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    My point is simply that Haiti should have learned to cope on its own years ago. It is a dysfunctional nation, largely as a result of its people. Lazy, ill-disciplined and kept in chains by their strong adherence to religion. They have way too many kids, that they simply can't support. It's chaotic and violent. Nature should be allowed to take its course, quite frankly the world would not be much worse off if Haiti was wiped out by this natural disaster.

    Now let's focus on the UK, and get it back to being the great power it once was.
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    (Original post by dotherma)
    LOL. And you think that because there are more university educated citizens in a country, that it's economy is necessarily better. Get real. Same in the UK, the proportion of young people graduating uni is at its highest ever. The fact is that a good proportion of these "highly skilled" graduates are doing silly degrees such as pysiotherapy (not an academic subject last time I checked) or computer science at the University of East London.

    Is it any wonder that so many grads these days are unemployed? By the way, the US is on the decline- unemployment numbers are the highest they have been in a long time, and sooner or later it will lose its place as the number one economy in the world. It's influence on the world stage is also decreasing sharply, particularly after the economic crisis.

    Ditto for the UK. Let's start helping ourselves, not places like Haiti.
    The economy is starting to be driven more and more by innovation, by research, by engineering, by technology, and less by manufacturing. What kind of industry would you want the UK and US to focus on?

    Some people will do less academic degrees but that's to be expected in a population, people will have different aptitudes and so will go into different areas.

    There is high unemployment because this is a world depression, even China has it's highest unemployment levels for 30 years, not many countries have escaped it, none of the large countries especially.

    The best way to help ourselves is to keep on funding education, improving it, and to help the world develop so that, with a very capitalist mindset, the market for our goods increases and there is increased mutually beneficial trade. To seperate from the rest would lead to an even worse result.
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    (Original post by ......?)
    The economy is starting to be driven more and more by innovation, by research, by engineering, by technology, and less by manufacturing. What kind of industry would you want the UK and US to focus on?
    OK, the three largest economies in the EU are Germany, France and UK.

    Why is it that Germany and France (who both have sizeable manufacturing sectors) pulled out of recession months ago, but the UK is still in recession as we speak and is likely to be for the next few months?

    A pure service sector economy is a stupid idea, as the current UK economy shows.
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    Where's your heart man?! You have to put yourself in their shoes; how would you feel if that was you and you'd just lost your house, you had no money or food all the while coping with the grief of having just lost a loved one. If other countries are in a postion to help they should, simple as!!
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    It's influence on the world stage is also decreasing sharply, particularly after the economic crisis.
    Its influence will also wane as demographics change to resemble Mexico.

    California's financial unraveling has prompted a long-overdue debate about taxes, regulation, and government spending, but the state's media and government continue to ignore what could be an even greater problem: the irreparable damage to California's human capital that nearly 30 years of unrestrained illegal immigration has achieved...

    For a closer glimpse of what's in store for California, look at the Los Angeles Unified School District, the largest in California and the second largest in the country. Of its roughly 700,000 students, almost three-quarters are Hispanic, 8.9 percent are white, and 11.2 percent are black. More than half of the Latino students (about 300,000) are "English learners" and, depending on whether you believe the district or independent scholars, anywhere between a third and a half drop out of high school, following significant attrition in middle school. A recent study by UC Santa Barbara's California Dropout Research Project estimates that high-school dropouts in 2007 alone will cost the state $24.2 billion in future economic losses.
    Even those who graduate aren't necessarily headed to success. According to one study, 69 percent of Latino high-school graduates "do not meet college requirements or satisfy prerequisites for most jobs that pay a living wage." It is difficult to see how the majority-Hispanic labor force of the future can provide the skills that the sophisticated Los Angeles economy demands. Already studies show that as many as 700,000 Los Angeles Latinos and some 65 percent of the city's illegal immigrants work in L.A.'s huge underground economy.

    The unhappy picture in Los Angeles is replicated to one degree or another across much of California and is taking a huge toll on the state's economic competitiveness and long-term prospects. California's educational system, once easily the best in the country, is today mired in mediocrity near the bottom among the 50 states as judged by National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) tests in math, science, reading, and writing. And for the first time in its history, California is experiencing an increase in adult illiteracy. In 2003, it had the highest adult illiteracy in the United States, 23 percent nearly 50 percent higher than a decade earlier. In some counties (Imperial at 41 percent, Los Angeles at 33 percent) illiteracy approaches sub-Saharan levels.
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...ryId=112167023
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    [QUOTE=Chi019]It's influence will also wane as demographics change to resemble Mexico.

    Yup. China on the rise, US + UK are shooting themselves in the foot. Simple as.
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    (Original post by Chucklefiend)
    A nation such as Japan prepares for such eventualities because they are an intelligent, resourceful and strong country. Haiti was poorly prepared for a scenario such as this, i.e. their health system was poor, education was poor and buildings were not designed to withstand earthquakes, despite the fact that the country is positioned precisely between two colliding tectonic plates. It is this kind of weakness and lack of foresight that would be extinguished, without mercy, in the natural world.
    Sometimes the humane thing to do is to let nature take its course.
    Except for the fact that Japan could do that because the US gave them aid after destroying their country. They still don't have their own military and can spend that money on other things.

    Without the US military backing and funding for reconstruction, Japan would never have emerged as quickly, or if at all, from WWII.

    Also, we're better than animals. Darwin is not right on a normative level for human interactions.
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    Also, we're better than animals. Darwin is not right on a normative level for human interactions.
    Right, but contraception needs to be a condition of future aid. As I said above, the place was overpopulated at 3 million, now up to 9 million and 40% of their govt spending comes from aid.
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    Having an unlimited number of children is not a human right. Many countries will continue to decline/remain a failure unless they acknowledge this. Places like China and Korea have, and this is one of the reasons for their ongoing rise/success. How any impoverished citizen in any country should be allowed to have nine kids, with no chance of supporting them or affording them an education is beyond me.

    Should be illegal, simple as.
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    (Original post by dotherma)
    OK, the three largest economies in the EU are Germany, France and UK.

    Why is it that Germany and France (who both have sizeable manufacturing sectors) pulled out of recession months ago, but the UK is still in recession as we speak and is likely to be for the next few months?

    A pure service sector economy is a stupid idea, as the current UK economy shows.
    The UK isn't a pure service sector economy, it's about 75% service, France is about 70% and Germany is a bit less but still close. This might benefit Germany and France for a couple of months but in the long term having more of the economy service based will benefit the UK. There is a lack of natural resources to really make that our priority, our best resource we have is the education system combined with the service industry, for such a small country we have some of the most prestigous universities in the world and one of the biggest financial centers.

    Your idea of going back to manufacturing would be shooting ourselves in the foot.
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    (Original post by ......?)
    The UK isn't a pure service sector economy, it's about 75% service, France is about 70% and Germany is a bit less but still close. This might benefit Germany and France for a couple of months but in the long term having more of the economy service based will benefit the UK. There is a lack of natural resources to really make that our priority, our best resource we have is the education system combined with the service industry, for such a small country we have some of the most prestigous universities in the world and one of the biggest financial centers.

    Your idea of going back to manufacturing would be shooting ourselves in the foot.
    LOL. What a tool. Best education system? The education system is pitiful, the higher education in the country amongst the easiest in Europe (this coming from a law graduate at a top 10 UK uni).

    The UK economy is entirely reliant upon the City, which, whilst strong, has been on the decline for a couple of years now. As for the UK education system, UK uni = three years of piss up rather.
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    (Original post by Chi019)
    Right, but contraception needs to be a condition of future aid. As I said above, the place was overpopulated at 3 million, now up to 9 million and 40% of their govt spending comes from aid.
    It isn't overpopulation, it's a lack of development, Haiti is 30th for population desnity, would you say the Netherlands, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore or Monaco need to introduce compulsory contraception?

    Overpopulation is just an exscuse, increased development and better education/healthcare leads to lower birthrates, not the other way round.
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    Look, to improve hellholes like Haiti, you need to lay down some tough rules. If you are going to give them aid, you need some solid targets to be achieved. It's like giving candy to a little kid; reward it for achievements. If you keep out giving candy gratuitously, the kid becomes lazy, bloated and trapped in a cycle of addiction/reliance upon sweets.

    Haiti finds itself in this position. It's time for rules, and expectations to be imposed upon these places. I don't feel sorry for Haiti because it has had countless opportunities to improve, yet it makes no effort to do so.
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    (Original post by dotherma)
    LOL. What a tool. Best education system? The education system is pitiful, the higher education in the country amongst the easiest in Europe (this coming from a law graduate at a top 10 UK uni).

    The UK economy is entirely reliant upon the City, which, whilst strong, has been on the decline for a couple of years now. As for the UK education system, UK uni = three years of piss up rather.
    I don't know if you'll agree or disagree with this, but I wasn't expecting such a positive review.



    "UK universities do well in our rankings for several reasons. One is that they excel in a wide range of subjects, whereas these other systems mainly measure scientific research. Even Imperial College, despite its science-oriented mission, has a well-regarded business school and other social science departments.




    But at its heart, the UK’s international success in higher education reflects deliberate government policy. While the UK has around 130 universities, the vast majority of the research funding they receive only goes to about a quarter of them. These are essentially the institutions we see in the rankings. The British government has recently announced that it intends to go on doing this, despite the objections of more modest institutions.



    Despite acute reservations from within the more egalitarian education systems of continental Europe, the message is getting through to politicians that this approach works. This is why Germany launched the €1.9 billion Excellence Initiative under which research cash is being concentrated in nine universities. It is also why the European Commission set up the European Research Council in a bid to build a small number of globally-competitive research teams across the continent. The ERC is now announcing its first major awards.



    In recent years the UK government has concentrated funding and increased the total amount it spends on research. The upshot is that of the five British institutions in our top 20, three - Cambridge, Oxford and Imperial - have a perfect 100 in our academic peer review, which accounts for 40% of a university’s possible final score. The other two, University College London (UCL) and Edinburgh, score 98 and 97 respectively on this measure. Interestingly, this concentration of cash does not seem to produce highly cited research. The UK’s top institution in our count of citations per faculty member is UCL with 90 out of a possible 100, behind 36 other universities from around the world.



    The other qualitative measure we use, employer opinion, shows the UK in an even more positive light. Here six UK universities score a perfect 100 and six more get 99, a massive endorsement by any standard.



    The popularity of British universities with employers is especially helpful at a time when they are involved in a fierce marketing battle with other institutions both at home and abroad, not to mention when there is domestic political debate about university fees and the value of a degree. Their attractiveness to students from around the world is shown by our data on international student numbers. The London School of Economics is top in the world here and Imperial also scores 100, while UCL, Oxford and Cambridge score 99, 97 and 96 respectively."

    http://www.topuniversities.com/artic...rsity-rankings
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    (Original post by ......?)
    I don't know if you'll agree or disagree with this, but I wasn't expecting such a positive review.



    "UK universities do well in our rankings for several reasons. One is that they excel in a wide range of subjects, whereas these other systems mainly measure scientific research. Even Imperial College, despite its science-oriented mission, has a well-regarded business school and other social science departments.




    But at its heart, the UK’s international success in higher education reflects deliberate government policy. While the UK has around 130 universities, the vast majority of the research funding they receive only goes to about a quarter of them. These are essentially the institutions we see in the rankings. The British government has recently announced that it intends to go on doing this, despite the objections of more modest institutions.



    Despite acute reservations from within the more egalitarian education systems of continental Europe, the message is getting through to politicians that this approach works. This is why Germany launched the €1.9 billion Excellence Initiative under which research cash is being concentrated in nine universities. It is also why the European Commission set up the European Research Council in a bid to build a small number of globally-competitive research teams across the continent. The ERC is now announcing its first major awards.



    In recent years the UK government has concentrated funding and increased the total amount it spends on research. The upshot is that of the five British institutions in our top 20, three - Cambridge, Oxford and Imperial - have a perfect 100 in our academic peer review, which accounts for 40% of a university’s possible final score. The other two, University College London (UCL) and Edinburgh, score 98 and 97 respectively on this measure. Interestingly, this concentration of cash does not seem to produce highly cited research. The UK’s top institution in our count of citations per faculty member is UCL with 90 out of a possible 100, behind 36 other universities from around the world.



    The other qualitative measure we use, employer opinion, shows the UK in an even more positive light. Here six UK universities score a perfect 100 and six more get 99, a massive endorsement by any standard.



    The popularity of British universities with employers is especially helpful at a time when they are involved in a fierce marketing battle with other institutions both at home and abroad, not to mention when there is domestic political debate about university fees and the value of a degree. Their attractiveness to students from around the world is shown by our data on international student numbers. The London School of Economics is top in the world here and Imperial also scores 100, while UCL, Oxford and Cambridge score 99, 97 and 96 respectively."

    http://www.topuniversities.com/artic...rsity-rankings
    The UK has some excellent universities. However, so do many other European nations.

    There is one main reason, over all others, that the UK is a popular destination for overseas students. And it is strikingly obvious; employability. Employers want people who, above all, can speak English. English is the quintissential business language.
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    I can't understand why we give money to foreigners, when we have pensioners freezing in their own homes and being forced to sellup to pay for their care. We have soldiers familes in accomodation not fit for purpose, we seemily can't keep our hospitals clean and adequately staffed, or grit /salt side roads and pavements.

    Our defence budget is being hacked to pieces and I expect no one will moan until someone picks on us. It is a frankly disgusting attitude coming from the government and anyone giving aid. And even before this earthquake the country was a third would ******** because they can't run their country .I say leave them to it.
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    Yes, to let nature take its course is humanity, but only in primitive society. Seriously, would anyone believe that all the civilization being achieved in our society is nothing more than the nature course?
    As to the Haitians aid, I think it's our duty to let those sufferers know that they are not alone, they've got help facing with nature disaster by donation or other means of aid. Can't blame anyone for not have the same thought cause not all people are civilized after all since their survival is just the nature course.
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    We don't really. We just pretend to because there's been a natural disaster. Nobody gave a **** about Haiti 2 weeks ago (despite it being the poorest western hemisphere country with a per capita GDP of ~$1000 and a literacy rate of 52%). Nobody will give a **** about Haiti a month from now.


    People think that they're helping but in reality they just donate and 'care' to make themselves feel all warm bright and fuzzy on the inside.

    If you (collectively) cared you would have cared 2 weeks ago, 2 months ago, 2 years ago. :rolleyes:
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    Why are people giving money now...when they are told to? Haiti was been suffering for years and years, with tons and tons of people dying from disease, TB, HIV, children being sold as slaves, everyone living in poverty, no education, half of them don't have access to health care. No one gave a **** then. Once Haiti is no longer in the news, no one will care again....

    (Original post by HDS)
    .
    We think alike =_____= lol
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    Wow the author of this thread is a jackass.
 
 
 
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