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    What's the best masters if one wants to do research in the area of medicine? (research like in understanding the molecular basis of disease)

    I'm considering molecular medicine, biomedicine or biomedical sciences research. The name "molecular medicine" really appeals to me but the programs don't seem that much different from each other... Is there a more suitable one?
    And how important is the university in which you do the course? Does it influence your future work perspectives?

    Thks for any help! =)
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    You really should pick something that appeals to you , research is no walk in the park.Unless your doing something about parks then it may invole walking in parks...
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    Do you have any preference in which field you want to work in?
    molecular medicine is rather different to biomedicine, not only in content, but more importantly...techniques!

    Especially if you are considering a phd afterwards, in which case, definately choose something in a field you are interested in.
    Are you planning on going into medical school afterwards?
    - if No, then i think you'll get more advice from the Phd/post-grad forum, rather than here in the medical school section.
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    (Original post by McDull)
    Do you have any preference in which field you want to work in?
    molecular medicine is rather different to biomedicine, not only in content, but more importantly...techniques!
    What do you mean by different techniques? is the kind of research done very different?

    I did a work on stem cells last year and really got interested in that field. I also like immunology and cancer but never studied it in detail though... i'd like to do a masters that could introduce me to various areas in which i might work and also one in which I could learn research techniques.
    I don't want to go to medical school afterwards but i'm definitely considering a phd.
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    (Original post by reikazen)
    You really should pick something that appeals to you , research is no walk in the park.Unless your doing something about parks then it may invole walking in parks...

    This is so not funny, infact, I'm spitting at the screen right now.:mad:
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    (Original post by i.s.a.)
    What do you mean by different techniques? is the kind of research done very different?

    I did a work on stem cells last year and really got interested in that field. I also like immunology and cancer but never studied it in detail though... i'd like to do a masters that could introduce me to various areas in which i might work and also one in which I could learn research techniques.
    I don't want to go to medical school afterwards but i'm definitely considering a phd.
    well heres from my own experience.

    i did a degree in biochemistry, and my dissertation was in alzheimeir's disease, and to be honest, the only technique i utilised was at western blotting and some bioinformatics. So apart from western blotting, i know the principles of other techniques (from studying my bsc) but never had a go at them.

    This was a bit of a problem when it came to phd applications. Whilst applying for medical school i was a bit hmm lets apply for phds too, so off i went applying for a few phds. The only field i was interested in was protein folding.... so i applied and had an interview at oxford which more or less went down the drain. I had no relevent techniques, and the other applicants there had masters which were not only relevent, but actually involved the techniques they would be using. I knew how nmr works, but i can stand in front of one, and not know how to operate it.

    It really depends on the phd you apply for too, some supervisors may be more leniant and willing to teach you, but if you want to improve your chances, i think having at least some relevent techniques and course in the right field of study will be beneficial. I don't think its compulsary (unless stated in the phd application, which some do), but it would be good if you did.

    and "is the kind of research done very different" .. well you will have to look at the prospectus, it will vary from uni to uni, course to course. Where i did my undergraduate degree, molecular medicine and biomedicine was very different. Molecular medicine was more or less very similar to biochemistry, and biomedicine was very much like physiology, it just depends where you apply.
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    (Original post by Orihime)
    This is so not funny, infact, I'm spitting at the screen right now.:mad:
    thats just disgusting..
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    the best Masters was James Marsters from Buffy.

    After that, John Sims as the Master in Doctor Whooiee was a tour de force in villainousness.
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    Hanaesthetics
 
 
 
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