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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Well, sexual relationships are usually based upon mutual physical attraction at some level. It is very unlikely that the women will often be attracted to their clients; in some cases they may even be positively repelled. Is it wrong, therefore, that they sell themselves in such a way? Indeed, one could argue that money makes the bargain a more equal one, but, still, one cannot deny that the woman will often be performing acts with people that she'd prefer not to. Of course, it would be unfortunate if such clients never got any sexual attention -- but we do live in a very unfortunate world.
    I'd rather not sell any sort of service for money, does that make working in general wrong?

    Your posts are usually very well thought out and intelligent, whats happened?
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    Define 'disabled'.
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    (Original post by D R E A M Z)
    I'd rather not sell any sort of service for money, does that make working in general wrong?

    Your posts are usually very well thought out and intelligent, whats happened?
    Well, I sense that this may branch out into a discussion of economics/politics, so, if you don't mind, can we keep that for another thread? There is most definitely a level of expolitation in the world of work though, even if not in all particular jobs. However, one might argue that such exploitation is necessary.

    Of course, "exploitation" is also an inherently subjective judgement, so one could make a different judgement based on one's patterns of thinking. On a less subjective level, though, it could be said that work may produce great amount of unhappiness (defined by biological effects). The most obvious example perhaps being the East Asian workhouses factories that produce much of our consumer goods/clothing.

    Again, that is not necessarily an argument against work, merely a descriptive statement about it. Just as one could argue that, despite all the negative points, "sex work" is unavoidable.
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    (Original post by Profesh)
    Define 'disabled'.
    It has a common definition in general parlance that I suspect you are aware of; would you like to challenge that definition?
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    :O willies



    But what an odd idea.

    if you are blind, you don't know if you are being followed by a cop
    disabled people make 10% of our population of which, say 5% need a sex worker

    it just gets odder.
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    Hmmm I have mixed views on sex workers or anyone in general not just sex workers since attraction often is just often and hugely a form of ego. Hence I could go out and not pull at all, by a mix of my looks or attitude, then go out looking the same with a different attitude and pull far more women but then wouldnt pull some of the ones that I could before, or say lose weight and get a different group of girls attracted to me.

    Attraction is done by a kind of social acceptance thing, or a form of repition and about how your ego is flattered as I said above.

    I say all this because I often get turned down because I am overweight, or because I look older than I am and I have slept with some girls before who have liked be because say they like guys who have glasses and dont spent too much effort on their looks, or a guy with broad shoulders.

    I think shows like what Gok Wan does shows how people often dont make the effort they did before and suddenly become far more attractive.
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    I feel profoundly revolted.
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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    I feel profoundly revolted.
    Why? Care to elaborate?
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    A quote from the website: "Sex workers help disabled people live out the fantasy of being beautiful and sexy and desirable, momentarily escaping the social stigma of their disability."
    Isn't that what World of Warcraft is for? :mmm:
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Well, I sense that this may branch out into a discussion of economics/politics, so, if you don't mind, can we keep that for another thread? There is most definitely a level of expolitation in the world of work though, even if not in all particular jobs. However, one might argue that such exploitation is necessary.

    Of course, "exploitation" is also an inherently subjective judgement, so one could make a different judgement based on one's patterns of thinking. On a less subjective level, though, it could be said that work may produce great amount of unhappiness (defined by biological effects).

    Again, that is not necessarily an argument against work, merely a descriptive statement about it.
    Yeah sure, I wouldn't want to derail the thread. I'll quickly add though, that it is more a case of nature exploiting people rather than work.
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    They have the choice. Unlike in the illegal sex market, it will be closly inspected if legal, therefore preventing human trafiking. It actuly will prevent women from being forced into prostitution.
    So long as poverty exists and men are willing to pay for sex, women will be exploited and forced into the illegal and legal sex industry. I despise any notion of paying for sex because it only fuels the industry. Personally, I feel the same way about men who pay for sex as I do about rapists- I hate them.
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    (Original post by D R E A M Z)
    Yeah sure, I wouldn't want to derail the thread. I'll quickly add though, that it is more a case of nature exploiting people rather than work.
    I may as well ask: why nature? You mean that the status quo is natural and unavoidable?
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    It has a common definition in general parlance that I suspect you are aware of; would you like to challenge that definition?
    I'm wondering whether thirty years of enforced celibacy would qualify someone as sufficiently 'disabled' to benefit from this scheme, given that its stated aim is to alleviate long-term sexual frustration (which, remarkably enough, is not the sole preserve of Stephen Hawking).
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Why? Care to elaborate?
    The idea works on the assumption that it is perfectly reasonable to treat womens' bodies as commodities, to be bought and sold. I find it deeply distasteful and misogynistic.
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    I've now got this lovely mental image of a bunch of pensioners all sat around sipping tea, munching on biscuits and knitting whilst watching dirty Lucinda go at it on a pole.
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    (Original post by Earthly)
    So long as poverty exists and men are willing to pay for sex, women will be exploited and forced into the illegal and legal sex industry. I despise any notion of paying for sex because it only fuels the industry. Personally, I feel the same way about men who pay for sex as I do about rapists- I hate them.
    Its just a difference of opinion but it brings up the idea of what is exploitation, if the women want to work in it how is it exploiting them, if they get paid well and want to do it then so what.

    However to compare someone who pays for sex to a rapist is quite stupid to be honest, I have a friend who worked in Amsterdam for 2 years, he paid for sex sometimes but he said it was because it worked out cheaper than a date and because it is big industry across there the workers get regular drug and std checks so its actually safer than meeting a random girl in a bar.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    I may as well ask: why nature? You mean that the status quo is natural and unavoidable?
    No, that the nature of nature itself forces us to work, i.e. how we have finite resources that we are reliant upon to survive.
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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    The idea works on the assumption that it is perfectly reasonable to treat womens' bodies as commodities, to be bought and sold. I find it deeply distasteful and misogynistic.
    Don't many/most relationships work on the assumption that others' bodies are commodities also though? :hubba: Would you go out with someone whom you found profoundly unattractive? If not, surely you are commodifing his body (and seeing it of such little value as not to be worth buying into long-term).
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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    The idea works on the assumption that it is perfectly reasonable to treat womens' bodies as commodities, to be bought and sold. I find it deeply distasteful and misogynistic.
    Agreed. It also works on the assumption that men have a right to sex, and to women's bodies. It's offensive towards the men, assuming that they're incapable of having a relationship with women because they're disabled. It also implies the sex drive of men is more important than the wellbeing of women in the prostitution industry.
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    (Original post by D R E A M Z)
    No, that the nature of nature itself forces us to work, i.e. how we have finite resources that we are reliant upon to survive.
    Most probably (assuming that we don't have a sudden population cull!). That's not to say that it forces us to work as we do currently though.
 
 
 
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