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Power Assisted Steering watch

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    What is the difference between power steering and power assisted steering? My brother is trying to sell me a car at the moment but I have only ever driven power steering and it will be my first car after passing my test so I'm really not sure...
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    (Original post by Biggsx)
    What is the difference between power steering and power assisted steering? My brother is trying to sell me a car at the moment but I have only ever driven power steering and it will be my first car after passing my test so I'm really not sure...
    The correct term is power-assisted steering, but many people say power steering instead. That is all; there is no difference.
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    I disagree, Power Assisted Steering is what you find in cars, the car gives you a hand when you turn by using hydraulics or electric motors. Though when it cuts out you can still turn.

    Power Steering is what you find is trucks and some other heavy vehicles. When that bad boy cuts out your not steering the truck any more, it would be to damn heavy.
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    (Original post by Fuzzed_Out)
    I disagree
    Read this then: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_steering

    Steering can obviously only be power-assisted, as the driver needs to control when to turn the wheel.
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    I'm an idiot and didn't read it properly.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Read this then: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_steering

    Steering can obviously only be power-assisted, as the driver needs to control when to turn the wheel.
    Point well made, I surrender.
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    I was under the impression that 'power steering' was to describe when there was no physical link between the steering wheel and the wheels. In the case of some tractors, mid-steer loaders and the like. On the other hand, 'power assisted steering' refers to cars with a physical connection from steering wheel to the wheels with hydraulic or electric assistance. All road going cars must by law have a physical connection to the wheels from the steering wheel (except for exceptions like tractors and other equipment which spends little time on the roads and at generally low speeds) although somehow cars like the DS seem to overcome this.

    I remember on Watchdog a while ago there was a batch of cars with engines that just cut out for no reason sometimes which resulted in 'a loss of steering and braking control' which is sheer ignorance really :/ You just have to turn the steering wheel harder or press the brake pedal harder. What about those poor old sods before PAS and servo assisted braking was invented?
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    My understanding was that 'power steering' was basically fly by wire, and 'power assisted steering' was exactly what it said on the tin.

    I shall leave the argument over the exact definitions to those already going at it.

    To the OP though, it won't make a blind bit of difference, its a steering wheel they aren't hard to use.
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    Technically there could be that distinction, but people generally skip the assisted part or don't know that that's what it's even called (which is supported by the Wikipedia page being called 'Power steering' with the clarification about assistance) so if it's a car with 'power steering' or 'power assisted steering' it's almost certainly the same thing.
    I don't think I've ever, ever heard anyone actually call it power assisted steering.
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    (Original post by DJW)
    Technically there could be that distinction, but people generally skip the assisted part or don't know that that's what it's even called (which is supported by the Wikipedia page being called 'Power steering' with the clarification about assistance) so if it's a car with 'power steering' or 'power assisted steering' it's almost certainly the same thing.
    I don't think I've ever, ever heard anyone actually call it power assisted steering.
    Basically this, if you don't understand the difference properly then you won't be driving a vehicle in which it matters. Any car a 17 year old will be driving will be power assisted steering, but it's nearly always called just power steering. Don't worry about it.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    Basically this, if you don't understand the difference properly then you won't be driving a vehicle in which it matters. Any car a 17 year old will be driving will be power assisted steering, but it's nearly always called just power steering. Don't worry about it.
    My first car had no power steering.

    Don't always assume that people will be taught by instructors or have cars bought by their parents.
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    In which case it definitely wouldn't matter as it wouldn't have either power steering or power assisted steering so the distinction wouldn't make the tiniest bit of difference...
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    (Original post by R. Murray)
    My first car had no power steering.

    Don't always assume that people will be taught by instructors or have cars bought by their parents.
    Don't assume my ignorance. I meant that if your car does have some form of power steering then it will almost certainly be PAS rather than power steering. If you're driving something with 'power steering' it's probable that you will have enough knowledge of cars and/or training to know the differences and how they affect you and the way you need to drive.

    It's also quite ignorant of you to assume that your car will only have power steering if it's your parents or if it's been bought you - i.e. expensive. My car was built in 1990 and has excellent power steering, as did the car before that built in 1988. I bought both of these myself, the first one for less than 1500 quid.

    I loved the old Massy Ferguson tractor I drove a lot in France over the summer, I could spin from lock to lock with my little finger effortlessly Was also awesome that you could spin almost on the spot around the inside rear tyre with some fiddle braking and full lock :eek3: Certainly better steering lock than my oil tanker of a car.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    Don't assume my ignorance. I meant that if your car does have some form of power steering then it will almost certainly be PAS rather than power steering. If you're driving something with 'power steering' it's probable that you will have enough knowledge of cars and/or training to know the differences and how they affect you and the way you need to drive.

    It's also quite ignorant of you to assume that your car will only have power steering if it's your parents or if it's been bought you - i.e. expensive. My car was built in 1990 and has excellent power steering, as did the car before that built in 1988. I bought both of these myself, the first one for less than 1500 quid.

    I loved the old Massy Ferguson tractor I drove a lot in France over the summer, I could spin from lock to lock with my little finger effortlessly Was also awesome that you could spin almost on the spot around the inside rear tyre with some fiddle braking and full lock :eek3: Certainly better steering lock than my oil tanker of a car.
    I'm not assuming that all old cars will be without power steering, but generally if you're getting an old first car, it's less likely to have power steering than one that's expensive and bought by parents.

    I never really had a problem with no power steering, you only noticed the lack of it at low speeds.
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    (Original post by R. Murray)
    I'm not assuming that all old cars will be without power steering, but generally if you're getting an old first car, it's less likely to have power steering than one that's expensive and bought by parents.

    I never really had a problem with no power steering, you only noticed the lack of it at low speeds.
    It really depends on the car you buy. A cheap eurobox may well not have power steering if it's from lower down on the spec sheet but most cars from Focus/Astra size and up have had power steering in the last 10 years, and lets be honest, 10 years old is 'old' in terms of modern cars. Funnily enough most teenagers haven't seemed to have cottoned on to the fact that the next car up in the range in terms of size will probably have cheaper insurance than your Saxo/Clio/Punto whatever, and will be a lot nicer to drive as well. Oh the irony.
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    It really depends on the car you buy. A cheap eurobox may well not have power steering if it's from lower down on the spec sheet but most cars from Focus/Astra size and up have had power steering in the last 10 years, and lets be honest, 10 years old is 'old' in terms of modern cars. Funnily enough most teenagers haven't seemed to have cottoned on to the fact that the next car up in the range in terms of size will probably have cheaper insurance than your Saxo/Clio/Punto whatever, and will be a lot nicer to drive as well. Oh the irony.
    So you're saying that a Micra will be a higher insurance group than say an Almera, including all the equivalents of other manufacturers?

    Micra Vs. Almera

    Clio Vs. Megane

    Alto Vs. Swift

    Corsa Vs. Astra

    Fiesta Vs. Focus

    Based on insurance groups I can't really see how your point is valid.
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    Ok so I am going to take it upon myself to end the thread here because none of this actually helped and many of you are just using it as a chance to show who knows more, etc.
    [/thread]
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    (Original post by R. Murray)
    So you're saying that a Micra will be a higher insurance group than say an Almera, including all the equivalents of other manufacturers?

    Micra Vs. Almera

    Clio Vs. Megane

    Alto Vs. Swift

    Corsa Vs. Astra

    Fiesta Vs. Focus

    Based on insurance groups I can't really see how your point is valid.
    Because insurance price is not really based on groups, it is based more on risk and number of those cars that are attributed to a high risk group.

    I.e. chavs drive Saxos, therefore Saxo's crash a lot, risk is high on a Saxo for a chav to drive it, therefore, high premium.

    Chavs do not drive a Volvo, unlikely to crash, lower chance of payout, lower risk, lower premium despite the higher insurance group.

    You need to learn how insurance works, not try and be smart.

    Besides, there is no difference really between group 3 and 4. 4 and 15 maybe, not one group.
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Because insurance price is not really based on groups, it is based more on risk and number of those cars that are attributed to a high risk group.

    I.e. chavs drive Saxos, therefore Saxo's crash a lot, risk is high on a Saxo for a chav to drive it, therefore, high premium.

    Chavs do not drive a Volvo, unlikely to crash, lower chance of payout, lower risk, lower premium despite the higher insurance group.

    You need to learn how insurance works, not try and be smart.

    Besides, there is no difference really between group 3 and 4. 4 and 15 maybe, not one group.
    I've seen the difference between an insurance group 9 and 10 car, it was about another £100, which isn't nothing.

    So if the "high risk" cars like old 106's and saxos grouped in the same insurance group as a micra for example, why are the insurance prices similar even though one is high risk and one is a lower risk?

    I'm not being smart, I'm actually curious as to how the insurance works.

    I don't see how a 17 year old in a small engined hatchback is more dangerous than a 17 year old in a large engined estate.
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    (Original post by Biggsx)
    Ok so I am going to take it upon myself to end the thread here because none of this actually helped and many of you are just using it as a chance to show who knows more, etc.
    [/thread]
    If you think none of it helped you might want to try reading the thread and noticing that several people told you it was exactly the same thing...
 
 
 
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