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    (Original post by JakeF)

    If you want IB, and you want to do Economics/Finance/Engineering, just please make sure its a BSc and not a BA.. the maths element of any analytical degree like that is vital for IB.

    Just my 2p.
    Ppl need to distinguish more between diff departments when talking about maths requirements.

    For IBD + BO + some parts of S&T there is no need for BSc maths, and even a BA Econ will have a lot of maths that will have no use.

    For other parts of S&T, it is a whole different ball game though.
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    (Original post by JoeCarp)
    Ppl need to distinguish more between diff departments when talking about maths requirements.

    For IBD + BO + some parts of S&T there is no need for BSc maths, and even a BA Econ will have a lot of maths that will have no use.

    For other parts of S&T, it is a whole different ball game though.
    But who would want to work in BO? Surely then someone would strive to get a degree with a mathematical element in a bid to make them look clever? A Mathematical degree like BSc Economics still contains enough analytical skills so is the perfect mix IMO
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    (Original post by hamzab)
    But who would want to work in BO? Surely then someone would strive to get a degree with a mathematical element in a bid to make them look clever? A Mathematical degree like BSc Economics still contains enough analytical skills so is the perfect mix IMO

    Incredibly naive thing to say, especially the bold bit. Coming from someone who is not doing a full Maths A-Level.
    You really should not berate BO like that -- while most people here seem to have the FO bug, it is an absolutely necessary function of an investment bank and there is interesting work done there.
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    (Original post by onthecoast)
    Incredibly naive thing to say, especially the bold bit. Coming from someone who is not doing a full Maths A-Level.
    You really should not berate BO like that -- while most people here seem to have the FO bug, it is an absolutely necessary function of an investment bank and there is interesting work done there.
    Ok but if I had the choice before hand to maximise my poetential by applying for a degree which made me look clever then would I not want to rather work in FO rather than BO.

    Maybe I am being Naive, but so far on here all I have heard about BO is crap, as in no one makes it from there etc. Please enlighten me if I'm wrong.
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    (Original post by hamzab)
    Maybe I am being Naive, but so far on here all I have heard about BO is crap, as in no one makes it from there etc. Please enlighten me if I'm wrong.
    That's because a lot of people on this board are megalomaniacs with delusions of grandeur. They believe all FO roles will bring riches and glory to all when in fact, very few will actually be raking in millions.

    As for the part I highlighted in bold, it is all to do with what you mean by making it. BO people can be highly successful and influential people where they work...
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    (Original post by hamzab)
    But who would want to work in BO? Surely then someone would strive to get a degree with a mathematical element in a bid to make them look clever? A Mathematical degree like BSc Economics still contains enough analytical skills so is the perfect mix IMO
    Not getting the point at all i see. I was resonding to JakeF's assmption that the maths is a BSc is "vital to IB", which it really isnt in a lot of roles, including IBD and BO.

    The advantage of a BSc Econ over a BA Econ for these roles is not large enough to label it as necessary.
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    (Original post by JoeCarp)
    Not getting the point at all i see. I was resonding to JakeF's assmption that the maths is a BSc is "vital to IB", which it really isnt in a lot of roles, including IBD and BO.

    The advantage of a BSc Econ over a BA Econ for these roles is not large enough to label it as necessary.
    BO is not investment banking, it is merely within an investment bank.
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    (Original post by PorcineAviation)
    BO is not investment banking, it is merely within an investment bank.
    In that case S&T is not investment banking either technically, it is merely within an investment bank. Therefore under your definitions, there is even less need for higher level maths than under the general IB definition.

    In either case, IBD is FO and doesnt require any maths beyond GCSEs/Alevels. Not sure how this brought about all this unnecessary back office bashing.
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    (Original post by JoeCarp)
    In that case S&T is not investment banking either technically, it is merely within an investment bank. Therefore under your definitions, there is even less need for higher level maths than under the general IB definition.

    In either case, IBD is FO and doesnt require any maths beyond GCSEs/Alevels. Not sure how this brought about all this unnecessary back office bashing.
    Was just helping you to understand the terminology.

    I'm not sure BO bashing is ever unnecessary.
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    (Original post by PorcineAviation)
    BO is not investment banking, it is merely within an investment bank.
    Of course, it is highly unlikely im going to use Lagrangian multipliers and differentiation too much in a FO office or IBD role! But i believe on the whole a BSc will set you in a better mindframe than a BA when it comes to working in such a mathematical and number orientated environment.

    But i think we're getting away from the point here. The ability to have a mathematical and analytical brain is one that is viewed in high regard by many IBs irregardless of the content of the maths you do at undergrad level. Its the very fact the degree included such an element that is important. Or so i believe.

    As for this argument around BO and MO. Both are pretty integral parts to any IB. Just because they dont happen to be revenue generating parts does not mean they are useless. FO guys would be up **** creek if it wasnt for IT guys sometimes..

    Besides, from what ive heard, spend a few years in MO Risk, understand the ins and outs of Risk Management.. perfect basis for a transition to trading.
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    (Original post by JakeF)
    Of course, it is highly unlikely im going to use Lagrangian multipliers and differentiation too much in a FO office or IBD role! But i believe on the whole a BSc will set you in a better mindframe than a BA when it comes to working in such a mathematical and number orientated environment.

    But i think we're getting away from the point here. The ability to have a mathematical and analytical brain is one that is viewed in high regard by many IBs irregardless of the content of the maths you do at undergrad level. Its the very fact the degree included such an element that is important. Or so i believe.

    As for this argument around BO and MO. Both are pretty integral parts to any IB. Just because they dont happen to be revenue generating parts does not mean they are useless. FO guys would be up **** creek if it wasnt for IT guys sometimes..

    Besides, from what ive heard, spend a few years in MO Risk, understand the ins and outs of Risk Management.. perfect basis for a transition to trading.
    Def agree it could give u a slight leg up in recruiting (altho havent had any trouble with a BA Econ for S&T), just wanted to make sure the myth that all of IB is highly quantitative does not spread.

    Most of the idiots on TSR do not get it that for some people BO/MO is a better path in the sense that it is lower risk and a better lifestyle (albeit lower reward). That is because every person who goes into trading thinks they will be BSD's by 30, whereas it is much more likely that they will be let go for being mediocre.
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    (Original post by JakeF)
    Of course, it is highly unlikely im going to use Lagrangian multipliers and differentiation too much in a FO office or IBD role!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greeks_%28finance%29

    Differentiation makes the world go round.

    I'm not implying that you're going to sit there at desk with a pencil and do maths, but it is at the bottom of most things.
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    as someone who is doing an Econ BA i wouldn't say it matters too much. Didn't have too mch problems securing FO internships and a spring week in a rather numerical role (rates research). My interviwer then even said i'd do great in trading, eventho i told him how much maths my course has (and there is some in it, and in economics you do need formulas and models no matter what). Said unless you're a quant you won't need more than A-levle maths anyway.

    and to add more to the anecdotes, a friend of mine who also did an Econ BA here, due to lack of sufficient hgih school maths, ended up interning in risk and analytics at blackrock and is interviewing for an HF...

    so its not all about whether you have 2 mathsy modules more or not (and from what i know, thats pretty much the difference between a BA and BSc here)
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    Loughborough has got me interviews at UBS, GS, MS, Accenture, ICAP, BNP-P for internships. After 20 applications I have had only one straight rejection and thats from JPM, but I know of people from Lough getting interviews there as well. My apps were hedged between S&T/Risk/Finance, and MC with accenture just for the interview experience.

    I don't think Durham offers any significant advantage in careers. It has a marginally better reputation, but isn't really one of the "main" universities for banking like Warwick/UCL etc.

    Don't place to much emphasis on which university you go to. Just be proactive with networking and building EC's.
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    (Original post by Damarus)
    Loughborough has got me interviews at UBS, GS, MS, Accenture, ICAP, BNP-P for internships. After 20 applications I have had only one straight rejection and thats from JPM, but I know of people from Lough getting interviews there as well.

    I don't think Durham offers any significant advantage in careers. It has a marginally better reputation, but isn't really one of the "main" universities for banking like Warwick/UCL etc.
    Loughborough didn't get you that... YOU got that. I'd say apart from Oxbridge, LSE, Imperial, Warwick and UCL no university helps get an interview -- even at these places, it's anything but guaranteed.

    Congrats on your success! It does show that you need not go to a top 5 school to make it.

    Even though like you say, Durham has a marginally better reputation, there are also more people wanting to get into IB, hence stronger competition.

    At somewhere like Loughborough, you can probably make more opportunities for yourself, and enjoy your university experience way more (I'd kill myself if I had to live in Stockton). While I appreciate Durham may have a better name, I'd go to Loughborough in a heartbeat if I were to study anything business/finance-y. Obviously if I were to study economics or sciences, Durham is clearly a no-brainer.
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    (Original post by onthecoast)
    That's because a lot of people on this board are megalomaniacs with delusions of grandeur. They believe all FO roles will bring riches and glory to all when in fact, very few will actually be raking in millions.


    As for the part I highlighted in bold, it is all to do with what you mean by making it. BO people can be highly successful and influential people where they work...
    Very true. Especially now there are going to be trading caps and further "shoot the banker" regulation. The glory days are dead.
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    (Original post by Damarus)
    Loughborough has got me interviews at UBS, GS, MS, Accenture, ICAP, BNP-P for internships. After 20 applications I have had only one straight rejection and thats from JPM, but I know of people from Lough getting interviews there as well. My apps were hedged between S&T/Risk/Finance, and MC with accenture just for the interview experience.

    I don't think Durham offers any significant advantage in careers. It has a marginally better reputation, but isn't really one of the "main" universities for banking like Warwick/UCL etc.

    Don't place to much emphasis on which university you go to. Just be proactive with networking and building EC's.

    May I ask what course you studied at Loughborough?
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    BSc Economics.

    One thing to bare in mind is that the majority of my fellow course mates are not obsessed or care about IB. That’s the reason why you won't find a large number at AC's etc. All the major banks hold presentations here and the people who have wanted an internship always get one, but the majority is genuinely not interested. Also the University is quite small and has 1/3 of the amount of undergraduate students compared to UCL/Bristol etc.
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    (Original post by Damarus)
    BSc Economics.

    One thing to bare in mind is that the majority of my fellow course mates are not obsessed or care about IB. That’s the reason why you won't find a large number at AC's etc. All the major banks hold presentations here and the people who have wanted an internship always get one, but the majority is genuinely not interested. Also the University is quite small and has 1/3 of the amount of undergraduate students compared to UCL/Bristol etc.
    You're quite far off in regards to student numbers. Both Loughborough and UCL are of equal size in terms of undergraduates (11,055 and 11,970 respectively), and Bristol only has 4,000 more students than Loughborough (in other words Loughborough has 72% as many students).

    That in no way is the same as Loughborough having 1/3 of the amount of students.
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    My mistake.
 
 
 
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