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    Lol
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    (Original post by Double Agent)
    War
    definatly weird, we are humans and we choose to fight against ourselves, i think its because we have driven so many animals to extinction and we still want to fight. what do u think?
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    (Original post by KazJ)
    definatly weird, we are humans and we choose to fight against ourselves, i think its because we have driven so many animals to extinction and we still want to fight. what do u think?
    I will definitely tell my kids that Santa is real. Simply because of the feeling I remember having on Xmas eve, simply because of Santa. It didn't make me behave any better or worse - my parents raised me well enough that they didn't have to emotionally blackmail me to make me behave myself. Seeing the sherry half drunk and the cookie crumbs on the plate is a feeling I definitely want to pass on to my kids. The half belief of religion - which I see as a morbid and scary fairytale - is one I will not.
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    sorry I replied to the wrong post lol.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    If I was to ever have kids (I won't but...) I would not allow them to believe in Santa Claus. I don't understand how any parent thought that was a good idea- the children don't REALLY behave well as a consequence, think the fact that they don't get as nice presents as the other kids is because Santa hates them, and the children feel no gratitude to their parents for all those awesome presents.
    Although I see your point, my parents managed to get gratitude from me by saying that they got me presents everyday of the year
    I just think that christmas and santa is such an exciting part of growing up! Admit it: Christmas is nowhere near exciting now you know the truth!? :yes:

    (Original post by Steezy)
    I will definitely tell my kids that Santa is real. Simply because of the feeling I remember having on Xmas eve, simply because of Santa. Seeing the sherry half drunk and the cookie crumbs on the plate is a feeling I definitely want to pass on to my kids.
    AHHHH. that feeling! love it!
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    (Original post by lucefowls)
    oh, so you'll ridicule all the millions of kids around the world who believe in santa claus then.
    Eh, when I was 7-14 I did ridicule them. Now I'm older, I see that they're simply indoctrinated by lies told to them by their parents, and that their young, naive and trusting minds are just soaking it all up like a sponge. So instead of ridiculing them, I ridicule their parents.

    Adults, however, have no excuse for being young, naive and not being skeptical. They are morons.
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    (Original post by Phugoid)
    .
    I'm not going to lie, I've completely forgotten where this discussion was going.
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    (Original post by Steezy)
    I will definitely tell my kids that Santa is real. Simply because of the feeling I remember having on Xmas eve, simply because of Santa. It didn't make me behave any better or worse - my parents raised me well enough that they didn't have to emotionally blackmail me to make me behave myself. Seeing the sherry half drunk and the cookie crumbs on the plate is a feeling I definitely want to pass on to my kids. The half belief of religion - which I see as a morbid and scary fairytale - is one I will not.
    I found out Santa wasn't real when I was 7, and that didn't stop me from feeling that 'feeling' each Christmas up until I was around 12-14. My wonder at Christmas didn't end when I found out Santa wasn't real, it ended when I hit puberty.

    I still get that same feeling, btw. But not from Christmas. I get that feelings of wonder and amazement when I get lost in the Ultra Deep Field. I get it when I view the moon with a high-detail telescope. I get it when I see images of galaxies from afar. I get it when I see real science showing me the beauty of nature in a lab. I get it when I see people's eyes light up when I tell them something interesting about the real world. I get it when I get told something interesting about the real world.

    My children will get that feeling from the real, natural world - not some lie-filled NONSENSE shoved down their throat as fact.

    Now, there's nothing wrong with children having an imagination. I wouldn't tell my child to stop playing with his Batman figures because they're not actually Batman. Imagination is a wonderful, beautiful thing ... but... you don't actually need to BELIEVE your imagination to enjoy it. Almost every night I read, and quite often I read fictional novels. Obviously, I know none of what is being said actually happened, but I let my imagination wonder, and enjoy it fully. The same is true of childhood. I never believed my batman figurines were actually batman. I never believed I could fly. I never believed that my carpet was hot magma, and that my couches were rocks on which to leap. But that didn't stop me enjoying it.

    The difference between all of these things, and Santa, is that a child is actually made to believe that Santa exists. They are not asked to imagine he exists. They are not asked to pretend he exists. They are not asked to engage with their imagination. They are simply TOLD something that quite simply isn't true, and as a parent who should want their child to be a lover of reality, and an intellectual mind, that is a travesty. To turn to your own child, and tell them a lie, is the worst thing I could imagine I could do to my child.

    You are despicable, sir.
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    (Original post by Phugoid)

    The difference between all of these things, and Santa, is that a child is actually made to believe that Santa exists. They are not asked to imagine he exists. They are not asked to pretend he exists. They are not asked to engage with their imagination. They are simply TOLD something that quite simply isn't true, and as a parent who should want their child to be a lover of reality, and an intellectual mind, that is a travesty. To turn to your own child, and tell them a lie, is the worst thing I could imagine I could do to my child.
    But its fun when you "believe." And even when you do find out, its not something where you feel "oh, so my childhood's been a complete lie. I hate my parents for telling me these lies." Well, for me it wasnt, at least.

    Anyway, I know that comment wasnt sent to me, sorry!
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    (Original post by Phugoid)
    I found out Santa wasn't real when I was 7, and that didn't stop me from feeling that 'feeling' each Christmas up until I was around 12-14. My wonder at Christmas didn't end when I found out Santa wasn't real, it ended when I hit puberty.

    I still get that same feeling, btw. But not from Christmas. I get that feelings of wonder and amazement when I get lost in the Ultra Deep Field. I get it when I view the moon with a high-detail telescope. I get it when I see images of galaxies from afar. I get it when I see real science showing me the beauty of nature in a lab. I get it when I see people's eyes light up when I tell them something interesting about the real world. I get it when I get told something interesting about the real world.

    My children will get that feeling from the real, natural world - not some lie-filled NONSENSE shoved down their throat as fact.

    Now, there's nothing wrong with children having an imagination. I wouldn't tell my child to stop playing with his Batman figures because they're not actually Batman. Imagination is a wonderful, beautiful thing ... but... you don't actually need to BELIEVE your imagination to enjoy it. Almost every night I read, and quite often I read fictional novels. Obviously, I know none of what is being said actually happened, but I let my imagination wonder, and enjoy it fully. The same is true of childhood. I never believed my batman figurines were actually batman. I never believed I could fly. I never believed that my carpet was hot magma, and that my couches were rocks on which to leap. But that didn't stop me enjoying it.

    The difference between all of these things, and Santa, is that a child is actually made to believe that Santa exists. They are not asked to imagine he exists. They are not asked to pretend he exists. They are not asked to engage with their imagination. They are simply TOLD something that quite simply isn't true, and as a parent who should want their child to be a lover of reality, and an intellectual mind, that is a travesty. To turn to your own child, and tell them a lie, is the worst thing I could imagine I could do to my child.

    You are despicable, sir.

    LOL - "I am dispicable, sir"? HAHAHAHA Mate, chill out a bit. Ohhhh, parents lying to children - the horror! The injustice!

    I am science through & through. I believe what I can see, touch and hear. The fact that I used to believe in Santa & will tell my kids about santa does not make me dispicable, sir. The fact that you have a problem with what I'll tell my kids makes you a moraliser. Now that's dispicable, sir.
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    Anyway, this isn't a thread for debating whether we should tell our kids about Santa Claus or not. OR a debate about religion.

    Please chill out a bit and/or create a thread to give your little moan about your own topics. This is a light hearted thread about strange things we see as weird. To mention religion & Santa Claus is fine, but please now give it a rest!
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    Wanting to have piercings in weird areas. u know the areas im talking about, i think thats rather weird haha
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    Just to be pedantic with the OP, but cow's milk doesn't come from its stomach! It's like with humans - breastmilk comes from the mammary glands, not from the stomach...
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    (Original post by FormerlyHistoryStudent)
    Just to be pedantic with the OP, but cow's milk doesn't come from its stomach! It's like with humans - breastmilk comes from the mammary glands, not from the stomach...

    I've been told that about 20 times now. But thanks anyway!
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    (Original post by bikipip)
    Kissing - I sometimes wonder whether my urge to kiss someone that I like is instinctive or whether the media and society has influenced this behavior. :kissing2: :kiss2:

    Completely agree! Watch two people kissing as if it's the first time you've ever seen it.... Very strange behaviour!
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    (Original post by Steezy)
    I've been told that about 20 times now. But thanks anyway!
    Oh sorry! :o:

    If you go back and edit it, you won't get any more people doing it
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    (Original post by FormerlyHistoryStudent)
    Oh sorry! :o:

    If you go back and edit it, you won't get any more people doing it
    Lol, no worries. Have done now! (With a hint of sarcasm)
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    (Original post by Steezy)
    Have done now! (With a hint of sarcasm)


    :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by FormerlyHistoryStudent)


    :getmecoat:
    Lol, couldn't help myself
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    (Original post by Steezy)
    Lol, couldn't help myself
    That's OK
 
 
 
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