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    (Original post by shamrock92)
    There's no way that they're comparable.
    Yeah I completely agree, if i got 60% in latin and 62% in economics this year then that would be enough to get me in! (i have an AAA offer but have an a in maths already from the 5 modules i did last year. so much easier than ib, all examined at the end. i'm not complaining though :p:
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    (Original post by elieshout)
    I'm guessing it's really hard for them to compare exactly how difficult grades are. I got an offer for my Dutch grades which is so easy I really thought they made a mistake until I heard someone else got the same thing. Meanwhile Cambridge offers for Dutch students are near-impossible, my friends boyfriend is in total panic-mode because he doesn't know how on earth he's gonna pull this off. Neither is really fair, but admissions people apparently have better things to do then check up on what kind of offers they should make.
    I'm curious... what's his offer then? (dutch Cambridge rejectee:rolleyes:) A girl I knew first got an offer of 10 in three science subjects :eek3: But she replied this was sort of impossible, so they changed it to 9 in two subjects and 10 in one, then she replied again that the 10 was just too hard. So then they changed into three times a 9 I think...
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    (Original post by Rvg)
    I'm curious... what's his offer then? (dutch Cambridge rejectee:rolleyes:) A girl I knew first got an offer of 10 in three science subjects :eek3: But she replied this was sort of impossible, so they changed it to 9 in two subjects and 10 in one, then she replied again that the 10 was just too hard. So then they changed into three times a 9 I think...
    I believe it was a 9 in three subjects and at least an 8 in the rest, don't know wheter they specified any subjects. I also know someone who did Classics who had to have at least a 9.0 in Greek and Latin, and one other subject. 10's are indeed too hard to demand, especially for science, the only subject I could possibly get that is Economics, but that's because it's such an easy subject, I'll be happy if I get an 8 for all my sciences. It's really cool of them to change the offer though, didn't think they'd do that.
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    (Original post by elieshout)
    I believe it was a 9 in three subjects and at least an 8 in the rest, don't know wheter they specified any subjects. I also know someone who did Classics who had to have at least a 9.0 in Greek and Latin, and one other subject. 10's are indeed too hard to demand, especially for science, the only subject I could possibly get that is Economics, but that's because it's such an easy subject, I'll be happy if I get an 8 for all my sciences. It's really cool of them to change the offer though, didn't think they'd do that.
    Yeah.. The question is, do the grades have to be 9 as in 8.5 = 9 or 9 as in 9.0 = 9. The latter would be very difficult, the first would surely be realistic... And even easier when it's unspecified, of course.
    The thing with 10's is, though, that you just cannot trust to get a 10. It might happen, but you cannot be sure until you have one, while you can be pretty sure of achieving 9's and 8's.
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    (Original post by Rvg)
    Yeah.. The question is, do the grades have to be 9 as in 8.5 = 9 or 9 as in 9.0 = 9. The latter would be very difficult, the first would surely be realistic... And even easier when it's unspecified, of course.
    The thing with 10's is, though, that you just cannot trust to get a 10. It might happen, but you cannot be sure until you have one, while you can be pretty sure of achieving 9's and 8's.
    As far as I know it's 8.5 = 9, that's how it'll appear on our final grades list. If they want 9.0 they specify this. You're right about 10's, it's impossible to get more than 9.5 for SE as you're bound to screw up at some point, and CE is so unpredictable.
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    I have a feeling they'll deny anyone who doesn't make their offer, even if they heavily underestimate the difficulty of the IB.
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    (Original post by kingofthering)
    I have a feeling they'll deny anyone who doesn't make their offer, even if they heavily underestimate the difficulty of the IB.
    Well that's a very wild assumption to make which I can assure you, from personal experience, is totally inaccurate. I know a decent handful of people here (still a considerable minority - but more than simply one or two) who missed their offers and were still accepted, one of whom was an IB candidate who (I think) missed his offer by 2 points for Law and was still let in.

    Basically, there is no set rule - everything will be reliant upon each individual candidate i.e. how well you did at interview, any admissions tests maybe, the subjects you missed your offer in, and also how many spaces are available for your course that year (i.e. do they have open offer candidates to place etc.). All you can do is work as hard as possible now and if something goes wrong, ring them up on results day. My friend who missed his IB offer was told he would have to wait until A level results before they confirmed his place, though, so I guess that could happen to other IB people too.
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    (Original post by Mook)
    Well that's a very wild assumption to make which I can assure you, from personal experience, is totally inaccurate. I know a decent handful of people here (still a considerable minority - but more than simply one or two) who missed their offers and were still accepted, one of whom was an IB candidate who (I think) missed his offer by 2 points for Law and was still let in.

    Basically, there is no set rule - everything will be reliant upon each individual candidate i.e. how well you did at interview, any admissions tests maybe, the subjects you missed your offer in, and also how many spaces are available for your course that year (i.e. do they have open offer candidates to place etc.). All you can do is work as hard as possible now and if something goes wrong, ring them up on results day. My friend who missed his IB offer was told he would have to wait until A level results before they confirmed his place, though, so I guess that could happen to other IB people too.
    Good post.
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    (Original post by Mook)
    Well that's a very wild assumption to make which I can assure you, from personal experience, is totally inaccurate. I know a decent handful of people here (still a considerable minority - but more than simply one or two) who missed their offers and were still accepted, one of whom was an IB candidate who (I think) missed his offer by 2 points for Law and was still let in.

    Basically, there is no set rule - everything will be reliant upon each individual candidate i.e. how well you did at interview, any admissions tests maybe, the subjects you missed your offer in, and also how many spaces are available for your course that year (i.e. do they have open offer candidates to place etc.). All you can do is work as hard as possible now and if something goes wrong, ring them up on results day. My friend who missed his IB offer was told he would have to wait until A level results before they confirmed his place, though, so I guess that could happen to other IB people too.
    Good point, but I'm still doubting the likelihood of being accepted as I read recently that Oxford gives out 1.1 offers per place.
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    (Original post by kingofthering)
    Good point, but I'm still doubting the likelihood of being accepted as I read recently that Oxford gives out 1.1 offers per place.
    Well yeah, but (a) that figure is WAY lower than competitor universities and (b) it's planning forward for the extra 10% to miss their offers/decline their places. And the unlucky IB people within that will be proportional. There's no favouring A-level candidates - in fact, getting 39 on a 40 offer looks better than getting AAB on an AAA offer (though obviously the grade make-up would be taken into account too).
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    *bumpity bump bump*
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    (Original post by kingofthering)
    *bumpity bump bump*
    What are you bumping for? You're wrong, and you've already been told so. If you want some evidence, trawl some TSR threads for a while. It's much more common for IB-ers to miss their grades and get in than A-levels :dontknow:
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    Sadly it is very clear that Oxbridge do not understand the IB. I think a realistic equivalent to AAA or even A*AA would be 40 (7,6,6) perhaps with the 7 in the most relevant subject.

    I may be wrong, but I have a theory that IB offers are heavily dependent on predicted grades. I was predicted 45, and my offer was 42 (I got 43). And when you think about it, there is no justifiable reason why anyone who is predicted 45 should get less than 42. It was bad enough that I got 43. Yet there are others who are predicted lower (~40) and are made offers for around that or even as low as 38. So I think they try to anticipate what we're capable of and make an offer accordingly, some of which will SEEM ridiculous (my 42 offer for Music, for example) but are really just reflective of our ability.
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    (Original post by StormStryke)
    Sadly it is very clear that Oxbridge do not understand the IB. I think a realistic equivalent to AAA or even A*AA would be 40 (7,6,6) perhaps with the 7 in the most relevant subject.
    Which is relevant how? Oxford can't request more than AAA while there's nothing more than AAA to get, and until they have some data about whether the students they want are actually getting A*s this year they can't raise the offer. Just because they ask for more from IB-ers than they ask for from A-level students doesn't mean that they don't understand the system. Most universities adjust their offers relative to predictive grades - just because for A-level students the offer is as high as it can go doesn't mean they should suddenly become inflexible for IBers
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    (Original post by Bekaboo)
    Which is relevant how? Oxford can't request more than AAA while there's nothing more than AAA to get, and until they have some data about whether the students they want are actually getting A*s this year they can't raise the offer. Just because they ask for more from IB-ers than they ask for from A-level students doesn't mean that they don't understand the system. Most universities adjust their offers relative to predictive grades - just because for A-level students the offer is as high as it can go doesn't mean they should suddenly become inflexible for IBers
    Whether the students they want get A*s this year is hardly useful information. Students with offers of AAA have no incentive to do the extra work required to get A*s, since by far the most important thing to them is meeting their offer. If they gave offers requiring A*s, most students would aim for them and subsequently achieve them.
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    (Original post by StormStryke)
    Sadly it is very clear that Oxbridge do not understand the IB. I think a realistic equivalent to AAA or even A*AA would be 40 (7,6,6) perhaps with the 7 in the most relevant subject.
    That is the most common offer. Typically the offer is 38-40 overall, with 6s and 7s in HL subjects. Your 42 is an anomaly, not the norm.

    (Original post by Roundabout)
    Whether the students they want get A*s this year is hardly useful information. Students with offers of AAA have no incentive to do the extra work required to get A*s, since by far the most important thing to them is meeting their offer. If they gave offers requiring A*s, most students would aim for them and subsequently achieve them.
    The University is interested in national trends, not just the final grades of people it's already given offers to.
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    Well, think of it percentage-wise. Around 40% of students taking A level maths achieve A's. 5-8% of IB HL Maths students get 7s. There is NO WAY that the A* is going to cut down the number of people getting a top grade by 32% of test takers, and it should therefore follow, without the slightest hesitation, that an A* can be equated to a 7 (if not less).
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    Well, think of it percentage-wise. Around 40% of students taking A level maths achieve A's. 5-8% of IB HL Maths students get 7s. There is NO WAY that the A* is going to cut down the number of people getting a top grade by 32% of test takers, and it should therefore follow, without the slightest hesitation, that an A* can be equated to a 7 (if not less).
    But isn't that a bit misleading in this case? As far as I understand, an awful lot of the people who take A-level maths are people who are really good at maths and taking Further Maths as well, so the A-level maths is a bit like a freebie for them. People who are actually quite bad at maths, on the other hand, can opt out of doing an A-level in either subject, whereas I think maths is a compulsory subject in the IB, so presumably there'll be quite a few people taking it who aren't really terribly good at it and are only taking it because they have no choice. So if you're comparing percentages, you're kind of comparing apples and oranges.
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    Well, think of it percentage-wise. Around 40% of students taking A level maths achieve A's. 5-8% of IB HL Maths students get 7s. There is NO WAY that the A* is going to cut down the number of people getting a top grade by 32% of test takers, and it should therefore follow, without the slightest hesitation, that an A* can be equated to a 7 (if not less).
    I totally agree with you that Maths HL is much harder than A-level, and I'd bet a lot of money that the first department to jump at the chance to start asking for A*s will be Maths. But it's not about single subjects.

    If Oxford had said yes, we'll start using the A* straight away, fine, but all the colleges and departments have agreed a common policy not to go beyond AAA until 2012 entry. There wasn't a single offer this year including an A* grade.

    But Oxford colleges have far less autonomy than Cambridge colleges, and it will only be after serious statistical analysis of what the A* actually means that the University starts using it.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    But isn't that a bit misleading in this case? As far as I understand, an awful lot of the people who take A-level maths are people who are really good at maths and taking Further Maths as well, so the A-level maths is a bit like a freebie for them. People who are actually quite bad at maths, on the other hand, can opt out of doing an A-level in either subject, whereas I think maths is a compulsory subject in the IB, so presumably there'll be quite a few people taking it who aren't really terribly good at it and are only taking it because they have no choice. So if you're comparing percentages, you're kind of comparing apples and oranges.
    You're right that only those who are good at maths will take it at A-Level. However, it's the same for IB maths Higher Level - our school only allows students who achieve A* in IGCSE to take HL maths. And in the last 3 years at my school, 3 people have gotten 7s (out of the 40+ people who got A*s at IGCSE).

    It's compulsory for everyone to take maths at IB, but those who are bad at it will take maths studies or maths methods SL. All people in my school taking maths HL have applied for engineering/maths/physics or other maths intensive courses, so it's expected that they're as good at the subject as their A Level counterparts.

    (Original post by pf1)
    I totally agree with you that Maths HL is much harder than A-level, and I'd bet a lot of money that the first department to jump at the chance to start asking for A*s will be Maths. But it's not about single subjects.

    If Oxford had said yes, we'll start using the A* straight away, fine, but all the colleges and departments have agreed a common policy not to go beyond AAA until 2012 entry. There wasn't a single offer this year including an A* grade.

    But Oxford colleges have far less autonomy than Cambridge colleges, and it will only be after serious statistical analysis of what the A* actually means that the University starts using it.
    I agree. Oxford is one of the few universities who is introducing the A* grade wisely - by taking a statistical approach and trying to better understand the system. I think for other universities it's more of an issue of prestige. Offering A*s is an indication of rising standards. Nevertheless, it's still a bit unfair from the perspective of us IB students, who have to go through 6 months of stress between the time we get our offer and our IB results. On the other hand, those asked for 3 As can take the next few months with relative calm.
 
 
 
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