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    Hi,

    I'm sure I'm not the only IB student worried about achieving my offer. I've been asked to get 40 points with 7s in maths and physics, which is not an easy offer by any means.

    Despite statistics that show that over 90% of students offered a place achieve their conditions, the majority of students at my school offered a place have missed their offers and consequently been rejected. This is thanks to the difficulty of their IB offers in relation to those set for other examination boards.

    Anyhow, I wanted to know how many current students have missed their offer, by how much, and how long they had to wait after results to hear from Oxford. I know that it may seem a bit silly to be fretting over this at this point, but I'm just curious about the numbers...

    Thanks
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    *watch thread
    yeah, apparently its super hard to get 7s in HL maths, much more than it is to get an A at A level....
    What did you apply for?
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    True- the IB should be recalibrated.
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    (Original post by patientology)
    True- the IB should be recalibrated.
    No, the A level system should be made harder. Looks great for governments to say we have the best results ever every year, however in reality this just screws over us students because it becomes extremely hard to get university places because of total debasing of the A grade.

    To the OP, sadly all you can do should you miss your offer is to call the college and beg (assuming you dont do anything like appeal to the IB board etc).
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    I don't know, to be honest - my Australian friend who did the IB said that she thought the offer seemed very low (she beat it by six points, which sounds like a lot) but she did go to quite a good school, so it's difficult to say.

    EDIT: I didn't notice that you'd specified your offer - hers was only 39 with a 7 in maths, I think. So yours does seem quite tricky, though definitely not unmanageable! The idea is if you struggle to make that then you'll struggle to pass exams at Oxford, so concentrate on getting that!
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    I applied for Engineering Science.

    I do have a 2240 SAT and 800s in Maths and Physics subject tests, so hopefully those can help me in the case that I miss my offer, seeing as they often use these scores as the basis for offers for American applicants.

    Haha, I like how I'm already planning this. Probably should just focus on getting the grades!
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    That is a pretty stiff offer. And still, they're going around giving out 38 point offers with no subjects specified, which is absolutely incomparable. They still do not understand the IB.
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    (Original post by shamrock92)
    They still do not understand the IB.
    Frankly, that's wrong. Personally, I think the tutors perfectly understand the IB - it gives them the opportunity to ask students to get the grades that, in an ideal world, they'd like everyone they accept to achieve. In regards to some offers having no subjects specified, and some asking for 7's in Maths and Physics, that just depends on how relevant IB study is to the Oxford course - Engineering has a LOT of very hard Physics and Maths, so they want offer holders to show they can manage it. Subjects like Oriental Studies or Psychology (which are of course still extremely challenging) do not have courses at school which are as particularly relevant to them, so they don't have any reason to ask for specific points in specific subjects. In terms of the range of offers, some tutors want people to get 38, some want 40 - that's just their preference, and the difference between those scores isn't particularly vast anyway.

    OP - try not to worry too much about it. After my initial thrill at receiving an offer, I spent the rest of the IB terrified that I would miss it (40 points overall with 7 in HL Biology, for Biology). I know Maths and Physics are hard, but if you got in for Engineering it means you probably have the capacity to get a 7 in both of them (I got a 7 in HL Maths somehow, and I was never particularly talented in it). You just need to put the hard work in. If that doesn't work, tutors tend to be more lenient than they would be if an A Level candidate missed a grade. I know someone who was asked for 40, got 37 and was still let in. It depends on individual circumstances etc., and there are lots of people I'm sure who miss it by a point and get rejected. But it wouldn't be a completely lost cause.

    So essentially, don't fret, and work hard. Having a tough goal gave me the motivation I needed to end up with a great score. And in my experience, Oxford is a much easier transition from the IB than it is from A Levels
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    My friend missed a 7 in Maths (she got a 6) and they let her in.....and she was studying maths....
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    At a place like Oxford (or any Red Brick/Russell Group uni, really), you should never put your hopes on being let in if you miss your grades.
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    You don't have much chance. But always try, you never know. Especially if you missed it only by a couple of points, or if there were any circumstances you could blame. It pretty much depends on how many people decline or miss their offer.
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    I've consistently gotten 7s in maths and physics throughout the two years, but there's no guarantee of getting a 7 in the real thing... It's very easy for the exam to go both ways in IB. I got 7s in my mocks, but I'll need to keep focused until May. Thanks for all the responses
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    (Original post by somebody else)
    IB maths is hard, but if you can't get a 7 you'd probably struggle with maths/physics/engineering at Oxford anyway. I got 11% over the minimum needed for a 7 and did IB further maths and the maths for physics is still bloody hard. There is a lot less room for messing stuff up than in A levels, but they should probably raise the offer to A* in maths... they haven't because it would make things impossibly hard for people who went to bad schools; if you go to a bad IB school then you're stuffed.
    Or alternatively because they're trying to keep a unified policy, and while asking for an A* in Maths would make sense (because there is no room for marker's preference in marking scripts, and because A-level syllabus correlates reasonably well for general talent) in other subjects there's yet to be any proof that an A* at A-level correlates with the kind of candidate that they want.
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    It sounds to me like the IB offers are a lot harder to meet than the A level offers. Why does this appear to be the case? It seems highly unfair to me.
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    (Original post by Copatetic)
    It sounds to me like the IB offers are a lot harder to meet than the A level offers. Why does this appear to be the case? It seems highly unfair to me.
    Did you notice how Cambridge raised their standard A-level offer to A*AA but left IB offers unchanged?

    This in practice means either that
    a) A-level offers used to be (or still are) easier than IB offers, or
    b) A-level offers are now harder than IB offers (if so, why aren't any A-level people complaining?).
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    I think more people should be made to do the IB, its clearly more stretching than A Levels. Good Luck!
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    I've consistently gotten 7s in maths and physics throughout the two years, but there's no guarantee of getting a 7 in the real thing... It's very easy for the exam to go both ways in IB. I got 7s in my mocks, but I'll need to keep focused until May. Thanks for all the responses
    If this is the case CocoPop, you shouldn't worry at all! Just keep doing what you're doing now!

    I need to work on 7s in HL Maths and HL Physics too!
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    (Original post by Copacetic)
    It sounds to me like the IB offers are a lot harder to meet than the A level offers. Why does this appear to be the case? It seems highly unfair to me.
    I'm guessing it's really hard for them to compare exactly how difficult grades are. I got an offer for my Dutch grades which is so easy I really thought they made a mistake until I heard someone else got the same thing. Meanwhile Cambridge offers for Dutch students are near-impossible, my friends boyfriend is in total panic-mode because he doesn't know how on earth he's gonna pull this off. Neither is really fair, but admissions people apparently have better things to do then check up on what kind of offers they should make.
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    Well on the Oxford website they said that they would use this year's admission statistics to determine whether a standard IB offer (across the board - for all courses) of 38-40 with 766 at HL would be suitable. It seems that they are reevaluating their IB offers and trying to better understand the system.

    However, I do agree that many UK universities are not aware of what the IB entails and consequently end up giving ridiculous offers.
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    (Original post by jay8)
    Frankly, that's wrong. Personally, I think the tutors perfectly understand the IB - it gives them the opportunity to ask students to get the grades that, in an ideal world, they'd like everyone they accept to achieve. In regards to some offers having no subjects specified, and some asking for 7's in Maths and Physics, that just depends on how relevant IB study is to the Oxford course - Engineering has a LOT of very hard Physics and Maths, so they want offer holders to show they can manage it. Subjects like Oriental Studies or Psychology (which are of course still extremely challenging) do not have courses at school which are as particularly relevant to them, so they don't have any reason to ask for specific points in specific subjects. In terms of the range of offers, some tutors want people to get 38, some want 40 - that's just their preference, and the difference between those scores isn't particularly vast anyway.
    The tutor that gave me my second Maths interview didn't even know what the IB was. He ended up having to ask me questions about the content of Maths HL to determine what kind of areas to probe with his questions. Of course, that's just an isolated instance; but, contrary to what you say, I think there's general evidence for this. Yes, 7s in Maths and Physics may be relevant to a Physics/Engineering degree at Oxbridge, but why then are we not seeing A*A*A offers for Physics/Engineering candidates studying the A-level? I don't think we can just crudley equate a 7 at Maths HL to an A in Maths A-level, but that's what the tutors seem to be doing.

    It's the inconsistencies that I'm worried about. I know someone who has an offer of 41 with 7s in Maths and Chemistry HL for Medicine, and another who has an AA offer for the same course, both of them at Cambridge. There's no way that they're comparable.
 
 
 
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