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    I have one offer for a global markets operations role with a bank that won't have some of the 'issues' you usually get between front office and mo/bo, with a chance to do things like risk management, audit, and post trae stuff etc

    or a non-graduate scheme ACCA trainee position with one of the big four in audit.

    which is likely to offer the best career prospects in terms of both skills, rewards and chances to advance?

    thanks in advance.
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    (Original post by circling the drain)
    I have one offer for a global markets operations role with a bank that won't have some of the 'issues' you usually get between front office and mo/bo, with a chance to do things like risk management, audit, and post trae stuff etc

    or a non-graduate scheme ACCA trainee position with one of the big four in audit.

    which is likely to offer the best career prospects in terms of both skills, rewards and chances to advance?

    thanks in advance.
    That one. Accountancy with which company?
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    (Original post by Maturity)
    That one. Accountancy with which company?

    Ernst & Young. It pays 13k less to start with, but i realise that would change once qualified. What's your reasoning?
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    My dad used to work at Ernst and Young! But that was like 15+ years ago

    What bank is it?
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    HSBC (i.e pretty conservative)
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    what degree did you do?
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    I've got a first in history and politics and a masters in IR, top-ten uni. I've worked in financial services for about a year and a half in a non-grad role.
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    My boyfriend works at Ernst and Young. He used to work at Accenture (another one of those-type companies)! He really likes it. He does business consultant stuff though. They have fast-track schemes and you work your way up pretty quick. He's only been working for 5 years (6 with a year of travelling) as he started uni late and he's already a manager. I don't know how far this applies to you, but it's a good company, good people, he enjoys it and he's not the business-man type at all! Very laid back. That said, you should go for the job which you have the best feeling about and which you'll do the stuff you most enjoy in. EY will look great on your cv if you choose to change jobs
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    (Original post by circling the drain)
    Ernst & Young. It pays 13k less to start with, but i realise that would change once qualified. What's your reasoning?
    Better career prospects.
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    (Original post by circling the drain)
    I've got a first in history and politics and a masters in IR, top-ten uni. I've worked in financial services for about a year and a half in a non-grad role.
    Did you want to end up in Front Office? You seem like a pretty strong candidate..
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    (Original post by loggins)
    Did you want to end up in Front Office? You seem like a pretty strong candidate..
    Not massively to be honest - I'm much more into risk management etc

    I realise at Ernst & Young that if you work hard and get your ACCA with a good score you can progress quite far...but I'm not that into audit so if I wanted to progress I would probably look for something elsewhere once I had gained the qualification. I'm also worried about the fact that it isn't a grad programme.

    But with MO/BO jobs, I realise they can be looked down upon, and I can't really see a career progression other than management.
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    (Original post by circling the drain)
    Not massively to be honest - I'm much more into risk management etc

    I realise at Ernst & Young that if you work hard and get your ACCA with a good score you can progress quite far...but I'm not that into audit so if I wanted to progress I would probably look for something elsewhere once I had gained the qualification. I'm also worried about the fact that it isn't a grad programme.

    But with MO/BO jobs, I realise they can be looked down upon, and I can't really see a career progression other than management.
    Personally I wouldn't recommend the ACA or ACCA if you're not 'into audit', lol, it's going to be tough pushing yourself in those exams if you're not interested in them. I know so many people who've started schemes at the big4 who just hate their lives now, lol. Also, have you found out what the differences are in training etc if you're not on a grad scheme?
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    (Original post by loggins)
    Personally I wouldn't recommend the ACA or ACCA if you're not 'into audit', lol, it's going to be tough pushing yourself in those exams if you're not interested in them. I know so many people who've started schemes at the big4 who just hate their lives now, lol. Also, have you found out what the differences are in training etc if you're not on a grad scheme?
    Well I would just be using the job to get the ACCA and then transferring because I don't really want to do audit for the rest of my life...As far as I know I do on the job training as normal and then get some study time before jobs. Common sense would indicate that they don't put as much effort into me as someone on a grad scheme

    If I wanted to be a sketchy git I could start the e & y role, as it starts 4 months before the other, and leave if I didn't like it. However, I'm not sure I'm confortable with that.
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    (Original post by circling the drain)
    Well I would just be using the job to get the ACCA and then transferring because I don't really want to do audit for the rest of my life...As far as I know I do on the job training as normal and then get some study time before jobs. Common sense would indicate that they don't put as much effort into me as someone on a grad scheme

    If I wanted to be a sketchy git I could start the e & y role, as it starts 4 months before the other, and leave if I didn't like it. However, I'm not sure I'm confortable with that.
    Why not? You probably only need to give them a month's notice at most, maybe even a week.
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    (Original post by loggins)
    Why not? You probably only need to give them a month's notice at most, maybe even a week.

    yeah i know but morally it isnt great and it probably isnt fun explaining why you only did a job for four months...
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    (Original post by circling the drain)
    yeah i know but morally it isnt great and it probably isnt fun explaining why you only did a job for four months...
    kill emotions (serious advice). its not about morals, as long as you follow the proper procedure (notice etc), no one cares. As for not burnoing bridges, you'll probably only interact with people from your dept (not being on a grad role), who will in most probability be sticking to audit for the rest of their lives, so no worries there. my friends at big4 are interviewing alongside their current jobs at better places.

    You have an amazing option, don't lose it.

    Further advice about Audit vs staying in house, i would recommend the former (perhaps biased, as I am doing the same but I have friends who are in finance schemes of banks, so could provide a realistic picture);

    Audit:
    1. Direct interaction with clients (you are the front office of E&Y)
    2. Not a desk job, travelling all the time
    3. Exposure of number of different companies, so you'll understand how big (and small) companies work, what is their structure like etc
    4. If you are proactive, you can keep asking them questions about non-accounting issues as well, so you will be able to gain an idea of a number of different businesses as well. Thus, financial consulting remains an open option
    5. Having said all this, after a year it's a ****ing boring job though. The learning curve in first 6/7 months is very very steep but after that you are applying the same process everywhere
    6. Nice exit opportunities: Even if you absolutely hate it, at the end of 3 years, you will be quite a wanted commodity. If not investment banking, you can start high up in the finance function (including risk management) of any organisation (London pay £60K+£10/15 bonus, standard 9 to 5 job, maybe longer around the time that the company reports its results)

    Ops with HSBC:
    1. Number 1 to 4 above dont apply. My friend is doing ops at Goldman (just because its Goldman) and he is bored out of his mind. Essentially, all he does everyday is make reconciliations which is checking that the trade that a trader has made has been properly recorded in the company's system
    2. Audit is very boring but atleast you have variety of clients / travelling etc. COming to the same office everyday, sitting with the same people everyday and doing marginally different tasks evertday will never give you as much exposure
    3. Exit opps are not that great. You only know about 1 organisation at the end of it.

    My 2 cents. Good luck choosing...
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    all valid points, although I'm not sure where you've got the info on 60k for an acca qualified accountant, everywhere else has put it significantly lower.

    The main pros of the other jobs are that it is

    -very well paid.
    -i should be able to fast track into management as a) im on the grad scheme, and b) a lot of the other career-focused people will be aiming at front office roles, thus eliminating a lot of the competition.
    - i'm actually quite interested in the work.
    - the kudos of getting on a grad scheme probably looks good on the c.v
    - i can leave the role iof i dont like it and go into accountancy fairly easily. it's a lot harder to do it the other way around.

    cheers for the advice guys.

    the ideal situation would be doing 6 months accountancy now and seeing whether i liked it, if not i've got another role lined up. like i said not sure that it is a great way to go about things
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    all valid points, although I'm not sure where you've got the info on 60k for an acca qualified accountant, everywhere else has put it significantly lower.

    The main pros of the other jobs are that it is

    -very well paid.
    -i should be able to fast track into management as a) im on the grad scheme, and b) a lot of the other career-focused people will be aiming at front office roles, thus eliminating a lot of the competition.
    - i'm actually quite interested in the work.
    - the kudos of getting on a grad scheme probably looks good on the c.v
    - i can leave the role iof i dont like it and go into accountancy fairly easily. it's a lot harder to do it the other way around.

    cheers for the advice guys.

    the ideal situation would be doing 6 months accountancy now and seeing whether i liked it, if not i've got another role lined up. like i said not sure that it is a great way to go about things
 
 
 
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