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    So I was thinking, there are so many people who apply for medicine who hadn't wanted to do medicine at A-level...

    This means people didn't get any offers, missed their grades, along with people who COULDN'T even apply at A level due to their grades, then you have the few that have that profound moment at much older age aka 25+ and want to do medicine, then you have random people that just want a career completely unrelated to their degree, and only thought about medicine recently..

    Whereas at Alevel, you could only REALLY apply to medicine directly to the courses if you had the right combo A levels (science) and right grades although there are a select few with a pre-med course.

    I just didn't realise! Its made me think why Grad entry medicine is so competitive, and why there are twothree courses intact in order to provide applicants with these kind of profiles..

    Your thoughts... no advice needed.
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    I believe GEP programmes were originally set up with a view to noctors becoming doctors if they so wished, and it was then hijacked by your list of groups (and even more importantly in terms of numbers, used as a backup for those wanting to do medicine from A level).
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    (Original post by terpineol)
    I believe GEP programmes were originally set up with a view to noctors becoming doctors if they so wished, and it was then hijacked by your list of groups (and even more importantly in terms of numbers, used as a backup for those wanting to do medicine from A level).
    I don't think that's true. They were actually set up as part of the overall strategy to allow wider access to medicine, as it was recognised that the profession would benefit from attracting people from a wider range of backgrounds.
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    (Original post by foxyamy)
    I don't think that's true. They were actually set up as part of the overall strategy to allow wider access to medicine, as it was recognised that the profession would benefit from attracting people from a wider range of backgrounds.
    The profession would benefit, or the wider public would benefit? (not a personal dig, but my ponderances on the issue incase that looks like an aggressive line to take).
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    (Original post by terpineol)
    The profession would benefit, or the wider public would benefit? (not a personal dig, but my ponderances on the issue incase that looks like an aggressive line to take).
    If the profession benefits surely the public benefit as a result, no?
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    (Original post by fortysixandtwo)
    If the profession benefits surely the public benefit as a result, no?
    My thoughts exactly. :yep:

    But then I would be biased, considering I am one of those GEP applicants
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    There are plenty of people in this world that acted like idiots in high school but changed and developed at there time of there first degree , living away from perents etc can have a serous and mature change on a young person.

    Just one of the reasons why GEP is a good idea.
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    (Original post by fortysixandtwo)
    If the profession benefits surely the public benefit as a result, no?
    Not really, what is good for the profession is maintaining high wages, shortage of NHS time presenting good private opportunities, choices in terms of careers (not the current lottery), and the BMA maintaining a suitably strong position to keep the politicians at arms length. To do this a shortage of doctors is useful.

    What is good for the population is to get best possible healthcare, which unless we obtain an infinite budget means we have to try to keep wages down, numbers of doctors up, and people trapped in the system by a cunningly made training system.
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    (Original post by terpineol)
    Not really, what is good for the profession is maintaining high wages, shortage of NHS time presenting good private opportunities, choices in terms of careers (not the current lottery), and the BMA maintaining a suitably strong position to keep the politicians at arms length. To do this a shortage of doctors is useful.

    What is good for the population is to get best possible healthcare, which unless we obtain an infinite budget means we have to try to keep wages down, numbers of doctors up, and people trapped in the system by a cunningly made training system.
    I see what you're saying though I'm fairly sure that GEP courses don't have a massive impact on the increase in doctors. Maybe I've missed your point.
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    (Original post by fortysixandtwo)
    I see what you're saying though I'm fairly sure that GEP courses don't have a massive impact on the increase in doctors. Maybe I've missed your point.
    GEP courses are part of a massive increase in medical school places within the UK, they are by no means the devil incarnate, but part of the problem. Increasing access to medicine is in part simply a vote winning way of saying 'lets put lots more people through medical school', allowing for medicine to become a less attractive path to those who once made up the bulk of applicants (and at present still do) decide to do other things.

    Or that at least is my feeling on the whole affair. Though I don't feel I have put it in a particularly articulate manner there.
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    Would love to know how much GEP courses do contribute to the increase in the number of medical school places. Surely there are only finite resources to train doctors and the increase in places cannot continue, especially with higher education budget cuts coming in.

    I know Georges is increasing its number of GEP places next year, but will be decreasing the number of places on the 5 year course, so no net increase in number of places. Maybe that will be the way other med schools will go too.
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    (Original post by JammyP)
    Would love to know how much GEP courses do contribute to the increase in the number of medical school places. Surely there are only finite resources to train doctors and the increase in places cannot continue, especially with higher education budget cuts coming in.

    I know Georges is increasing its number of GEP places next year, but will be decreasing the number of places on the 5 year course, so no net increase in number of places. Maybe that will be the way other med schools will go too.
    I think we are adding roughly 100 or so to the years here from next year.
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    Are the GEP courses have the same number of students as the normal courses?
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    (Original post by Nutta!)
    Are the GEP courses have the same number of students as the normal courses?
    No, they're very small in comparison. Newcastle, for example, have an intake of approx 30-35.

    (Original post by JammyP)
    Would love to know how much GEP courses do contribute to the increase in the number of medical school places. Surely there are only finite resources to train doctors and the increase in places cannot continue, especially with higher education budget cuts coming in.

    I know Georges is increasing its number of GEP places next year, but will be decreasing the number of places on the 5 year course, so no net increase in number of places. Maybe that will be the way other med schools will go too.
    Haven't most medical schools increased their undergrad intake quite a bit?

    I reckon this is where the big increases are coming from.
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    I believe that GEP is a better idea then the 5yr course.

    A close member of my family works for a medschool as a teacher and she said that med schools, well the one she is at anyway, loves the GEM students. she said over all they are more focused, there is a lower drop out rate (because they know what to expect from uni), they are more mature (no teenage tantrums) and they are so much eaisier to work with.
    she raves about her mature GEM students.

    this makes you think that the original reason for setting up GEM (to widen access) has now changed in the universities eyes and the GEM places are rising because GEM medics are generally better for the school.
    like JAMMY said above.

    please note: med school still love there 5yr students you are all awsome. the above is more about the reasons why GEM is a good idea than who is the best or worst.
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    I think GEM courses are a great idea (though maybe a little biased given that I am an applicant). They were first introduced not just to give a wider access but to meet the needs of highly qualified doctors in this country.

    Going to interviews, I love the fact that applicants come from all walks of life and that they can bring so much more to the profession as a whole. I guess that's why it's extremely competitive, those who do apply know that for sure that this is what they want to do in the long run.

    I think GEM + 5 yr courses in whole makes the medical field far more diverse and interesting. Totally love it :yes:
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    GEM is competetive because there are only few places on each course compared to 5 year courses not because more apply, surly.
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    I think this year there has been a big increase in the number of applications to GEM courses. I assume this is partly due to the recession so this year it's going to be even more competitive
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    (Original post by Beula24)
    I think this year there has been a big increase in the number of applications to GEM courses. I assume this is partly due to the recession so this year it's going to be even more competitive
    Yeah I heard that was the case too. I like the competition though :o:
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    (Original post by fortysixandtwo)
    Yeah I heard that was the case too. I like the competition though :o:
    Competition is good
 
 
 

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