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    I currently study AS levels in Art and ICT and A2 in Economics and Maths. I am meant to be going to University this September, however as I picked up new subjects I am going to be staying at college for another year. If I successfully pass my Economics and Maths this year, I may pick up A level Applied Science.
    I have no idea what I want to do at University, one day I want to do Business the next I want to do Art. I want something that will combine all my subjects that I am studying now. Today my art teacher asked if I wanted to do business at Uni due to me having three business type subjects and she said she doesn't want me to let go off Art! To be honest, I don't want to either! Art is my passion, I've lost it once (in my first year of college for not picking it) but luckily I've picked it up this year, I don't want to let go off it again.. however, I love problem solving and decision making! So I really want a course at Uni that involves a bit of both!
    Someone who is studying Architecture could you please explain what you do? Is it a combination of art and science? Is there a high chance of employability?
    Answers will be much appreciated. Thanks for your time!
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    I was in a similar situation to you a while ago and I ended up choosing another of my interest over architecture. The main reason being that I didn't feel I would be commited enough to undertake this course espicially as it is alot more demanding in terms of time and resource compared to other subjects. I have an interest in art, but I just felt if I studied architecture, there would just be a point whereby the workload would be so overwhelming that I would begin to hate the subject all together. Even though I haven't studied architecture, I draw from my experiences of the all nighters that I had to do just for my GCSE and AS-level art. Therefore, I concluded that if I studied architecture, I would simply callopse under the immense workload and pressure. But then again, its all about time management and if you can organise yourself then you would have a much pleasant experience at the course.

    my advice would be to go and do work experience with an architecture practice so that you can truly find out whether this is what you would like to do for the rest of your life.
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    (Original post by W.H.T)

    my advice would be to go and do work experience with an architecture practice so that you can truly find out whether this is what you would like to do for the rest of your life.
    This is exactly what I was about to say (I'm studying architecture by the way)
    Have a look at a couple of uni websites with examples of students work as well so you get an idea of what you will get up to

    Best of Luck
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    Problem solving,science,art,architecture = Landscape/Urban Architecture course! I chose it over architecture. It allows you to be more creative in your designs. and so much more tbh.
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    Civil Engineering all the wayyyy.

    Work experience with an architecture practice is the way to go. But have you ever considered Civil Engineering? Just a thought.
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    i don't think it's right for you. personally i decided i wanted to be an architect when i was around 11.
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    (Original post by Jfranny)
    i don't think it's right for you. personally i decided i wanted to be an architect when i was around 11.
    I don't think thats fair - we only have a very short description to base our opinions on and so it would be unfair to jump to conclusions, (although I do agree that most people come to the conclusion fairly early on in life that they specifically want to study architecture)

    There is a guy in my year who is 65 and taking his part one (I know we all thought he was a lecturer on the first day!) It takes different people different amount of time to come to a conclusion with what they want to do.

    As I said in my above post Work Experience and checking out architecture departments (as well as other subjects to compare) is the best way to decided whether architecture is really for you. I would also suggest reading some of the threads on here - although extreme at times they do give you a pretty good idea of what studying architecture is about.
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    look up civil engineering -
    civil engineers are mainly mathematical nd problem solvers, BUT they actually do alot more design work than you think. Alot of the course actually relies on you making/drawing out designs in groups and 'making it work'. Also, my auncle is a civil engineer and told me that as a civil engineer, there are lots of times where you are required to carry out the work of an architect (as in design) as well as the other maths/science based problems.

    LOOK UP : architecture and civil eng JOINED --- bath and city are two that i know offer it -- bath is really good btw
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    (Original post by Jfranny)
    i don't think it's right for you. personally i decided i wanted to be an architect when i was around 11.
    sorry, but this is the stupidest comment i've read on here in a while
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    (Original post by RocketTown)
    sorry, but this is the stupidest comment i've read on here in a while
    Well said
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    although it is obviously impossible to say definitively given none of us know you, my gut feeling would be 'no'. architecture isn't generally one of those things you fall into, you need to be fairly fired up about it as if you're not, then you won't be able to muster the energy to put in the hours required. there were quite a few people in my first year who had sort of been guided into it by their careers officer or had been thinking like you - science and art - but actually were fairly ambivalent about what they really wanted to do. they dropped out one by one over the course of the first year.

    if you are not sure what you want to do, how about deferring and trying a few jobs, if you can, travel a bit, see what you are inspired by. architecture is a very difficult degree to do if you are not 100% committed to it.
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    (Original post by RocketTown)
    sorry, but this is the stupidest comment i've read on here in a while
    first and foremost the op asked whether or not we thought architecture was right for her. personally i don't think it is, hence why i replied.

    "I have no idea what I want to do at University, one day I want to do Business the next I want to do Art. I want something that will combine all my subjects that I am studying now."

    so it's clear from this quote that the op only recognised architecture as a career after looking into degrees that related to her current subjects. it's not as if it was a spontaneous decision derived from maybe an interest in architecture in general(not the degree).

    i wouldn't want to put across a false opinion however it wouldn't suprise me that the vast majority of architecture students who make it through the first year and then decide to do continue to do part two knew firmly from a relatively young age that they had a passion for architecture and knew that it was the main degree they wanted pursue. certainly for me this is the case.

    "Art is my passion"

    "Someone who is studying Architecture could you please explain what you do? Is it a combination of art and science? Is there a high chance of employability?"

    and on the basis of this quote i personally wouldn't advise the op to go into studying architecture at the moment. i'm not sure whether or not you know but the architecture course is vastly intense and has one of, if not thee, biggest drop out rates in the country.

    it's certainly not a course you choose to do in the final months leading up to the ucas deadline.

    i accept my post's latter comment was a bit silly
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    (Original post by Jfranny)
    i don't think it's right for you. personally i decided i wanted to be an architect when i was around 11.
    I didn't decide I wanted to be an architect until I was about 16. Even then I was swaying between architecture and graphic design for a year or so until I did some work experience. It doesn't make me a worse student than someone who says they "wanted to be an architect since I was I child" :rolleyes: Whenever someone says something like that in a personal statement I'm reviewing, I tell them to stay well away from that kind of thing. It's ******** and tutors know it.

    OP, don't worry that you shouldn't do architecture because it's not been your life's ambition since the moment you were born. This has already been said but I would advise you to get some work experience. Don't make the mistake of thinking "architecture is just a mixture of science and art". It's really not, it's a design course and although there are artistic elements and scientific elements, it's a lot more than that.

    The only person who should decide on your future is you. Go and do some work experience and you'll get a better idea of what working in the industry's really like.
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    (Original post by moregano)
    OP, don't worry that you shouldn't do architecture because it's not been your life's ambition since the moment you were born.
    But, the thing is, from reading their post, it doesn't sound like its their life's ambition now, just some compromise between science and art. There's plenty of jobs that fall between that spectrum, and architecture is definitely not something you want to wander into accidentally.
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    (Original post by jrhartley)
    But, the thing is, from reading their post, it doesn't sound like its their life's ambition now, just some compromise between science and art. There's plenty of jobs that fall between that spectrum, and architecture is definitely not something you want to wander into accidentally.
    I know, a lot of people tend to make the science/art mistake. The fact that the OP says "I want something that will combine all my subjects that I am studying now" is a bit worrying. But there's nothing wrong with doing some research and work experience. I was just pointing out that you can still be a dedicated student if it's not been your lifetime ambition since the age of eleven.
 
 
 
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