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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Erm, no, it isn't. The point of introducing the A* grade was to counter grade inflation a bit by allowing a distinction between As and very high As. The comparability of IB-points to A-level grades is a separate issue.
    Of course, the central point of the A* grade is to distinguish between the good and the very good. However, from the perspective of universities, they need to be able to determine who has achieved the very best grades. That system of grade distinction has already been in place in the IB for the last 30+ years, making it only logical for universities to raise A level offers while keeping IB offers the same. So, the second point of the A* is to make it more comparable to IB and other exam boards.
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    no it isn't, stop trying to secondguess people
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    (Original post by probably not)
    no it isn't, stop trying to secondguess people
    It's called basic logic. A levels were not capable of distinguishing the best from the very best. The IB was. Therefore IB offers will tend to be harder to achieve than A level offers at top universities. With the introduction of the A*, IB and A level offers should become harmonized.

    This isn't trying to second guess people - an Oxford admissions officer who visited my school told me the same. There would be no point in the A* if universities could already distinguish between the top candidates. Why do you think the IB grading system has never changed?

    39 points with 7s in maths and physics should not equate to A*AA.

    Anyway, this thread has gone on for too long xD
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    Of course, the central point of the A* grade is to distinguish between the good and the very good. However, from the perspective of universities, they need to be able to determine who has achieved the very best grades. That system of grade distinction has already been in place in the IB for the last 30+ years, making it only logical for universities to raise A level offers while keeping IB offers the same. So, the second point of the A* is to make it more comparable to IB and other exam boards.
    Perhaps so, but until fairly recently, the percentage of IB-students among applicants would have been pretty much negligible, no? Even according to the statistics for the last admissions cycle, IB-students accounted for less than 6% of the people given offers. No offence, but I'm just not convinced that the IB is actually a popular enough qualification yet to be given the sort of consideration that you seem to be implying...:dontknow:
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    It's called basic logic. A levels were not capable of distinguishing the best from the very best. The IB was. Therefore IB offers will tend to be harder to achieve than A level offers at top universities. With the introduction of the A*, IB and A level offers should become harmonized.

    This isn't trying to second guess people - an Oxford admissions officer who visited my school told me the same. There would be no point in the A* if universities could already distinguish between the top candidates. Why do you think the IB grading system has never changed?

    39 points with 7s in maths and physics should not equate to A*AA.

    Anyway, this thread has gone on for too long xD
    do you genuinely not understand the implications of the word "point"? while it's great that a-levels and the ib aree now more easily comparable, that wasn't the point - the point was to distinguish between people within the a boundary. oxford admissions officers don't make the decisions about what grades you can get in things.
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    Any one have any updates on this?
 
 
 
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