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Exercise won't make you lose weight Watch

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    Exercise doesn't make me hungry, unless I've done a ridiculous amount of it on not enough food to start with. It seems to suppress my appetite and if I do want to eat afterwards, I go for healthy stuff, I just don't seem to want unhealthy food afterwards.
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    (Original post by crème_de_la_crème)
    i have been struggling with my weight over the past couple of years as im slightly overweight.
    No offense but I would bet money that if you ate a decent calorie controlled diet and got plenty of exercise you'd lose weight.

    If you want me or someone else to go into specifics by all means post what you eat and how much exercise you do in a typical day.

    (Original post by crème_de_la_crème)
    im not using it as an excuse for not exercising in order to lose weight but it sort of made me think. is exercise really overrated as a mean of losing weight ? or the whole article is a bunch a crap?
    Mainly the latter.

    It's not that exercise doesn't work but rather it's effects can be reversed relatively easily if you aren't diligent enough.

    To lose fat you need a degree of discipline unless you opt for very expensive and potentially life threatening surgery - whether it be in doing more exercise, eating less and/or eating better.

    The basic problem is that while it's true that exercise burns calories and that you must burn calories to lose weight, exercise has another effect: it can stimulate hunger. That causes us to eat more, which in turn can negate the weight-loss benefits we just accrued. Exercise, in other words, isn't necessarily helping us lose weight. It may even be making it harder.
    Then again if you don't do any exercise you're going to burn even fewer calories than you are burning enhancing fat gain and/or preventing weight loss.

    You have two options:

    1) Get some discipline, eat well and/or exercise propoerly (and lose fat)

    2) Do sweet FA (and stay fat)

    (Original post by Bishamon)
    No, you're not, carbohydrate depletion is a highly inefficient way of losing weight
    As I understand it a ketogenic diet conserves muscle while leading to pretty rapid losses of fat - personally I wouldn't call it inefficient by any means, harder to implement effectively yes.

    (Original post by Bishamon)
    and in some cases may even be dangerous
    If you're diabetic, maybe, if you're healthy, almost certainly not.

    (Original post by Bishamon)
    the loss of energy will work against both your cardiovascular and resistive performance.
    There are ways around that, doing more LISS compared to HIIT, consuming a bolus of carbs pre workout, cutting back on volume but maintaining intensity, etc.

    Pretty much any diet associated with a high calorie deficit and/or rapid weight loss is also associated with performance losses, whether it be low/high/moderate/whatever carb.

    (Original post by Bishamon)
    The lack of carbohydrates will also slow ones metabolism considerably
    Then again when you throw in the ketogenic shift and the decrease in calorific intake associated with reducing (or cutting) carb intake it's enough to lose weight in the vast majority of people.


    There are many different ways of losing fat, high carb, low carb, moderate carb, high fat, low fat, etc - they all have their advantages and disadvantages.
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    Your diet was probably **** and you probably thought exercise was the focal point rather than a tool.
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    Men's Health magazine did a response to that story.

    Just a silly coy by time magazine to sell a few magazines. Tell them what they want to hear.

    Excercise ftw, so many other benefits then just weightloss. Good for the mind and body.
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    (Original post by Squeegy)
    I'd like to see properly done research where it has been found inefficient. Or any research at all, in fact. And yes, it does slow down your metabolism, which is why you're supposed to take them carbs once or twice a week (and post workout, when the carbs go directly to your muscles).
    You shouldnt need one, its common sense and practical human biology at work. Since you appear that stupid here's a couple of tidbits to help you:

    http://www.rd.com/living-healthy/why...icle49515.html

    http://www.aphroditewomenshealth.com...lth_news.shtml

    http://www.theheart.org/article/157035.do

    http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20040...-protect-heart

    http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/low...1/a/myths1.htm

    As you should know (but probably dont) the low-carb diet boom is still in its relative infancy, the furore and positive uproar it caused in the early noughties was built upon questionable scientific evidence in which partakers were only subject to a modified dietary regimen for a few months at a time. Similarly, many government funded/operated health bodies have been stedfast in their advertisement of the "Atkins way". Whilst some have accepted it as a feasible method of weight loss, the American Diabetes Foundation, British Food Standards Agency, Australian Heart Association, and even Sweden's natonal board of health have all fallen short of endorsing its suggested "benefits". The US department of health was even quoted saying, "they're not the route to healthy, long-term weight management".

    http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/publ...althyheart.pdf

    Whilst not my favorite health related piece of documentation, you can see the diet is far from popular in the medical and scientific communities for your average joe.
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    Eric Ravussin is a troll. :eek:
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    Exercise isn't vital to losing weight, trust me, it speeds it up though. My diet doesn't change, but, when I walk more, I lose a couple of pounds simple as that.
    Weight loss is about burning more calories than you consume, exercise enables this unless you starve yourself. I think you're underestimating what counts as exercise. Anything from climbing the stairs to walking a hundred steps more than ususal will count.
    Exercise doesn't mean gym.
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    (Original post by *Sparkle*)
    Exercise is great, but it is rubbish for loosing weight on its own, in order to loose 1lb of fat you have to burn about 3500 calories. That's a lot of exercise just to lose weight.

    You need a controlled diet and exercise. I've lost 16lbs in the last 2 months through eating and not a bit of extra exercise. Although I don't feel too great about myself because I have been lacking in the exercise front I don't feel so great.
    :eek: how on earth did u manage to lose 16 lbs in 2 months?? :eek:
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    Bishamon: Yes, they tend to prefer low-fat diets.
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    The article hasn't taken into account calories burned during exercise? If you burn 400 calories during a workout, I doubt you are sufficiently hungry enough to eat 400 calories that you normally would not.
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    (Original post by Gopika123)
    :eek: how on earth did u manage to lose 16 lbs in 2 months?? :eek:
    It's not that hard...
    I've lost 12lbs in a month
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    its can people don't listen to this human person lol what done he/she know about losing weight of course you can lose weigh if you eat right and look after what you do while you still want to gain weight out.
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    (Original post by Gopika123)
    :eek: how on earth did u manage to lose 16 lbs in 2 months?? :eek:
    a combination of eating really really well and getting the flu, but mainly the eating. It's only 2lbs a week. Had a gain over Christmas.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    No offense but I would bet money that if you ate a decent calorie controlled diet and got plenty of exercise you'd lose weight.

    If you want me or someone else to go into specifics by all means post what you eat and how much exercise you do in a typical day.



    Mainly the latter.

    It's not that exercise doesn't work but rather it's effects can be reversed relatively easily if you aren't diligent enough.

    To lose fat you need a degree of discipline unless you opt for very expensive and potentially life threatening surgery - whether it be in doing more exercise, eating less and/or eating better.



    Then again if you don't do any exercise you're going to burn even fewer calories than you are burning enhancing fat gain and/or preventing weight loss.

    You have two options:

    1) Get some discipline, eat well and/or exercise propoerly (and lose fat)

    2) Do sweet FA (and stay fat)



    As I understand it a ketogenic diet conserves muscle while leading to pretty rapid losses of fat - personally I wouldn't call it inefficient by any means, harder to implement effectively yes.



    If you're diabetic, maybe, if you're healthy, almost certainly not.



    There are ways around that, doing more LISS compared to HIIT, consuming a bolus of carbs pre workout, cutting back on volume but maintaining intensity, etc.

    Pretty much any diet associated with a high calorie deficit and/or rapid weight loss is also associated with performance losses, whether it be low/high/moderate/whatever carb.



    Then again when you throw in the ketogenic shift and the decrease in calorific intake associated with reducing (or cutting) carb intake it's enough to lose weight in the vast majority of people.


    There are many different ways of losing fat, high carb, low carb, moderate carb, high fat, low fat, etc - they all have their advantages and disadvantages.
    My carb depletion phase has never extended beyond two/three weeks. Ketogenic diets rely largely upon an element of dietary bodily shock, as I have noticed whilst undertaking it, the positive effects are only temporary. Whilst excellent for last minute fat loss requirements its highly counterproductive for recreational dieters. Glycogen stores of the muscle and liver are depleted rapidly, glycogenesis is also interrupted. Its why the diet is so popular, a quick an somewhat temporary fix for those who arent geared towards the long term.

    Research indicates that muscle fatigue increases in almost direct proportion to the rate of depletion of muscle glycogen. Its included in some the links I posted, however I dont really need to provide cited sources to tell you this, the day of my last contest about two years ago or so, I could hardly curl a 10kg dumbell because the carbohydrate depletion had made me so weak. Low-carb diets lack of dietary fibres in things such as carb rich fruits also become a problem.

    Low carb, high protein diets cause ketosis, a type of metabolic acidosis. We all know the phrase, "fat burns in the flame of carbohydrate". Excess acetyl CoA cannot enter the Krebs Cycle due to insufficient OAA. In other words, for fat to burn efficiently and without production of excess toxic ketones, sufficient carbohydrate must be available. Ketosis can lead to many health problems and can be very serious at it's extreme.
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