diazepam after that just seems, in my personal opinion,....to be psychologically/emotionally weak. Which is something I have no qualms about looking down upon, and make no apologies for. We live in a society today where too many people are coddled when they need, to put it bluntly, man the **** up.
    hahaha... you are still young and lively, just wait till you grow up a bit more and become a bit more mature than now, you will understand what rest of us are talking about.:o:

    going to GP and stuff is a bit extreme i have to admit but the reason for this thread is to get some sound and wise thoughts from people who's already been there and done that so that I can develop a mindset before the interview.
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    (Original post by Woody.)
    Wow. I suppose that does answer my question. I'd hate to have a heart of stone, emotionally detached from everything. It's not a sign of weakness go be passionate about something you care about, or equally be traumatised by an horrific accident. Some people seek a more communicative and, I suppose, friendly way, of dealing with issues kindly. Rather than just dismissing it and telling someone to 'man the **** up'. Further, a GP prescribed the drug, I'm sure s/he knows a lot more about what's necessary.
    Scandalised! Firstly...it's well known that GP's have an awful tendency to overprescribe drugs such as antidepressants etc, so not neccessarily. The answer to everything does not lie in a pill. I'd also hate to be a detached mofo with a heart of stone...luckily I'm not. Yes, people have different ways of dealing with things. But I don't agree with the majority of them, such as this girl.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    LOL!

    GMC fail.
    :p: quite possibly
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    (Original post by vutterman)
    hahaha... you are still young and lively, just wait till you grow up a bit more and become a bit more mature than now, you will understand what rest of us are talking about.:o:

    going to GP and stuff is a bit extreme i have to admit but the reason for this thread is to get some sound and wise thoughts from people who's already been there and done that so that I can develop a mindset before the interview.
    No you, I understand and admire for the persistence. What will you do if you don't get in this year?
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    Scandalised! Firstly...it's well known that GP's have an awful tendency to overprescribe drugs such as antidepressants etc, so not neccessarily. The answer to everything does not lie in a pill. I'd also hate to be a detached mofo with a heart of stone...luckily I'm not. Yes, people have different ways of dealing with things. But I don't agree with the majority of them, such as this girl.
    I never ever said that the GP was right/wrong. I said that s/he is going to know a lot more about what's necessary to prescribe. Despite the alleged veritable ease with which they prescribe antidepressants, the GP will know a heck of a lot more than you or I in what should've been given in this situation.
    The answer to everything doesn't lie in strict discipline and telling people to man up either. Why not show some compassion? Clearly she's been through a pretty tough time and then you add salt to the wound by being insensitive and implying that she wouldn't be able to cope well in her chosen career path.
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    (Original post by Woody.)
    I never ever said that the GP was right/wrong. I said that s/he is going to know a lot more about what's necessary to prescribe. Despite the alleged veritable ease with which they prescribe antidepressants, the GP will know a heck of a lot more than you or I in what should've been given in this situation.
    The answer to everything doesn't lie in strict discipline and telling people to man up either. Why not show some compassion? Clearly she's been through a pretty tough time and then you add salt to the wound by being insensitive and implying that she wouldn't be able to cope well in her chosen career path.
    But my point is, she hasn't been through a tough time! Certainly not tough enough to be put on prescription drugs - things could be a lot worse, in fact I'd say things are a lot worse for most people, so bleating about her traumatic experiences is neither wanted or indeed needed. If she cannot cope with this, how will she cope when she's standing in the middle of A&E on a saturday night, just graduated from med school, surrounded my various drunken injuries with 7 nurses asking her what they should do as she's the only medic available. The stress caused by this, and the knowledge that potentially you make the difference between life and death is surely x100 worse, so is she planning to self medicate for the next 40 years? I have plenty of compassion, but for people who deserve it.
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    Your views are much distorted, madame.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Your views are much distorted, madame.
    I dunno dude, think she has a fair point. This other lil lady does seem quite yellow bellied....I've always thought that what really sets the med students/medics apart from the rest is that ability to cope with the high stress' of life. Surely she wasn't so nervous for her interview that she needed prescription drugs just because she had a car accident (something, I'm sure, we've all experienced).
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    (Original post by sirdoc)
    I dunno dude, think she has a fair point. This other lil lady does seem quite yellow bellied....I've always thought that what really sets the med students/medics apart from the rest is that ability to cope with the high stress' of life. Surely she wasn't so nervous for her interview that she needed prescription drugs just because she had a car accident (something, I'm sure, we've all experienced).
    :lolwut:

    You can't generalise people's emotions and reactions. Everyone copes differently to different circumstances. If you do generalise, you run the risk of prejudice, i.e. what YOU consider to be serious and ignoring what is important to a patient (exactly what is happening here). She finds it important, to the extent that she feels she cannot cope. Also diazepam isn't that fun, you get a nasty hangover effect with it. Some people get palpitations when they go on stage. Is it wrong they get prescribed beta blockers? Some people get carsick, to the extent that they cannot visit their grandparents over christmas. Is it wrong they get prescribed cyclizine?

    And saying all about medics/students? Have you any idea how many medics suffer from mental illness? Drug abuse and alcoholism is sky high! Noone is immune from stress. If you want a biochemical model, look at the pain gate theory. That is why some people cry like a baby with a cannula whereas some people can withstand the most tremendous pain without analgesia.
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    sense?....just throwing it out there but to go on Diazepam after that just seems, in my personal opinion,....to be psychologically/emotionally weak. Which is something I have no qualms about looking down upon, and make no apologies for. We live in a society today where too many people are coddled when they need, to put it bluntly, man the **** up.
    i find that peeple who write stuff like this are the ones who ave got it easy in momma's armpit all their life.

    they've never needed to test themselves at all, but get off on letting themselves believe that they are better than others by kidding themselves that they do more. thus they 'ave a reason for reading medicine - becos it makes them feel better than others, and they do love that feeling.
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    Wow you're a *****. One of my friends ended up in a coma for four days and I stayed with her through all of that, another one had horrific internal injuries and they thought he was going to die, so excuse me for thinking that life was a bit sucky. Getting in a car after nearly dying was a bit scary for me, I apologise :rolleyes: I'd hate to have you as my doctor.
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    (Original post by SuicidalLemming)
    Wow you're a *****. One of my friends ended up in a coma for four days and I stayed with her through all of that, another one had horrific internal injuries and they thought he was going to die, so excuse me for thinking that life was a bit sucky. Getting in a car after nearly dying was a bit scary for me, I apologise :rolleyes: I'd hate to have you as my doctor.

    I really do sympathize with your case, but I think a better approach would have been to contact the medicals school BEFORE your interview, and let them know of the extenuating circumstances you experienced. That way, they would be able to make a much more informed decision.

    In my opinion, I don't really agree with the use of Diazepam before the interview to calm you down, I was petrified before my first interview - so much to the extent that hadn't slept 4 nights before it - but you really have to try and deal with it. I don't mean that in the 'man up' way which the previous poster suggested, I mean deal with it in the sense of learning to combat fears. As such, I feel much more ready for my upcoming interviews already knowing that I had overcome the nerves once before.
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    But my point is, she hasn't been through a tough time! Certainly not tough enough to be put on prescription drugs - things could be a lot worse, in fact I'd say things are a lot worse for most people, so bleating about her traumatic experiences is neither wanted or indeed needed. If she cannot cope with this, how will she cope when she's standing in the middle of A&E on a saturday night, just graduated from med school, surrounded my various drunken injuries with 7 nurses asking her what they should do as she's the only medic available. The stress caused by this, and the knowledge that potentially you make the difference between life and death is surely x100 worse, so is she planning to self medicate for the next 40 years? I have plenty of compassion, but for people who deserve it.
    How on Earth can you say that she hasn't been through a tough time? You have no idea how traumatic things may be in her life and you can't assume that it's nothing. As digitalis pointed out, it's similar to people who get car sick on car journeys.
    Part of what medschool does is to prepare you for what you will experience as a doctor. I'm not doubting that being the only doctor in A&E is going to be absolutely terrifying, but you're going to be well trained before that happens. Different people cope in different ways, just because it's different to how you cope with stress doesn't mean it's the 'wrong' way.

    (Original post by SuicidalLemming)
    Wow you're a *****. One of my friends ended up in a coma for four days and I stayed with her through all of that, another one had horrific internal injuries and they thought he was going to die, so excuse me for thinking that life was a bit sucky. Getting in a car after nearly dying was a bit scary for me, I apologise :rolleyes: I'd hate to have you as my doctor.
    I don't want to preach to you, but I don't see the need to retaliate with hostility. I also think Andrew has a point to a certain extent.
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    But my point is, she hasn't been through a tough time! Certainly not tough enough to be put on prescription drugs - things could be a lot worse, in fact I'd say things are a lot worse for most people, so bleating about her traumatic experiences is neither wanted or indeed needed. If she cannot cope with this, how will she cope when she's standing in the middle of A&E on a saturday night, just graduated from med school, surrounded my various drunken injuries with 7 nurses asking her what they should do as she's the only medic available.
    she will ask the nurses.

    plus other staff.

    in much the same way as she is asking colleagues now, only some of them are being tossers, which is far more stressful in the workplace, i can tell you that for nothing.
 
 
 
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