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Speculation on why black states are not successful.... watch

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    (Original post by AliciaJ703)
    I'll listen to what you have to say when you have a degree.
    LOL! WTF?
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    certainly not condoning slavery - but we did introduce them to the modern world. Surely if they had not been colonised they would still be where we were 1500 years ago?

    And also....they could sort themselves out if the governments weren't such corrupt *******s...
    If you're open, I can recommend some books for you so you can confirm or change your opinion on the topic.
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    Guessing by "black states", you mean "sub saharan africa"..? In which case, maybe colonisation (carving up 1000s of different tribes and societies into defined countries, including some landlocked ones with no easy ways of trading), decolonisation (and the subsequent coups and civil wars over who controls what), corruption, geography (it's hot), diseases (aids, malaria), unfair trade (Common Agricultural Policy), etc etc etc
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    Nah, the reason why it's still as it is is because of corruption. God I love corruption, tis the reason why I exist in england today, whilst my nigerian brother is probably running after cars selling stuff!

    Corruption rocks, 0.001% of the countries population having 99.9% of its wealth FTW!!
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    Poor leadership. There isn't a government in Africa that isn't corrupt to the core. International aid goes to buying their presidents new Bentleys.
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    certainly not condoning slavery - but we did introduce them to the modern world. Surely if they had not been colonised they would still be where we were 1500 years ago?

    And also....they could sort themselves out if the governments weren't such corrupt *******s...
    The thing about govnt being *******s = true.
    But I think we got to this stage because of them tbh :o: without their oil and other resources I don't think west could have gotten as far as they are now.
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    What about India or Brazil?
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    (Original post by licensedX)
    Do not call me racist. I am certainly not, it is not racist to dicuss facts of life.

    My theory....it took many many hundreds of years for western civilization to evolve into what it is now. We went through the stone age then into the slow process of becoming successful states. However, when African states were first discovered...relatively recently...the west literally yanked them right out of what was a prolonged stone age for them(something we went through thousands of years ago)...they had no modern knowledge, none of the capabilities the west had - and therefore, if it took us thousands of years to develop from being in this state, why do we expect African countries to break out of it in one hundred years? They are still in that developmental stage.....but it's just a theory.
    There is also evidence of recent acceleration of genetic change, over the past 10,000 or so years. Geoffrey Miller in the Economist recently noted that soon a number of these will be better identified:

    We will also identify the many genes that create physical and mental differences across populations, and we will be able to estimate when those genes arose. Some of those differences probably occurred very recently, within recorded history. Gregory Cochran and Henry Harpending argued in "The 10,000 Year Explosion" that some human groups experienced a vastly accelerated rate of evolutionary change within the past few thousand years, benefiting from the new genetic diversity created within far larger populations, and in response to the new survival, social and reproductive challenges of agriculture, cities, divisions of labour and social classes. Others did not experience these changes until the past few hundred years when they were subject to contact, colonisation and, all too often, extermination.

    If the shift from GWAS to sequencing studies finds evidence of such politically awkward and morally perplexing facts, we can expect the usual range of ideological reactions, including nationalistic retro-racism from conservatives and outraged denial from blank-slate liberals. The few who really understand the genetics will gain a more enlightened, live-and-let-live recognition of the biodiversity within our extraordinary species-including a clearer view of likely comparative advantages between the world's different economies."
    http://www.economist.com/displaystor...ry_id=14742737

    A few years ago in the NY Times one relating to cognition was identified but the controversy lead to the Chinese author stepping away from the research for a while.

    Last year, Dr. Lahn, one of a select group of researchers supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, showed that a group of 20 brain-associated genes, including microcephalin and ASPM, had evolved faster in the great ape lineage than in mice and rats. He concluded that these genes might have had important roles in human evolution. As part of this study, he noticed that microcephalin and ASPM had an unusual pattern of alleles. With each gene, one allele was much more common than all the others. He and his colleagues have now studied the worldwide distribution of the alleles by decoding the DNA of the two genes in many different populations.

    They report that with microcephalin, a new allele arose about 37,000 years ago, although it could have appeared as early as 60,000 or as late as 14,000 years ago. About 70 percent of people in most European and East Asian populations carry this allele of the gene, but it is much rarer in most sub-Saharan Africans.
    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpag...=&pagewanted=2

    This could be a factor in differences in country wealth, as a lot of research shows the importance of a 'smart fraction' to macroeconomic and social development.

    'The impact of smart fractions, cognitive ability of politicians and average competence of peoples on social development' Rindermann et al Talent Development & Excellence
    Vol. 1, No. 1, 2009, 3-25

    http://iratde.org/issues/1-2009/tde_...mann_et_al.pdf
 
 
 
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