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    Why do so many universities continue to offer women's studies but no equivelant counterpart? I was just walking through the library last night when it struck me just how large the library section about women's rights, psychology, in sociology was. The equivelant books on masculine issues came to about a single shelf. Now I'm not saying there should be "men's studies" on offer purely to make things politically correct or anything.

    But I was wondering why exactly these degrees focus solely on a single gender. Why not have gender studies instead (a combination), afterall both genders have faced varying successes and oppression at varying times, and both have an equally rich history. It just seems odd to me, you wouldn't expect to see degrees solely on "men's health" or "women's psychology" etc.

    Of course I'm aware these degrees will offer some focus on masculine issues, but I suspect its not going to be in a wholly fair and balanced light.
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    Women's studies? :lolwut:

    What do they do on that course? Study tampons?
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    Unless you want to be part of a pressure group or activist, I don't see any clear reason for Women's Studies as a degree . Though I guess it could be considered a cross between History/Sociology?
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    (Original post by RJ555)
    Why do so many universities continue to offer women's studies but no equivelant counterpart? I was just walking through the library last night when it struck me just how large the library section about women's rights, psychology, in sociology was. The equivelant books on masculine issues came to about a single shelf. Now I'm not saying there should be "men's studies" on offer purely to make things politically correct or anything.

    But I was wondering why exactly these degrees focus solely on a single gender. Why not have gender studies instead (a combination), afterall both genders have faced varying successes and oppression at varying times, and both have an equally rich history. It just seems odd to me, you wouldn't expect to see degrees solely on "men's health" or "women's psychology" etc.

    Of course I'm aware these degrees will offer some focus on masculine issues, but I suspect its not going to be in a wholly fair and balanced light.
    When have men been oppressed below women? Genuine question.

    There are actually Gender Studies degrees, which study more on the interrelations between the genders, but I suppose Women's Studies is more of a narrow topic. I don't know why it bothers you? Unless it's for the political correctness reason, but you've already said it isn't.

    Also, what makes you think that masculine issues would not be presented in a fair or balanced light?
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    (Original post by RJ555)
    Why do so many universities continue to offer women's studies but no equivelant counterpart? I was just walking through the library last night when it struck me just how large the library section about women's rights, psychology, in sociology was. The equivelant books on masculine issues came to about a single shelf. Now I'm not saying there should be "men's studies" on offer purely to make things politically correct or anything.

    But I was wondering why exactly these degrees focus solely on a single gender. Why not have gender studies instead (a combination), afterall both genders have faced varying successes and oppression at varying times, and both have an equally rich history. It just seems odd to me, you wouldn't expect to see degrees solely on "men's health" or "women's psychology" etc.

    Of course I'm aware these degrees will offer some focus on masculine issues, but I suspect its not going to be in a wholly fair and balanced light.
    regarding the broad subject of your post, it's bad but things are improving. Last year a society was started for men. It wasn't allowed for years depsite there being a 'woman's society'

    (Original post by Jelkin)
    When have men been oppressed below women? Genuine question.
    Whilst I won't suggest they have been oppressed below womenk both sexes have faced oppression. Male oppression has made less progress than female opression in recent times; women were more oppressed to start with, so I'm not complaining.
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    WOmen Studies O.o

    Do they study Cleaning Cooking and doing what they are told. LOL


    This is what the course offers http://www.trentu.ca/womensstudies/course_2009ay.php
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    I would imagine the reason 'men's studies' isn't offered is that there is little demand for it and it would not be financially viable to run such a course
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    (Original post by Jelkin)
    When have men been oppressed below women? Genuine question.

    Also, what makes you think that masculine issues would not be presented in a fair or balanced light?
    Quite a few areas: Conscription (and other military issues), societal expectations/demands of role, Education (modern) legally, fatherhood, mens lives deemed less important (the old "women and children first" notion), lower seriousness taken of misandry/anti-male harrassment. To name but a few.

    The fact you even had to ask "when have men been oppressed", answers your second question. Mens issues are often deemed trivial or of lesser important to feminist issues (which I and the vast majority of the population are supportive of). This attitude is an issue in itself.
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    (Original post by RJ555)
    Quite a few areas: Conscription (and other military issues), societal expectations/demands of role, Education (modern) legally, fatherhood, mens lives deemed less important (the old "women and children first" notion), lower seriousness taken of misandry/anti-male harrassment. To name but a few.

    The fact you even had to ask "when have men been oppressed", answers your second question. Mens issues are often deemed trivial or of lesser important to feminist issues (which I and the vast majority of the population are supportive of). This attitude is an issue in itself.
    I think the main difference is, women never inflicted those things on men. Men inflicted it on themselves. Men were in power, not women, when the decisions to conscript men and bar women from professional roles took place.
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    (Original post by O-Ren)
    I think the main difference is, women never inflicted those things on men. Men inflicted it on themselves. Men were in power, not women, when the decisions to conscript men and bar women from professional roles took place.
    :yep:
    mens are the ones who state the standard for everyone else....
    who doesnt want women in the military? guess who?? :eek:
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    (Original post by RJ555)
    Why do so many universities continue to offer women's studies but no equivelant counterpart?
    err.....I think you'll find that the equivalent counterpart to womens studies would generally be any cultural/historical/sociological course in general...

    hence the point of womens studies...because generally masculine studies are the norm so to speak even if they aren't highlighted as such.

    It's the same argument I've had about "feminist theatre"

    Person: "well if there's feminist theatre why isn't there masculine theatre?"
    Me: "you know pretty much all theatre up until about 1980?"
    Person: "yes"
    Me:........duh.
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    (Original post by O-Ren)
    I would imagine the reason 'men's studies' isn't offered is that there is little demand for it and it would not be financially viable to run such a course
    tbh im not sure why there would be any demand for either. Or atleast i cant think of logical reason to study either just seems like a waste of 3 years of your life.
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    (Original post by O-Ren)
    I think the main difference is, women never inflicted those things on men. Men inflicted it on themselves. Men were in power, not women, when the decisions to conscript men and bar women from professional roles took place.
    True, and thats a good point. But women have played there role alongside those few men who make these negative and harmful decisions. For instance, there was a large amount of pressure from female pressure groups etc forcing men to go to war/in production of propaganda etc. Both genders are responsible.

    And now, theres also women who block movements for things like raising the debate of male health/funding etc. So men have caused the problems historically, but now, both women and men prevent the problems from being solved.
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    (Original post by renlok)
    tbh im not sure why there would be any demand for either. Or atleast i cant think of logical reason to study either just seems like a waste of 3 years of your life.
    No, it's certainly not a degree course I'd be interested in either. But I guess someone who's interested in sociology might want to specifically deal with the issues affecting one gender or race or class or age group. I know that as well as Women's Studies there are Child Studies, African-American studies, Jewish studies. I imagine them heading towards journalism, politics and activism.
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    (Original post by RJ555)
    True, and thats a good point. But women have played there role alongside those few men who make these negative and harmful decisions. For instance, there was a large amount of pressure from female pressure groups etc forcing men to go to war/in production of propaganda etc. Both genders are responsible.

    And now, theres also women who block movements for things like raising the debate of male health/funding etc. So men have caused the problems historically, but now, both women and men prevent the problems from being solved.
    I would say that sexism is more widespread amongst men than women, but yes you make a really good point. True equality will never be reached while there remains such a man vs woman attitude. For every negative belief about one gender there must be a subsequent belief about the other: for example, saying women should stay at home and raise children because that is their 'role' is what has led to men having less rights than women over their children. We need to work together if either gender is to be free to behave how they want to. It's what the likes of Harriet Harman can't understand.
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    (Original post by O-Ren)
    I think the main difference is, women never inflicted those things on men. Men inflicted it on themselves. Men were in power, not women, when the decisions to conscript men and bar women from professional roles took place.
    its a different generation, you were not one of those women who was the victim but the issues affecting men exist now

    and

    stop living in the past
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    I have a book on women's studies and a fair proportion of it is about men and masculinities. In most unis the 'women's studies' has been changed to 'gender studies' so perhaps they're old books.

    I think the main reason why there is specific women's studies books is because other areas of sociology/psychology are written about men, even though it doesn't make it explicit. It's the same with ethnic minority groups/working-class people.
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    (Original post by DOA)
    its a different generation, you were not one of those women who was the victim but the issues affecting men exist now

    and

    stop living in the past
    Erm, the reason I'm talking about the past is because we're discussing 'Women's Studies'/hypothetical 'Men's Studies' degrees. I would assume degrees of that nature deal largely with the past. Present too of course, but mainly past.

    And I never denied there were issues affecting men.

    Edit: if you see my above post it sums up my feelings on the matter of sexism in the present
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    (Original post by RJ555)
    Why do so many universities continue to offer women's studies but no equivelant counterpart? I was just walking through the library last night when it struck me just how large the library section about women's rights, psychology, in sociology was. The equivelant books on masculine issues came to about a single shelf. Now I'm not saying there should be "men's studies" on offer purely to make things politically correct or anything.

    But I was wondering why exactly these degrees focus solely on a single gender. Why not have gender studies instead (a combination), afterall both genders have faced varying successes and oppression at varying times, and both have an equally rich history. It just seems odd to me, you wouldn't expect to see degrees solely on "men's health" or "women's psychology" etc.

    Of course I'm aware these degrees will offer some focus on masculine issues, but I suspect its not going to be in a wholly fair and balanced light.
    Until relatively recently, almost all literature was written by men. "Men's Studies" is not necessary given the sheer bias academia has towards male-centric views. Given the dominance of men throughout history (inside and outside of academia), a few shelves of books written about women isn't exactly a prejudicial act.
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    (Original post by The Boosh)
    Until relatively recently, almost all literature was written by men. "Men's Studies" is not necessary given the sheer bias academia has towards male-centric views. Given the dominance of men throughout history (inside and outside of academia), a few shelves of books written about women isn't exactly a prejudicial act.
    :ditto: this given it's what I study

    Tbh OP, what you'll find that bar the few shelves on women's studies and feminism, the rest of the library's resources would effectively come under men's studies, given like Boosh has said, the dominance of men in academia and the general world.

    And it's only now, thanks to the work written by feminists in the 70s that books focussing on masculinity as a theory are appearing (Connell would be one to read ) and the two are becoming more and more merged by the younger generation of academics who are prepared to actually stand up and say that 'gender equals both sexes'. So many people use 'gender' to talk about women which isn't right but alas I've spent 4 years reading about this stuff and feminists can be quite narrow minded.

    Oh and there are hundreds of texts titled 'masculinity in x' - the medical treatment after the First World War would be a massive example.
 
 
 
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