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    please somebody give me some advice. i'm so confused.

    basically, completed A2 last summer and decided to take a gapyear and then think about uni. but still haven't made a proper decision. went from yes to maybe to no to maybe to hopefully to confusion.

    i do work in website design and development atm, but the job is very inconsistent (small business) - for example, since before christmas i've had next to nothing to do. what i'd like to do is carry on with the work on the side for the pay and the experience, but study for a proper qualification of some sort as my main priority.

    what do you guys think about studying from home? at college i got ABCbb (HIST, PSYCH, DRAMA&THEATRE, english lit&lang, crit. thinking) - yeah i didn't even study anything I.T. based lol. but even my mothers suggesting it - she's just quit her job and has to be around to pick up my 3 younger siblings from school right in the middle of what would be working hours for her, and they all go to different schools and finish at different times, so it makes the job harder. my mother & i could do a course each and use each other for motivation, etc.

    so, to summarise: would preferably like to do a course from home, but i have no idea where to start, and would it be worth it? i'd like it to be worth the time/effort/finance put into it, but i don't know - it all seems a little too easy. are these courses worth a lot in terms of getting a good job? what does it mean to an employer? am i barking up the wrong tree and have i pulled all this out of my ass?



    ty for your helpppp xxx
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    You could try and open university course?
    Or is there a uni close to you that you could do your degree at and live it home?
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    (Original post by nbailey8)
    You could try and open university course?
    Or is there a uni close to you that you could do your degree at and live it home?

    god my internets slow today. sorry about the late reply. tsr's taking forever just to follow a damn link :<

    okay so, the former is probably a more preferable direction to take, - i considered the latter, though. what i like about doing it from home and in my own time is that, from experience, i've noticed how changeable i am in terms of attitude towards work, it can change drastically within a single week - one day i'll be ridiculously motivated and essays will be coming out of my ears and i'll be happy about it, but another i'll be bummed out and depressed by it all and not want to bother, and then i'll get swamped and it gets so much worse. i'd like to have less of a time scale, like, no deadlines, if that makes sense. ha sounds too perfect. really, the former would be preferable, 'cause working from home means i can still do my websites and paint my canvases on the side, so i'll have an outlet.

    and also i get very stressed about meeting new people and making good impressions, etc, which i'd avoid if i was working from home.
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    (Original post by rollover, pudding)
    god my internets slow today. sorry about the late reply. tsr's taking forever just to follow a damn link :<

    okay so, the former is probably a more preferable direction to take, - i considered the latter, though. what i like about doing it from home and in my own time is that, from experience, i've noticed how changeable i am in terms of attitude towards work, it can change drastically within a single week - one day i'll be ridiculously motivated and essays will be coming out of my ears and i'll be happy about it, but another i'll be bummed out and depressed by it all and not want to bother, and then i'll get swamped and it gets so much worse. i'd like to have less of a time scale, like, no deadlines, if that makes sense. ha sounds too perfect. really, the former would be preferable, 'cause working from home means i can still do my websites and paint my canvases on the side, so i'll have an outlet.

    and also i get very stressed about meeting new people and making good impressions, etc, which i'd avoid if i was working from home.
    First off, your bit at the end is not a reason that you should use for studying from home. It may be the "easy" option but that does not make it the right one and at some point in life and in a career you are going to have to meet new people and interact.

    Similarly I would also caution you on your comments about your motivation. If you are not highly self motivated then actually a structured course where you are *forced* to do something by a deadline may actually result in you do better. It's easy to leave things until tomorrow.

    Having said all that, there are a number of good reasons for studying at home. Continuing with your career is probably the key one here and of course it will be cheaper, though again that's not a good reason. If you do well then there is no reason an employer should look at it differently to university, especially if you have good work experience. However, this assumes that you will do as well as you would at university and that you won't miss out on other valuable development experiences related to going to university (independence for example).

    In conclusion, I can't give you an answer. Certainly studying at home may not hinder you, but do make sure that you are doing it for the right reasons.
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    thankyou for your response, this has been helpful

    circumstances have changed slightly recently, and it seems as if i'm running 2 jobs at once atm, both part-time, and both call upon me when i'm needed, so it would give me plenty of time to study, and then if it gets busy i'm not behind on lectures, etc.

    i know it sounded a bit shallow, i apologise for that, but my reasons are very much based on convenience for both me and my family, and seems like what could be the best option. thankyou
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    (Original post by rollover, pudding)
    please somebody give me some advice. i'm so confused.
    Hi, I've worked in the web industry for the last 10 years. My advice would be to forget about taking a course at uni/college. In my experience they are almost always behind-the-times in terms of technology and techniques. They also hold no weight in the industry. The majority of employers will be self-taught and as such won't care much about your qualifications (but will care about your skill, ability and desire to learn quickly).

    Attend local user groups, read up on stuff like CSS3, HTML5, jQuery etc etc Follow the blogs of leading developers/designers. Learn by doing, create test sites using different frameworks and techniques "just because".

    Read the popular web design books (Cederholm, Zeldman etc). Understanding the stuff in "CSS Zen Garden" and "Don't Make Me Think" will do more for your career than a college/uni course. :yep:
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    If you do decide to do a degree, i think the open university option seems good for you. I know you can do a lot of their foundation degrees from home and i think full degrees too. They have a page on distance learning http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/explain...learning.shtml
 
 
 

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