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Exercise won't make you lose weight watch

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    hey everyone



    i have been struggling with my weight over the past couple of years as im slightly overweight. However i was searching some diet and weight loss information in google and i came up across this article which is a bit old but i found it very interesting.

    im not using it as an excuse for not exercising in order to lose weight but it sort of made me think. is exercise really overrated as a mean of losing weight ? or the whole article is a bunch a crap?

    the article is huge (4 long pages with a lot of studies and research info ) but i took some parts out that i think sort of sum it up:



    "In general, for weight loss, exercise is pretty useless," says Eric Ravussin, chair in diabetes and metabolism at Louisiana State University and a prominent exercise researcher. Many recent studies have found that exercise isn't as important in helping people lose weight as you hear so regularly in gym advertisements or on shows like The Biggest Loser — or, for that matter, from magazines like this one.
    The basic problem is that while it's true that exercise burns calories and that you must burn calories to lose weight, exercise has another effect: it can stimulate hunger. That causes us to eat more, which in turn can negate the weight-loss benefits we just accrued. Exercise, in other words, isn't necessarily helping us lose weight. It may even be making it harder.



    You might think half a muffin over an entire day wouldn't matter much, particularly if you exercise regularly. After all, doesn't exercise turn fat to muscle, and doesn't muscle process excess calories more efficiently than fat does?
    Yes, although the muscle-fat relationship is often misunderstood. According to calculations published in the journal Obesity Research by a Columbia University team in 2001, a pound of muscle burns approximately six calories a day in a resting body, compared with the two calories that a pound of fat burns. Which means that after you work out hard enough to convert, say, 10 lb. of fat to muscle — a major achievement — you would be able to eat only an extra 40 calories per day, about the amount in a teaspoon of butter, before beginning to gain weight. Good luck with that.



    (if you can be bothered reading:p: )

    The Compensation Problem
    Earlier this year, the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE — PLoS is the nonprofit Public Library of Science — published a remarkable study supervised by a colleague of Ravussin's, Dr. Timothy Church, who holds the rather grand title of chair in health wisdom at LSU. Church's team randomly assigned into four groups 464 overweight women who didn't regularly exercise. Women in three of the groups were asked to work out with a personal trainer for 72 min., 136 min., and 194 min. per week, respectively, for six months. Women in the fourth cluster, the control group, were told to maintain their usual physical-activity routines. All the women were asked not to change their dietary habits and to fill out monthly medical-symptom questionnaires.
    The findings were surprising. On average, the women in all the groups, even the control group, lost weight, but the women who exercised — sweating it out with a trainer several days a week for six months — did not lose significantly more weight than the control subjects did. (The control-group women may have lost weight because they were filling out those regular health forms, which may have prompted them to consume fewer doughnuts.) Some of the women in each of the four groups actually gained weight, some more than 10 lb. each.
    What's going on here? Church calls it compensation, but you and I might know it as the lip-licking anticipation of perfectly salted, golden-brown French fries after a hard trip to the gym. Whether because exercise made them hungry or because they wanted to reward themselves (or both), most of the women who exercised ate more than they did before they started the experiment. Or they compensated in another way, by moving around a lot less than usual after they got home.




    http://www.time.com/time/health/arti...4857-1,00.html

    also if anybody managed to lose weight here without exercising maybe you could share your experience
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    haha i stopped reading when you said turn fat into muscle.

    yes...exercise is useless
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    Even the endorphins released during exercise have shown to be helpful in weight control and body image, let alone the effects of exercise itself.

    So I call BS

    EDIT: What that article explains is called greed. It's nothing to do with exercise. It also happens to be the reason why those people are overweight in the first place
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    (Original post by crème_de_la_crème)
    hey everyone



    i have been struggling with my weight over the past couple of years as im slightly overweight. However i was searching some diet and weight loss information in google and i came up across this article which is a bit old but i found it very interesting.

    im not using it as an excuse for not exercising in order to lose weight but it sort of made me think. is exercise really overrated as a mean of losing weight ? or the whole article is a bunch a crap?

    the article is huge (4 long pages with a lot of studies and research info ) but i took some parts out that i think sort of sum it up:



    "In general, for weight loss, exercise is pretty useless," says Eric Ravussin, chair in diabetes and metabolism at Louisiana State University and a prominent exercise researcher. Many recent studies have found that exercise isn't as important in helping people lose weight as you hear so regularly in gym advertisements or on shows like The Biggest Loser — or, for that matter, from magazines like this one.
    The basic problem is that while it's true that exercise burns calories and that you must burn calories to lose weight, exercise has another effect: it can stimulate hunger. That causes us to eat more, which in turn can negate the weight-loss benefits we just accrued. Exercise, in other words, isn't necessarily helping us lose weight. It may even be making it harder.



    You might think half a muffin over an entire day wouldn't matter much, particularly if you exercise regularly. After all, doesn't exercise turn fat to muscle, and doesn't muscle process excess calories more efficiently than fat does?
    Yes, although the muscle-fat relationship is often misunderstood. According to calculations published in the journal Obesity Research by a Columbia University team in 2001, a pound of muscle burns approximately six calories a day in a resting body, compared with the two calories that a pound of fat burns. Which means that after you work out hard enough to convert, say, 10 lb. of fat to muscle — a major achievement — you would be able to eat only an extra 40 calories per day, about the amount in a teaspoon of butter, before beginning to gain weight. Good luck with that.



    (if you can be bothered reading:p: )

    The Compensation Problem
    Earlier this year, the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE — PLoS is the nonprofit Public Library of Science — published a remarkable study supervised by a colleague of Ravussin's, Dr. Timothy Church, who holds the rather grand title of chair in health wisdom at LSU. Church's team randomly assigned into four groups 464 overweight women who didn't regularly exercise. Women in three of the groups were asked to work out with a personal trainer for 72 min., 136 min., and 194 min. per week, respectively, for six months. Women in the fourth cluster, the control group, were told to maintain their usual physical-activity routines. All the women were asked not to change their dietary habits and to fill out monthly medical-symptom questionnaires.
    The findings were surprising. On average, the women in all the groups, even the control group, lost weight, but the women who exercised — sweating it out with a trainer several days a week for six months — did not lose significantly more weight than the control subjects did. (The control-group women may have lost weight because they were filling out those regular health forms, which may have prompted them to consume fewer doughnuts.) Some of the women in each of the four groups actually gained weight, some more than 10 lb. each.
    What's going on here? Church calls it compensation, but you and I might know it as the lip-licking anticipation of perfectly salted, golden-brown French fries after a hard trip to the gym. Whether because exercise made them hungry or because they wanted to reward themselves (or both), most of the women who exercised ate more than they did before they started the experiment. Or they compensated in another way, by moving around a lot less than usual after they got home.




    http://www.time.com/time/health/arti...4857-1,00.html

    also if anybody managed to lose weight here without exercising maybe you could share your experience
    The key advantage of exercise, is not the weight loss but the ability to improve various aspects of bodily fitness aswell to ensure not only that one become lean but stays lean. If you want to justify laziness with erroneous articles such as this you can go ahead, but in that case you should seek out larger dress sizes and prepare your overweight appearance for the longterm. People who lose weight without exercise are prone to put it back on so its rather counterproductive, exercise is always advocated along with a healthy and balanced diet so Church's study seems rather pointless.
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    Sounds like new age bs to me in order to make you feel better about yourself.

    You can go for a run for say 30mins a day, but if you stuff your face full of crap afterwards of course you're gonna put on weight. You need to have discipline, self control and will power as well as exercise and possibly a calorie deficient diet.

    Hunger is pretty much an emotional response anyway. When you're hungry you're not thinking the logical way 'oh, my body needs the right amount of sustenance or it will die', you're thinking 'me hungry, i'll eat anything to fill me up'. Once you reign that in weight loss will follow.
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    That article is a load of ********. You don't NEED exercise for weight loss: you have to burn more calories than you consume to lose weight, exercise is a tool to do this. Saying exercise is ineffective though is stupid.

    http://exrx.net/FatLoss/Misconceptions.html
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    (Original post by del1507)
    That article is a load of ********. You don't NEED exercise for weight loss: you have to burn more calories than you consume to lose weight, exercise is a tool to do this. Saying exercise is ineffective though is stupid.

    http://exrx.net/FatLoss/Misconceptions.html
    Indeed, but considering most lifestyles of the average westerner are highly sedentary, exercise becomes critical in providing a form of physical exertion.
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    It's a load of rubbish.
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    It did with my brother - he maintained a relativley similar diet - but went from around 15 stone to 11 in like a year after he got a gym membership.
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    Exercise is great, but it is rubbish for loosing weight on its own, in order to loose 1lb of fat you have to burn about 3500 calories. That's a lot of exercise just to lose weight.

    You need a controlled diet and exercise. I've lost 16lbs in the last 2 months through eating and not a bit of extra exercise. Although I don't feel too great about myself because I have been lacking in the exercise front I don't feel so great.
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    Saying 'exercise makes you hungry' is pretty stupid. It might make you appreciate your next meal or whatever more but I have never ever finished exercising and immediately thought wow I really could do with some food now (I might have finished exercise and immediately eaten something cos I thought it looked nice and I could afford the calories but that's deffo greed and not hunger). You don't see people in the gym changing room stuffing their faces because their workout has made them so ravenous.
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    (Original post by Bishamon)
    Indeed, but considering most lifestyles of the average westerner are highly sedentary, exercise becomes critical in providing a form of physical exertion.
    Couldn't agree more. I'm a huge advocate of getting off your arse and doing some exercise.
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    Forget the article. Though you should still exercise because you will become fit.
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    If you think about it in a calorie input/output way, exercising is obviously going to make you lose weight.

    What the study seems to be talking about is psychological factors, which mean that people lose their strength of will after exercise, and so eat fattier foods, or compensate for increased activity by doing less. Perhaps you can say that these people are just lazy, lack self-control or whatever, but the fact remains is that's how people tend to react, and that is what the researchers were measuring, not what would be most effective in an ideal world. I found the study to make quite a lot of sense.
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    First things first the only way to lose weight is through calorie defecit i.e burning off more calories than you take in each day. so that can be done with exercise or controlling portions or whatever else. and its sort of true exercise does make you hungry, but it makes your body hungry for different things. if you sit around all day you may eat more sugary food or junk food, if you exercise you're more likely to crave carbohydrate. the difference is one is stored as fat, the other as glycogen which is used up during any form of exercise. so if its fat you want to shift, exercise is the way forward

    but more than that, exercise also sorts out high cholesterol, blood pressure issues, releases endorphines into the system etc so it cant be blamed for making you unhealthier
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    Exercise doesn't work well if you're trying to burn calories. (Heavy) Exercise however allows you to eat more by stimulating muscle growth, which of course requires energy. Stop carbs completely, except for one or two days a week. Eat protein and fats (50/50 ratio). Train hard (squat etc). Have a caloric deficit. And voila, you'll lose weight. It's actually pretty damn easy.
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    (Original post by Deadly Lightshade)
    If you think about it in a calorie input/output way, exercising is obviously going to make you lose weight.

    What the study seems to be talking about is psychological factors, which mean that people lose their strength of will after exercise, and so eat fattier foods, or compensate for increased activity by doing less. Perhaps you can say that these people are just lazy, lack self-control or whatever, but the fact remains is that's how people tend to react, and that is what the researchers were measuring, not what would be most effective in an ideal world. I found the study to make quite a lot of sense.
    I dont think I've heard anyone advocate a exercise regime without a balanced diet consisting of frequently spaced moderate meals to prevent gorging, this article fails to take that into consideration, thus is pointless. You cant measure a hypothesis when you havent taken all aspects of it into an account, it would be the equivalent of conducting an investigation and then manipulating the dependent variable, of course abstracted results will be yielded. All this study shows is that the eating habits of those in question were inefficient, it also verifies that 50% of any regime is about the diet. This is something that those with experience have been advocating since the beginning. A good regime must be complemented with a good diet in order to produce positive results. Yes, the respondents may have craved unhealthy sugars after training however this demand for glycogen replenishment could have been met with a higher protein + complex carb post workout meal, the frequency of their meals would have also heavily influenced their "hunger".
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    (Original post by Squeegy)
    Exercise doesn't work well if you're trying to burn calories. (Heavy) Exercise however allows you to eat more by stimulating muscle growth. Stop carbs completely, except for one or two days a week. Eat protein and fats (50/50 ratio). Train hard (squat etc). And voila, you'll lose weight.
    No.

    And please proceed to GTFO with nonsense like that.
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    (Original post by Squeegy)
    Exercise doesn't work well if you're trying to burn calories. (Heavy) Exercise however allows you to eat more by stimulating muscle growth. Stop carbs completely, except for one or two days a week. Eat protein and fats (50/50 ratio). Train hard (squat etc). And voila, you'll lose weight.
    Lol wut? :lolwut: :eek3:
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    (Original post by crème_de_la_crème)
    ...convert, say, 10 lb. of fat to muscle...
    Stopped reading here.

    OP: lolz.
 
 
 
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