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    hey. i need a bit of help on a few particle physics questions.

    "the highest energy produced from an accelerator is 1800 GeV. would this by high enough to boil a kettle of water?" what am i supposed to do? like find the mass or something?

    also, "why have experiments to find the graviton have so far been unsuccessful. suggest a reason for this."

    thanks in advance
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    What is 1800 GeV, in joules?

    The energy needed to produce a graviton even for a short period of time is colossal. You know that 1800 GeV is our max atm. Do they equate?
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    (Original post by Devp93)
    hey. i need a bit of help on a few particle physics questions.

    "the highest energy produced from an accelerator is 1800 GeV. would this by high enough to boil a kettle of water?" what am i supposed to do? like find the mass or something?

    also, "why have experiments to find the graviton have so far been unsuccessful. suggest a reason for this."

    thanks in advance
    Do you know how to turn GeV in to joules? Do you know how to turn 1eV in to one joul?
    You can work out how much energy is needed to boil a kettle by knowing the specific heat capacity of water and making some good estimates.


    Gravitons are notoriously hard to detect; understand and explain why, and that's your answer to the second question.
    edit: Ricky's answer is a better one for the second question (Y)
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    1800x10^9x1.6x10^-19 is the joules, now how is that in comparison to the energy required to boil a kettle?

    Well the graviton is believed to be very very very small & massless.
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    (Original post by Wesssty)
    1800x10^9x1.6x10^-19 is the joules, now how is that in comparison to the energy required to boil a kettle?

    Well the graviton is believed to be very very very small & massless.
    If you just write down the number of joules in 1800 GeV

    1800 * 10^9 * 1.602 * 10^ -19 = 2.88*10^-7 J

    Think about it. 0.000000288 Joules. Is that going to boil a kettle? I was think about the latent heat capacity and stuff MEX, but I think this question is simpler than that.

    For the second question. All you need to do is suggest a reason. The reason is we do not yet have particle accelerators that can produce the energy required to produce gravitons, although this is hopefully to be done with the LHC.
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    (Original post by Ricky116)
    What is 1800 GeV, in joules?

    The energy needed to produce a graviton even for a short period of time is colossal. You know that 1800 GeV is our max atm. Do they equate?
    these are two seperate questions. the first doesnt relate to the second
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    (Original post by Devp93)
    these are two seperate questions. the first doesnt relate to the second
    Actually - they can be related. The first one tells us the max energy we can attain in a particle accelerator is less than the energy needed to produce a graviton.

    Also, you're very welcome for all the help you've received here. Nice to see how extremely grateful you appear to be. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    Actually - they can be related. The first one tells us the max energy we can attain in a particle accelerator is less than the energy needed to produce a graviton.

    Also, you're very welcome for all the help you've received here. Nice to see how extremely grateful you appear to be. :rolleyes:
    lol. well they were two different questions that i had to answer and didnt actually need to be related.

    Plus i did say "thanks in advance" ^^
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    (Original post by Devp93)
    lol. well they were two different questions that i had to answer and didnt actually need to be related.

    Plus i did say "thanks in advance" ^^
    You seem completely incapable of being polite. I certainly won't be helping you again on these boards.

    Good luck in your exams, see you around.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    You seem completely incapable of being polite. I certainly won't be helping you again on these boards.

    Good luck in your exams, see you around.
    That's a bit harsh isn't it?

    OP, it requires around half a million joules to boil a kettle (give or take a few %). That's of the order 10^25 eV. Maybe I'm missing something but there's no way a particle accelerator could boil a kettle.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    You seem completely incapable of being polite. I certainly won't be helping you again on these boards.

    Good luck in your exams, see you around.
    thank you for the good wishes sir. (how was that :P)
 
 
 
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