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What is it that you want to provide for your children? watch

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    When people say that they want to provide better for their children, what exactly do you feel you've missed out on?

    I'm asking as this is one of the reasons people give for wanting to have a good career and make lots of money. Obviously ambition is a good thing but even if I did become well-off I wouldn't hand things to my children on a plate. I'd be more like Anita Roddick and expect my children to work hard themselves. (Not saying that all those whose parents do give them hand-outs don't work hard).

    I suppose I'm only asking this to people who have lived quite comfortably and not missed out on food or a place to live.
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    A loving, stable family. Number 1, pretty much. Failing that, a stable, self-sufficient single mother with regular access to their father.

    Everything else comes second. I don't think children need money to turn out well, but I think the kind of environment I want them to grow up in needs that... ie. no council housing, good school etc.
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    (Original post by falls_whisper)
    A loving, stable family. Number 1, pretty much. Failing that, a stable, self-sufficient single mother with regular access to their father.

    Everything else comes second. I don't think children need money to turn out well, but I think the kind of environment I want them to grow up in needs that... ie. no council housing, good school etc.
    Exactly the phrase i was going to type.
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    I want a better life for myself, and for that reason do not want children ever in my life.
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    Love, religion*, manners, respect, shelter/food/comfort(s)[?]
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    Not necessarily religion; i for one am far from religious in everyday life like but I hope they are at least theists.
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    I'll buy my children stuff like whatever clothes they want, but I won't spoil them. They'll have to save to buy other things. I wouldn't make them work or get a job though, that's harsh. Depends how much I was spending on myself, I wouldn't want to be spending loads on myself and none on them, that'd be pretty harsh as well (eg. buying yourself designer clothes but your children are only allowed Debenhams)

    Also a good private education (like I've had) would be essential, and a loving family of course.
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    stable, loving family, comfortable life in which nothing is scarce, however this will not stop me making them learn the value of money
    and good home and education and the ability to let them do as they wish with their lives (within boundaries), as long as they are happy, even if it means doing media studies at uni.....
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    (Original post by romeos*****)
    When people say that they want to provide better for their children, what exactly do you feel you've missed out on?

    I'm asking as this is one of the reasons people give for wanting to have a good career and make lots of money. Obviously ambition is a good thing but even if I did become well-off I wouldn't hand things to my children on a plate. I'd be more like Anita Roddick and expect my children to work hard themselves. (Not saying that all those whose parents do give them hand-outs don't work hard).

    I suppose I'm only asking this to people who have lived quite comfortably and not missed out on food or a place to live.
    Critical thinking lessons.
    Basic understanding of philosophical problems.
    Skim reading lessons.
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    (Original post by Malsy)
    Love, religion*, manners, respect, shelter/food/comfort(s)[?]
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    Not necessarily religion; i for one am far from religious in everyday life like but I hope they are at least theists.
    Are you mixing up religion with a form of 'spirituality'?
    Are you talking about warm fuzzy feelings?
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Are you mixing up religion with a form of 'spirituality'?
    Are you talking about warm fuzzy feelings?

    I'm talking about beliving in GOD, what's so hard to understand? Ideally I'd like it if they were the ''same'' religion as me, though, too. yes. tbh.
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    (Original post by Malsy)
    I'm talking about beliving in GOD, what's so hard to understand? Ideally I'd like it if they were the ''same'' religion as me, though, too. yes. tbh.
    I thought you were an atheist.
    Do you hope to bring your children up believe in in God, or just giving them your (and other peoples arguments of God) when they're say, 13 or so, and letting them decide?
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    I don't really feel i've missed out on anything, and when i have children i'm a firm believer that it's the things money can't buy that are most important. BUT if i'm able to, i would like them to have the option of a private education. I turned out alright from a normal comprehensive, but i do sometimes wonder if i'd have achieved more had i gone to a private school - or even the local grammar school which i decided against in my 11 year old wisdom. Still, i wouldn't change anything
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    Gosh, it's a pretty big question...I suppose I would want to give my kids a good start in life. Like a happy, caring family supporting them, a good rounded education, financial support etc. Ideally, I would want them to be able to leave home sensible, mature adults with a set of ideals and some sort of ultimate goal. I would want to provide them with anything that gets them to that point.

    Religion isn't so much of an issue...of course I would teach them my faith and culture so they know their heritage, but I wouldn't want them to commit themselves until they were old enough to make an informed decision.
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    I'd let them be independent. I'd support their decisions
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    Inbuilt respect and confidence.
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    I want my kids to be proud of their mum. :erm:
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    food, water, clothes and housing firstly lol.

    Then: love, security, stability, freedom, ambition, confidence, open-mindedness, financial help (to a point) and a nice house. I'd like them to see more of the world than i have too.

    I haven't not had some of these things myself, but they're still the things i'd like to provide.
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    Wisdom, more important than anything. I'd like them to develop critical thinking skills, and appreciate life, and I don't want them to love money as much as I do, and to understand that life is about experiences, not a big pay check.
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    Everything that I had/have, but with the addition of a better education. I really can't fault the way my parents dragged me up.
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    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    I want my kids to be proud of their mum. :erm:
    They will be dear.

    :hugs:
 
 
 
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