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    Yeah the first one was definitely 96N and the very last one was 3 m/s, for sure. Looks like the majority of people found it really difficult, meaning the grade boundaries will be quite low, I guess it'll be 28 or 29 for an A*.
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    (Original post by wludeen)
    it was relatively easy.
    the only ones that were hard were about the scientists being respected and listened to.
    i got 3.75 for the last one, what did everyone else get.

    for the one about the Van De Graph i write that the guy picks up a charge and his hair stand up because his hair and his body have the same charge so they repel.
    i'm sort of glad that you got 3.75 for the last question because that's what i got. but i'm sort of confused because i've got this maths genius in my year who also took the paper and he says he doesn't remember the answer he put down but he knows it's a whole number.
    in his maths class, he literally does a-level work while the others in the same class just do GCSE stuff.
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    The last question was 3 m/s for sure, was the journal and newspaper question 1 mark?
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    somebody please tell me they got 3.75 m/s for the very last question. some of you got 3m/s.
    and what the hell is the deal with those iffy science magazine questions and if people would believe stories if it's a scientific journal rather than a newspaper. this is physics!
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    what about the drawing the graph one. i drew a similar one to the one already printed on the page but instead going upwards. am i right? because as resisitance increases, it then allows more voltage to go through. that's right isn't it? but i'm not sure if i gave the axis a correct scale.
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    (Original post by qasidb)
    somebody please tell me they got 3.75 m/s for the very last question. some of you got 3m/s.
    and what the hell is the deal with those iffy science magazine questions and if people would believe stories if it's a scientific journal rather than a newspaper. this is physics!
    The answer is 3 m/s, its been proven and thats just the right answer. And I know they were so damn annoying, its like opinion based, nothing to do with Physics!
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    (Original post by qasidb)
    what about the drawing the graph one. i drew a similar one to the one already printed on the page but instead going upwards. am i right? because as resisitance increases, it then allows more voltage to go through. that's right isn't it? but i'm not sure if i gave the axis a correct scale.
    Nope, it was going downwards, high current = low resistance, and high current = low voltage, so the graphs are proportional, going downwards
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    (Original post by Marc707)
    Yeah the first one was definitely 96N and the very last one was 3 m/s, for sure. Looks like the majority of people found it really difficult, meaning the grade boundaries will be quite low, I guess it'll be 28 or 29 for an A*.
    Yeah it looks like it, most people found it beast, so we are looking at about 28-30 for A* :cool:
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    i'm getting really scared, well, not scared but you know what i mean. but anyway, what happened is that when there was the question about what is nuclear fusion. i thought i knew the answer. but i wrote down, "it's when two particles collide to make a new particle. in the case if of stars, two hydrogen nuclei collide to produce one helium nucleus". will i still get the 2 marks because in the first part of my answer, i was just talking about particles, not nuclei. I've realised now what an idiot i've been to not mention nuclei in the first part of my answer. but hopefully, at least the last part of my answer was right wasn't it? when i said two hydrogen nuclei collide to produce one helium nucleus. please tell me that's right.
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    (Original post by adil12)
    Nope, it was going downwards, high current = low resistance, and high current = low voltage, so the graphs are proportional, going downwards
    i don't get that though, because if you look at a current against voltage graph, the current is proptional to the voltage, so therefore, in terms of the exam question, wouldn't the line go upwards?
    also, if the current against voltage graphs were disproportinate to eachother, they would go downwarrds which would then make sense to draw a line downwards on the graph of that question.
    but current and voltage ARE NOT disproportinate to eachother so you DON'T draw a downwards line. you draw an upwards line.

    i probably got a maximum of an A. minimum of a B. but if grade boundaries are low i really hope i get an A*.
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    alislam.org
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    (Original post by qasidb)
    i don't get that though, because if you look at a current against voltage graph, the current is proptional to the voltage, so therefore, in terms of the exam question, wouldn't the line go upwards?
    also, if the current against voltage graphs were disproportinate to eachother, they would go downwarrds which would then make sense to draw a line downwards on the graph of that question.
    but current and voltage ARE NOT disproportinate to eachother so you DON'T draw a downwards line. you draw an upwards line.

    i probably got a maximum of an A. minimum of a B. but if grade boundaries are low i really hope i get an A*.
    Nope, it goes downwards, for the graph provided, it was the light intensity against the resistance. The current was a constant (0.0002 A) as the circuit was connected in series, and from this you could identify the voltage values for the second graph, by substituting it into Ohm's law. Once identifying the values, the voltage matched the same trend as the resistance, which could be worked out alternatively by common sense. Hence, the graph is downwards, as Voltage went downwards
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    Yep, you're right. As light intensity increases, resistance decreases. I read in my revision guide (I think it was that... it was something anyway!) that LDR resistors are used for this reason for things like safety devices in cars, houses etc. Because bad things happen at night lol!

    I think it was relatively easy to be honest. It wasn't simple, but it was of a similar difficulty to previous papers which I didn't think were hard.
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    i'm getting really scared, well, not scared but you know what i mean. but anyway, what happened is that when there was the question about what is nuclear fusion. i thought i knew the answer. but i wrote down, "it's when two particles collide to make a new particle. in the case if of stars, two hydrogen nuclei collide to produce one helium nucleus". will i still get the 2 marks because in the first part of my answer, i was just talking about particles, not nuclei. I've realised now what an idiot i've been to not mention nuclei in the first part of my answer. but hopefully, at least the last part of my answer was right wasn't it? when i said two hydrogen nuclei collide to produce one helium nucleus. please tell me that's right.
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    WHat was the answet to the 50% increse question??? I got 66.6 but people got 37.5??
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    It was 37.5 for sure
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    (Original post by qasidb)
    i'm getting really scared, well, not scared but you know what i mean. but anyway, what happened is that when there was the question about what is nuclear fusion. i thought i knew the answer. but i wrote down, "it's when two particles collide to make a new particle. in the case if of stars, two hydrogen nuclei collide to produce one helium nucleus". will i still get the 2 marks because in the first part of my answer, i was just talking about particles, not nuclei. I've realised now what an idiot i've been to not mention nuclei in the first part of my answer. but hopefully, at least the last part of my answer was right wasn't it? when i said two hydrogen nuclei collide to produce one helium nucleus. please tell me that's right.
    Nuclear fusion is the joining of two atomic nuclei to produce a larger one, thats all thats need to say, no need to go into the hydrogen explanation, but you could say it. You said "particles" which is incorrect, you refer to them as "nuclei" so the answer is hard to read
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    how did people get 3 m/s?

    i somehow got 10 m/s

    can some someone please explain?
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    (Original post by M.R.B)
    how did people get 3 m/s?

    i somehow got 10 m/s

    can some someone please explain?
    The total momentum before = The total momentum after.

    Momentum before = 12000 kg/ms, the car had a mass of 1200 kg travelling at a speed of 2 m/s, so its momentum is 2400 kg m/s, 12000-2400 = 9600 kg m/s, the mass of the truck was 3200 kg, so substitute that into the equation, 9600/3200 = 3 m/s which is the answer
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    @adil12 thanks for the explanation. This paper was difficult. I hope I did alright.
 
 
 
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